The real Ruby vs. Python.

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Abe Vionas_MailingList, Oct 27, 2004.

  1. What it comes down to is what it's coming down to for
    me... platform maturity.

    Python on windows has a broad range of libraries
    available for anything you could ever dream of:
    Apache, Java, Email, Protocols, GTK, Qt, Tk, OpenGL,
    PostgreSQL, MySQL, etc etc etc. As far as Python
    library availability for Linux, I really don't know,
    as I was only looking for windows stuff last night. My
    feeling is that while not being quite as comprehensive
    as it's windows offerings it still offers a good
    depth.

    Ruby, on the other hand, while it has a comprehensive
    offering on the Linux platform, is hamstrung on
    windows by it's lack in important areas. If libraries
    exist, they more often then not are NOT being actively
    maintained (my research last night indicated that by
    and large more Python libraries are continually
    actively maintained). This last point is important
    because at one time or another Ruby has HAD libraries
    to cover any need, but without active maintenance they
    are nearly worthless. I for one will not even look at
    a library that hasn't had a release in 2004.

    So, this is what it comes down to for me... Which
    language offers what I need in terms of libraries? I
    decided to go looking after having an excrutiating
    time finding just Ruby FastCGI, mod_ruby, and
    PostgreSQL libraries which would actually work on
    Windows - forget being maintained at all. No luck
    though. Even a post to the Ruby-Talk list asking for
    help with an attempt to install FastCGI for Ruby
    yielded only one reply.

    Finally, while the Ruby Gem system is exceptionally
    easy to work with and a real boon to Ruby, it doesn't
    quite match the ease of installing ANY given Python
    library. Every Python windows library for the most
    part comes with a windows installer (exe or msi).

    Keep in mind that it may be more doable to run Ruby on
    windows given substantial C programming/compiling
    experience, I don't know. Obviously, if I had the
    experience to satisfy that statement I would be able
    to answer my own question. : -)

    So, for those of us who aren't C gurus and don't run
    Linux, Python seems to win out when compared to Ruby.
    Which is unfortunate because I really love Ruby, and
    don't like a number of Python elements. However,
    having the capabilities I need is much more important
    than syntax preferences at the moment.

    Sadly, in order for Ruby to really take over the world
    it will require a more substantial focus on providing
    windows compatible libraries and maintaining those
    libraries. If Ruby continues to be a Linux-centric
    language... I don't know. It just seems to me fairly
    obvious that in order to have true dominance you have
    to meet the needs of the major platforms. Python does
    this moreso then Ruby. And believe me, I wish it were
    the other way around.

    I'll keep my eye on Ruby, and return when it offers
    the essentials I require. But until then I'll be
    laboring under a hot Python sun.

    Regards, Abe Vionas




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    Abe Vionas_MailingList, Oct 27, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On Oct 27, 2004, at 9:11 AM, Abe Vionas_MailingList wrote:

    > I for one will not even look at
    > a library that hasn't had a release in 2004.


    This is a very strange comment, in my opinion. A library may simply
    function as intended and thus, not need an update.

    > So, this is what it comes down to for me... Which
    > language offers what I need in terms of libraries?


    If you're chief interest is an impressive store of modules, I seriously
    doubt anything tops the CPAN.

    James Edward Gray II
     
    James Edward Gray II, Oct 27, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    David Ross Guest

    Abe Vionas_MailingList wrote:

    >What it comes down to is what it's coming down to for
    >me... platform maturity.
    >
    >Python on windows has a broad range of libraries
    >available for anything you could ever dream of:
    >Apache, Java, Email, Protocols, GTK, Qt, Tk, OpenGL,
    >PostgreSQL, MySQL, etc etc etc. As far as Python
    >library availability for Linux, I really don't know,
    >as I was only looking for windows stuff last night. My
    >feeling is that while not being quite as comprehensive
    >as it's windows offerings it still offers a good
    >depth.
    >
    >Ruby, on the other hand, while it has a comprehensive
    >offering on the Linux platform, is hamstrung on
    >windows by it's lack in important areas. If libraries
    >exist, they more often then not are NOT being actively
    >maintained (my research last night indicated that by
    >and large more Python libraries are continually
    >actively maintained). This last point is important
    >because at one time or another Ruby has HAD libraries
    >to cover any need, but without active maintenance they
    >are nearly worthless. I for one will not even look at
    >a library that hasn't had a release in 2004.
    >
    >
    >

