tool for defining informal markup languages ?

Discussion in 'XML' started by r.shimmin@gmail.com, Sep 14, 2005.

  1. Guest

    There exist a number of related informal markup languages whose design
    philosophy is to use terse, easily human-entered and human-read tags,
    that are intended to be converted by software into some flavour of SGML
    or XML. The markup languages used for editing on many wikis are the
    most prominent examples.

    Can anyone tell me whether there exists a tool that would allow me to
    define such a language, and the xml elements that the "informal"
    elements are intended to represent, and emit, say, a perl script for
    converting documents written in the informal into XML documents.
     
    , Sep 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. Stefan Ram Guest

    writes:
    >Can anyone tell me whether there exists a tool that would allow
    >me to define such a language,


    To define such a language, a specification would have to be
    written for its syntax and semantics. This requires a pencil
    or a text editor or so.

    >and the xml elements that the "informal" elements are intended
    >to represent, and emit, say, a perl script for converting
    >documents written in the informal into XML documents.


    A major part of the work should be making the design decisions
    and writing the specification.

    The best approach might be to use one of the existing
    plain-text-markup-languages. If the source code for a
    converter is available for them, it might be used and
    modified to derive a similar language.

    The plain-text-markup-languages I am aware of are:

    http://docutils.sourceforge.net/rst.html
    http://www.python.org/sigs/doc-sig/stext.html
    http://textism.com/tools/textile/
    http://www.textism.com/tools/textile/
    http://tikiwiki.org/tiki-print.php?page=RFCWiki
    http://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/
    http://www.maplefish.com/todd/aft.html
    http://www.xmlmind.com/aptconvert.html

    From the viewpoint of computer science, any plain-text
    markup language is a "formal language".
     
    Stefan Ram, Sep 14, 2005
    #2
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