TIming

Discussion in 'Python' started by WIdgeteye, May 30, 2006.

  1. WIdgeteye

    WIdgeteye Guest

    HI,
    I am trying to write a little program that will run a program on
    scedule. I am having trouble understanding the datetime, time, sched
    modules. What I would like is something like this:

    If date&time = 06-13-2006:18:00:00
    Then run this program

    I am not sure how to enter a future date in this equation using any
    of the modules mentioned above. I have figured out how to get the date
    and time from the modules above but not the future and then compare
    the two.

    Any help appreciated.

    Thanks
    WIdgeteye, May 30, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. WIdgeteye

    Tim Roberts Guest

    WIdgeteye <> wrote:
    >HI,
    >I am trying to write a little program that will run a program on
    >scedule. I am having trouble understanding the datetime, time, sched
    >modules. What I would like is something like this:
    >
    >If date&time = 06-13-2006:18:00:00
    >Then run this program
    >
    >I am not sure how to enter a future date in this equation using any
    >of the modules mentioned above. I have figured out how to get the date
    >and time from the modules above but not the future and then compare
    >the two.


    What operating system are you using? Both Linux and Windows have commands
    that can do this for you. It's more efficient to use existing operating
    system services than to invent your own.

    Also, remember to take into account the possibility that your program might
    not check the time at the exact second. In your example, you need to be
    prepared to start your app if the time is just PAST 6 PM on June 13.
    --
    - Tim Roberts,
    Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.
    Tim Roberts, May 30, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. WIdgeteye

    WIdgeteye Guest

    On Tue, 30 May 2006 04:34:03 +0000, Tim Roberts wrote:

    > WIdgeteye <> wrote:
    >>HI,
    >>I am trying to write a little program that will run a program on scedule.
    >>I am having trouble understanding the datetime, time, sched modules. What
    >>I would like is something like this:
    >>
    >>If date&time = 06-13-2006:18:00:00
    >>Then run this program
    >>
    >>I am not sure how to enter a future date in this equation using any of
    >>the modules mentioned above. I have figured out how to get the date and
    >>time from the modules above but not the future and then compare the two.

    >
    > What operating system are you using? Both Linux and Windows have commands
    > that can do this for you. It's more efficient to use existing operating
    > system services than to invent your own.
    >
    > Also, remember to take into account the possibility that your program
    > might not check the time at the exact second. In your example, you need
    > to be prepared to start your app if the time is just PAST 6 PM on June 13.


    I am using Linux and could use cron. But I want to be able to
    schedule and record television shows on her. And yeah I know about
    freevo but it's way to complicated than it needs to be.

    So back to the question: How can I get a 9 position tuple from
    the time functions in Python based on a future date.

    Thanks.
    WIdgeteye, May 30, 2006
    #3
  4. Tue, 2006-05-30 at 00:23 -0500, WIdgeteye wrote:
    > On Tue, 30 May 2006 04:34:03 +0000, Tim Roberts wrote:
    >
    > > WIdgeteye <> wrote:
    > >>HI,
    > >>I am trying to write a little program that will run a program on scedule.
    > >>I am having trouble understanding the datetime, time, sched modules. What
    > >>I would like is something like this:
    > >>
    > >>If date&time = 06-13-2006:18:00:00
    > >>Then run this program
    > >>
    > >>I am not sure how to enter a future date in this equation using any of
    > >>the modules mentioned above. I have figured out how to get the date and
    > >>time from the modules above but not the future and then compare the two.

    > >
    > > What operating system are you using? Both Linux and Windows have commands
    > > that can do this for you. It's more efficient to use existing operating
    > > system services than to invent your own.
    > >
    > > Also, remember to take into account the possibility that your program
    > > might not check the time at the exact second. In your example, you need
    > > to be prepared to start your app if the time is just PAST 6 PM on June 13.

    >
    > I am using Linux and could use cron. But I want to be able to
    > schedule and record television shows on her. And yeah I know about
    > freevo but it's way to complicated than it needs to be.
    >
    > So back to the question: How can I get a 9 position tuple from
    > the time functions in Python based on a future date.


    Tim Roberts is right. As you are on linux, I suggest you investigate
    the at command - very user friendly and not at all complicated.






    --
    This message has been scanned for viruses and
    dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
    believed to be clean.
    John McMonagle, May 30, 2006
    #4
  5. WIdgeteye wrote:
    > HI,
    > I am trying to write a little program that will run a program on
    > scedule.


    <ot>
    There are usually existing programs to do so on most platforms (cron on
    *n*x, the Windows scheduler, etc).
    </ot>

    --
    bruno desthuilliers
    python -c "print '@'.join(['.'.join([w[::-1] for w in p.split('.')]) for
    p in ''.split('@')])"
    bruno at modulix, May 30, 2006
    #5
  6. WIdgeteye

    WIdgeteye Guest

    On Tue, 30 May 2006 16:15:44 +1000, John McMonagle wrote:

    > Tue, 2006-05-30 at 00:23 -0500, WIdgeteye wrote:
    >> On Tue, 30 May 2006 04:34:03 +0000, Tim Roberts wrote:
    >>
    >> > WIdgeteye <> wrote:
    >> >>HI,
    >> >>I am trying to write a little program that will run a program on
    >> >>scedule. I am having trouble understanding the datetime, time, sched
    >> >>modules. What I would like is something like this:
    >> >>
    >> >>If date&time = 06-13-2006:18:00:00
    >> >>Then run this program
    >> >>
    >> >>I am not sure how to enter a future date in this equation using any of
    >> >>the modules mentioned above. I have figured out how to get the date
    >> >>and time from the modules above but not the future and then compare
    >> >>the two.
    >> >
    >> > What operating system are you using? Both Linux and Windows have
    >> > commands that can do this for you. It's more efficient to use
    >> > existing operating system services than to invent your own.
    >> >
    >> > Also, remember to take into account the possibility that your program
    >> > might not check the time at the exact second. In your example, you
    >> > need to be prepared to start your app if the time is just PAST 6 PM on
    >> > June 13.