    Binary releases are sometimes a problem, most of us are unix users,
    there are some windows users. I think a few need to get together and
    compile windows binaries. Hopefully, I will be able to continue to have
    access to a win2k machine and compile much for the RPA ruby packaging
    system. Sorry it didnt work out for you. I will be having a GUI for RPA
    soon. I'm the type of person who does think about Windows users and GUIs
    for the people who might not know typical compiling routines. Some
    linuxes just have a packaging system for them to do it for them, I have
    BSD. I know its not easy on windows, I will get some effort into helping
    RPA witht he GUI and compiling windows binaries.

    What exactly are you needing? What type of developer are you? and What
    are the type of modules do you regularly use on Windows?

    I'm not a frequent windows developer, but I do know a great deal about
    Windows programming. Effort to solve the Windows area is underway.



    >So, this is what it comes down to for me... Which
    >language offers what I need in terms of libraries? I
    >decided to go looking after having an excrutiating
    >time finding just Ruby FastCGI, mod_ruby, and
    >PostgreSQL libraries which would actually work on
    >Windows - forget being maintained at all. No luck
    >though. Even a post to the Ruby-Talk list asking for
    >help with an attempt to install FastCGI for Ruby
    >yielded only one reply.
    >
    >
    >

    I seen your question, I didn't know the answer though. Did you try the
    maintainer?

    >Finally, while the Ruby Gem system is exceptionally
    >easy to work with and a real boon to Ruby, it doesn't
    >quite match the ease of installing ANY given Python
    >library. Every Python windows library for the most
    >part comes with a windows installer (exe or msi).
    >
    >

    Would you rather have a GUI, and/or executables which can be installed?
    hmm thoughts for RPA

    >Keep in mind that it may be more doable to run Ruby on
    >windows given substantial C programming/compiling
    >experience, I don't know. Obviously, if I had the
    >experience to satisfy that statement I would be able
    >to answer my own question. : -)
    >
    >

    No problem. What problems were you having, besides fastcgi, and I can
    look in to it on my spare time.

    >So, for those of us who aren't C gurus and don't run
    >Linux, Python seems to win out when compared to Ruby.
    >Which is unfortunate because I really love Ruby, and
    >don't like a number of Python elements. However,
    >having the capabilities I need is much more important
    >than syntax preferences at the moment.
    >
    >Sadly, in order for Ruby to really take over the world
    >it will require a more substantial focus on providing
    >windows compatible libraries and maintaining those
    >libraries. If Ruby continues to be a Linux-centric
    >language... I don't know. It just seems to me fairly
    >obvious that in order to have true dominance you have
    >to meet the needs of the major platforms. Python does
    >this moreso then Ruby. And believe me, I wish it were
    >the other way around.
    >
    >


    please use the term, unix-centric. I'm a BSDuser :) Thanks.

    Also, I agree, Ruby is more towards unix, some of the developers dislike
    programming on windows, not mentioning any names but he knows who he is
    :). Its not so much that libraries are unix-centric, but someone needs
    to compile the libraries on Windows. Most libraries already work well
    with windows, but its a compiling issue.

    >I'll keep my eye on Ruby, and return when it offers
    >the essentials I require. But until then I'll be
    >laboring under a hot Python sun.
    >
    >Regards, Abe Vionas
    >
    >
    >

    Maybe sometime in the future it will get better for Windows users, we
    can only hope.
    If you have any questions, drop me an email.

    David Ross
    --
    Hazzle free packages for Ruby?
    RPA is available from http://www.rubyarchive.org/
     
    David Ross, Oct 27, 2004
    #3
  4. On Wed, Oct 27, 2004 at 11:11:19PM +0900, Abe Vionas_MailingList wrote:
    > I'll keep my eye on Ruby, and return when it offers
    > the essentials I require. But until then I'll be
    > laboring under a hot Python sun.


    you make the point excellently.
    noone takes on the job, and therefore..
    yeah. noone takes on the job.

    :(

    Alex
     
    Alexander Kellett, Oct 27, 2004
    #4
  5. I tried using the basic Ruby for windows package and got a few
    mysterious errors ("readline.dll not found" when running irb).

    I backed that out and used Cygwin to install ruby. Now it runs perfectly.

    I was able to install RubyGems and start exploring that as well. It
    didn't work with the "native" Ruby, but is completely seamless (to my
    cursory examination) when using Ruby under Cygwin.

    Cygwin, by explantion, is a POSIX layer on top of Windows. It adds
    aptget/rpm type functionality ... you download a small installer and
    it downloads package descriptions for all the (Li|U)nixy stuff. It
    handles downloading, installing, versioning, dependencies.

    http://www.cygwin.com/


    On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 23:11:19 +0900, Abe Vionas_MailingList
    <> wrote:
    > What it comes down to is what it's coming down to for
    > me... platform maturity.
    >
    > Python on windows has a broad range of libraries
    > available for anything you could ever dream of:
    > Apache, Java, Email, Protocols, GTK, Qt, Tk, OpenGL,
    > PostgreSQL, MySQL, etc etc etc. As far as Python
    > library availability for Linux, I really don't know,
    > as I was only looking for windows stuff last night. My
    > feeling is that while not being quite as comprehensive
    > as it's windows offerings it still offers a good
    > depth.
    >

    --
    Howard M. Lewis Ship
    Independent J2EE / Open-Source Java Consultant
    Creator, Jakarta Tapestry
    Creator, Jakarta HiveMind
    http://howardlewisship.com
     
    Howard Lewis Ship, Oct 27, 2004
    #5
  6. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    Matt Mower Guest

    On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 23:39:48 +0900, Alexander Kellett
    <> wrote:
    > you make the point excellently.
    > noone takes on the job, and therefore..
    > yeah. noone takes on the job.
    >


    As a windows user I feel I should chip in here. I don't think I'm
    feeling as unloved as the OP and I can live with a little unix
    centricity but I wouldn't argue with Ruby becoming more Win-friendly.
    I think the one-click installer is a great step in that direction but
    I guess there are others.

    I have windows programming experience but it's mostly either very old,
    rusty, and not terribly relevant (e.g. C/C++ on Windows 3.0) or new
    and shallow (VS.NET & C#). Most of my recent programming career has
    been Java.

    I'd like to help though and, if there is a Ruby on Windows community,
    I would get involved.

    Regards,

    Matt
     
    Matt Mower, Oct 27, 2004
    #6
  7. On Wednesday 27 October 2004 10:11 am, Abe Vionas_MailingList wrote:
    | Ruby, on the other hand, while it has a comprehensive
    | offering on the Linux platform, is hamstrung on
    | windows by it's lack in important areas. If libraries
    | exist, they more often then not are NOT being actively
    | maintained (my research last night indicated that by
    | and large more Python libraries are continually
    | actively maintained). This last point is important
    | because at one time or another Ruby has HAD libraries
    | to cover any need, but without active maintenance they
    | are nearly worthless. I for one will not even look at
    | a library that hasn't had a release in 2004.

    Ironically that should be a good thing!

    It's a poor indicator. A lib may be "relatively perfected" and need not be
    changed ever again. People are too caught up on changing things. Get
    something to work well, then start a new project.

    But I do hear you --since the above is rarely ever done.

    2 cents,
    T.
     
    trans. (T. Onoma), Oct 27, 2004
    #7
  8. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    David Ross Guest

    Matt Mower wrote:

    >On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 23:39:48 +0900, Alexander Kellett
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>you make the point excellently.
    >>noone takes on the job, and therefore..
    >>yeah. noone takes on the job.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >As a windows user I feel I should chip in here. I don't think I'm
    >feeling as unloved as the OP and I can live with a little unix
    >centricity but I wouldn't argue with Ruby becoming more Win-friendly.
    >I think the one-click installer is a great step in that direction but
    >I guess there are others.
    >
    >I have windows programming experience but it's mostly either very old,
    >rusty, and not terribly relevant (e.g. C/C++ on Windows 3.0) or new
    >and shallow (VS.NET & C#). Most of my recent programming career has
    >been Java.
    >
    >I'd like to help though and, if there is a Ruby on Windows community,
    >I would get involved.
    >
    >Regards,
    >
    >Matt
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Would you be willing to help me package binaries for RPA? :) I can help
    you re-learn if needed.