    >>
    >> I am using Linux and could use cron. But I want to be able to schedule
    >> and record television shows on her. And yeah I know about freevo but
    >> it's way to complicated than it needs to be.
    >>
    >> So back to the question: How can I get a 9 position tuple from the time
    >> functions in Python based on a future date.

    >
    > Tim Roberts is right. As you are on linux, I suggest you investigate the
    > at command - very user friendly and not at all complicated.



    I have been using Slackware for over 10 years I know all about the
    commands on the OS.
    If you guys don't have an answer to the question just say so. But don't
    give me suggestions on how to use an OS I have been using most likely
    longer than 90% of the people using linux today.

    This is the comp.lang.python news group not the linux news group. If I
    didn't want to write the Python code and I wanted to use the OS commands
    instead I would.

    Python is cross platform. Linux is not. I intend to release the software
    to the general public someday when it is done. I want it cross platform.

    BTW in the time it took me NOT to get an answer for my question in this so
    called Python NG, I figured it out for myself.

    This PYTHON NG blows to high heaven. Whats worse, the answers I got were
    most likely from people who know SQUAT about Python scripting. That's why
    they gave me such lame fucking answers.

    Idiots.
    WIdgeteye, May 30, 2006
    #6
  7. WIdgeteye wrote:
    > <Osome rude drivel>

    Thank you very much for your participation.

    --Scott David Daniels
    Scott David Daniels, May 30, 2006
    #7
  8. WIdgeteye

    Guest

    , May 30, 2006
    #8
  9. WIdgeteye

    John Machin Guest

    On 31/05/2006 5:50 AM, WIdgeteye wrote:

    >
    > This PYTHON NG blows to high heaven. Whats worse, the answers I got were
    > most likely from people who know SQUAT about Python scripting. That's why
    > they gave me such lame [expletive deleted] answers.
    >
    > Idiots.


    Kindly refer back to your post of almost two years ago:

    http://groups.google.com/group/comp...hor: WIdgeteye&rnum=17&hl=en#d0e5efc00c1b5359

    """Arg! That was it, now I really feel stupid. """
    John Machin, May 31, 2006
    #9
  10. WIdgeteye

    John Bokma Guest

    John Bokma, May 31, 2006
    #10
  11. WIdgeteye

    Tim Roberts Guest

    WIdgeteye <> wrote:

    >On Tue, 30 May 2006 16:15:44 +1000, John McMonagle wrote:
    >
    >> Tim Roberts is right. As you are on linux, I suggest you investigate the
    >> at command - very user friendly and not at all complicated.

    >
    >I have been using Slackware for over 10 years I know all about the
    >commands on the OS.
    >
    >If you guys don't have an answer to the question just say so. But don't
    >give me suggestions on how to use an OS I have been using most likely
    >longer than 90% of the people using linux today.
    >
    >This is the comp.lang.python news group not the linux news group. If I
    >didn't want to write the Python code and I wanted to use the OS commands
    >instead I would.


    Utter nonsense. If someone posted on comp.lang.python that they wanted to
    know how to write a DMA-based PCI driver in Python, I am sure as heck going
    to tell them that there are better tools for the job and better newsgroups
    for the question.

    >Python is cross platform. Linux is not. I intend to release the software
    >to the general public someday when it is done. I want it cross platform.


    Windows also has an "at" command.

    However, you are not going to be able to write a television-based
    application that is cross platform. The video tools are just too
    different.

    >BTW in the time it took me NOT to get an answer for my question in this so
    >called Python NG, I figured it out for myself.


    That's almost always the case with newsgroups. They are NOT a real-time
    medium.

    >This PYTHON NG blows to high heaven. Whats worse, the answers I got were
    >most likely from people who know SQUAT about Python scripting. That's why
    >they gave me such lame fucking answers.


    We did not give you "lame fucking answers". We gave you solutions to the
    problem you posed. If the problem statement wasn't clear enough, that
    isn't our fault.

    >Idiots.


    It takes one to know one.
    --
    - Tim Roberts,
    Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.
    Tim Roberts, Jun 1, 2006
    #11
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Kieran Francisco

    Timing Diagram to HDL Translation

    Kieran Francisco, Sep 8, 2003, in forum: VHDL
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    1,289
    VhdlCohen
    Sep 17, 2003
  2. Kload

    Strange Timing Problem

    Kload, Oct 23, 2003, in forum: VHDL
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    587
    Kload
    Oct 23, 2003
  3. Kload
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    551
    John_H
    Oct 23, 2003
  4. ramzi
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    518
    ramzi
    Nov 1, 2003
  5. guille
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    574
    guille
    Dec 19, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page