    David Ross
    --
    Hazzle free packages for Ruby?
    RPA is available from http://www.rubyarchive.org/
     
    David Ross, Oct 27, 2004
    #8
  9. On Wednesday 27 October 2004 10:48 am, Howard Lewis Ship wrote:
    | I tried using the basic Ruby for windows package and got a few
    | mysterious errors ("readline.dll not found" when running irb).
    |
    | I backed that out and used Cygwin to install ruby. Now it runs perfectly.
    |
    | I was able to install RubyGems and start exploring that as well. It
    | didn't work with the "native" Ruby, but is completely seamless (to my
    | cursory examination) when using Ruby under Cygwin.
    |
    | Cygwin, by explantion, is a POSIX layer on top of Windows. It adds
    | aptget/rpm type functionality ... you download a small installer and
    | it downloads package descriptions for all the (Li|U)nixy stuff. It
    | handles downloading, installing, versioning, dependencies.
    |
    | http://www.cygwin.com/


    Are there downsides to this approach for Windows users?

    T.
     
    trans. (T. Onoma), Oct 27, 2004
    #9
  10. On Wed, Oct 27, 2004 at 11:51:33PM +0900, Matt Mower wrote:
    > As a windows user I feel I should chip in here. I don't think I'm
    > feeling as unloved as the OP and I can live with a little unix
    > centricity but I wouldn't argue with Ruby becoming more Win-friendly.
    > I think the one-click installer is a great step in that direction but
    > I guess there are others.


    the main problem is that even while i was on
    windows i still had no clue how to help out,
    build packages etc. i certainly don't have a
    spare copy of vs.net or anything lying around
    here so i'd be able to do, well, exactly nothing.

    Alex
     
    Alexander Kellett, Oct 27, 2004
    #10
  11. On Thu, Oct 28, 2004 at 12:07:10AM +0900, trans. (T. Onoma) wrote:
    > Are there downsides to this approach for Windows users?


    cygwin is huge has an awful interface and
    has severe problems with having multiple
    cygwin1.dll's on the same system.

    native compiles are by far my preference.
    windows far from a single platform is *FAR*
    more fragmented that linux will ever be.

    how many ruby windows sub-platforms exist
    now in total? four or is it five now? how
    can anyone be expected to help when all of
    them suck in there own little way? (e.g,
    1-click doesn't have a standard package
    thats in base ruby - curses)

    Alex (who can't wait any longer to get his ibook and
    remove both windows *and* linux at long last)
     
    Alexander Kellett, Oct 27, 2004
    #11
  12. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    Justin Rudd Guest

    > you make the point excellently.
    > noone takes on the job, and therefore..
    > yeah. noone takes on the job.


    I've tried a bit. I've got MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQLite/Ruby
    compiled for Windows. The PostgreSQL I haven't released because I
    haven't tested it thoroughly. Although I'll probably release the
    PostgreSQL one and let the community test it for me :)

    My next project is OpenSSL so that I can use the Ruby SSH project.
    But that is going to be awhile (I'm in the middle of moving from
    Arizona to Washington).

    The thing I've noticed is that the extension library code (the C code)
    usually has dependencies on things that are not defined in Windows.
    That is what takes the most time to get around. But the good news is
    that it is a small minority of projects that have this problem.

    --
    Justin Rudd
    http://seagecko.org/thoughts/
     
    Justin Rudd, Oct 27, 2004
    #12
  13. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    Justin Rudd Guest

    > Are there downsides to this approach for Windows users?

    Licensing? If you are interested in just writing programs to use
    internally or for personal use, probably no problems. But if you want
    to resell your app, I'm not sure how the Cygwin license applies to
    your code. Maybe it doesn't affect your code, but the ruby
    interpreter that you would have to ship depends on the Cygwin DLL.
    And to redistribute that, you have to make your source code available
    (the way I read the license). Now is that the source code of the
    interpreter or your programs running in the interpreter? It was gray
    enough to make me steer clear of it.

    --
    Justin Rudd
    http://seagecko.org/thoughts/
     
    Justin Rudd, Oct 27, 2004
    #13
  14. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    David Ross Guest

    Alexander Kellett wrote:

    >On Wed, Oct 27, 2004 at 11:51:33PM +0900, Matt Mower wrote:
    >
    >
    >>As a windows user I feel I should chip in here. I don't think I'm
    >>feeling as unloved as the OP and I can live with a little unix
    >>centricity but I wouldn't argue with Ruby becoming more Win-friendly.
    >>I think the one-click installer is a great step in that direction but
    >>I guess there are others.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >the main problem is that even while i was on
    >windows i still had no clue how to help out,
    >build packages etc. i certainly don't have a
    >spare copy of vs.net or anything lying around
    >here so i'd be able to do, well, exactly nothing.
    >
    >Alex
    >
    >
    >
    >

    You can use mingw32. Help out you blasted lypanov. :p I told earlier you
    its up to us, not end users.

    David Ross
    --
    Hazzle free packages for Ruby?
    RPA is available from http://www.rubyarchive.org/
     
    David Ross, Oct 27, 2004
    #14
  15. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    Curt Hibbs Guest

    Unix vs Windows [was: The real Ruby vs. Python.]

    David Ross wrote:
    > Binary releases are sometimes a problem, most of us are unix users,
    > there are some windows users.


    I am a big proponent of being cross-platform *and* making things as easy as
    possible for end users to install and use. So, this is not intended to start
    any kind of competition or flame-war, mostly I'm just curious...

    When I see the statement "most of us are unix users, there are some windows
    users" it makes me wonder whether or not this is really true. I'm involved
    in two major cross-platform Ruby projects: FreeRIDE and wxRuby. In both
    cases the windows downloads are higher than all the other platforms
    combined.

    It would be interesting if there was a more reliable way to gauge Ruby's use
    on various platforms, but I don't know how that could be done.

    Curt
     
    Curt Hibbs, Oct 27, 2004
    #15
  16. trans. (T. Onoma) wrote:
    > On Wednesday 27 October 2004 10:48 am, Howard Lewis Ship wrote:
    > | I tried using the basic Ruby for windows package and got a few
    > | mysterious errors ("readline.dll not found" when running irb).
    > |
    > | I backed that out and used Cygwin to install ruby. Now it runs perfectly.
    > |
    > | I was able to install RubyGems and start exploring that as well. It
    > | didn't work with the "native" Ruby, but is completely seamless (to my
    > | cursory examination) when using Ruby under Cygwin.
    > |
    > | Cygwin, by explantion, is a POSIX layer on top of Windows. It adds
    > | aptget/rpm type functionality ... you download a small installer and
    > | it downloads package descriptions for all the (Li|U)nixy stuff. It
    > | handles downloading, installing, versioning, dependencies.
    > |
    > | http://www.cygwin.com/
    >
    >
    > Are there downsides to this approach for Windows users?


    Cygwin adds a something like a gnu/linux/posix layer between the
    application and Windows, therefore not all "features" of Windows are
    easily accessible and sometimes performance suffers. From a
    Windows-user point of view sometimes unexpected effects may happen
    because of the different semantics of the 2 worlds, eg: file system
    permissions (Windows ACL's vs. POSIX bits within cygwin and the
    translation between them).

    cygwin itself is convinient to install and maintain.

    Gruß
    Jan
     
    Jan Krüger, Oct 27, 2004
    #16
  17. My background is Java, which is typically "build on windows, deploy on
    *nix". So, for me, just getting Ruby and RubyGems set up is enough;
    I'll worry about deployment and licensing after I've actually written
    some code.


    On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 00:39:41 +0900, Jan Krüger <> wrote:
    > trans. (T. Onoma) wrote:
    >
    >
    > > On Wednesday 27 October 2004 10:48 am, Howard Lewis Ship wrote:
    > > | I tried using the basic Ruby for windows package and got a few
    > > | mysterious errors ("readline.dll not found" when running irb).
    > > |
    > > | I backed that out and used Cygwin to install ruby. Now it runs perfectly.
    > > |
    > > | I was able to install RubyGems and start exploring that as well. It
    > > | didn't work with the "native" Ruby, but is completely seamless (to my
    > > | cursory examination) when using Ruby under Cygwin.
    > > |
    > > | Cygwin, by explantion, is a POSIX layer on top of Windows. It adds
    > > | aptget/rpm type functionality ... you download a small installer and
    > > | it downloads package descriptions for all the (Li|U)nixy stuff. It
    > > | handles downloading, installing, versioning, dependencies.
    > > |
    > > | http://www.cygwin.com/
    > >
    > >
    > > Are there downsides to this approach for Windows users?

    >
    > Cygwin adds a something like a gnu/linux/posix layer between the
    > application and Windows, therefore not all "features" of Windows are
    > easily accessible and sometimes performance suffers. From a
    > Windows-user point of view sometimes unexpected effects may happen
    > because of the different semantics of the 2 worlds, eg: file system
    > permissions (Windows ACL's vs. POSIX bits within cygwin and the
    > translation between them).
    >
    > cygwin itself is convinient to install and maintain.
    >
    > Gruß
    > Jan
    >
    >



    --
    Howard M. Lewis Ship
    Independent J2EE / Open-Source Java Consultant
    Creator, Jakarta Tapestry
    Creator, Jakarta HiveMind
    http://howardlewisship.com
     
    Howard Lewis Ship, Oct 27, 2004
    #17
  18. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    Matt Mower Guest

    Hi David,

    On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 00:03:14 +0900, David Ross <> wrote:
    > Would you be willing to help me package binaries for RPA? :) I can help
    > you re-learn if needed.
    >


    If you can put up with teaching me I would be happy to contribute some
    of my spare time to this effort. Contact me in #ruby-lang.

    Regards,

    Matt
     
    Matt Mower, Oct 27, 2004
    #18
  19. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    David Ross Guest

    Re: Unix vs Windows [was: The real Ruby vs. Python.]

    Curt Hibbs wrote:

    >David Ross wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Binary releases are sometimes a problem, most of us are unix users,
    >>there are some windows users.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >I am a big proponent of being cross-platform *and* making things as easy as
    >possible for end users to install and use. So, this is not intended to start
    >any kind of competition or flame-war, mostly I'm just curious...
    >
    >When I see the statement "most of us are unix users, there are some windows
    >users" it makes me wonder whether or not this is really true. I'm involved
    >in two major cross-platform Ruby projects: FreeRIDE and wxRuby. In both
    >cases the windows downloads are higher than all the other platforms
    >combined.
    >
    >It would be interesting if there was a more reliable way to gauge Ruby's use
    >on various platforms, but I don't know how that could be done.
    >
    >Curt
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    I don't have anything against windows, but now I will get a team
    together and have a group of people build binaries for windows users,
    now it consists of lypanov and me. Soon we shall have a binary
    revolution. To the Ruby Republic!

    David Ross
    --
    Hazzle free packages for Ruby?
    RPA is available from http://www.rubyarchive.org/
     
    David Ross, Oct 27, 2004
    #19
  20. Abe Vionas_MailingList

    David Ross Guest

    Re: Gems as key? Re: The real Ruby vs. Python.

    Its Me wrote:

    >"Abe Vionas_MailingList" <> wrote
    >
    >
    >
    >>What it comes down to is what it's coming down to for
    >>me... platform maturity.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >This bites me quite often as well, though I have not given up. There are
    >likely hordes of unwashed masses like me, not entirely adept at
    >source-patch-recompile-rebuild, who never even get started with Ruby because
    >of the kinds of issues Abe describes.
    >
    >Their loss or Ruby's? Unfortunately, probably both.
    >
    >I feel gems is one of the keys to getting past this. Gems can make my local
    >(Windows) Ruby install feel like
    > - a single plug-in system
    > - pulling together 'requires'
    > - incorporating documentation from a single starting point
    > - including compatible versions and dependencies
    >
    >It would be great if gems was part of the standard Ruby distribution, if RPA
    >could use gems as its underlying package manager (reducing confusion for
    >newBs), and if RPA could then also take on the role of Release Manager for
    >Ruby itself.
    >
    >Some misc thoughts:
    >
    >- Could gems ALSO cover binaries AND binary/library dependencies?
    >
    >- Could the gems RDOCs have links to some gems-aligned community
    >documentation site, as someone else proposed here recently?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    RPA and RubyGems have different aspects in implementation, so it would
    not be compatible/easy. Now that I have a RPA QA team for windows, we
    should have binaries put together soon. Good support for software. :)

    David Ross
    --
    Hazzle free packages for Ruby?
    RPA is available from http://www.rubyarchive.org/
     
    David Ross, Oct 27, 2004
    #20
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