Truth Seeker

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Happy Man, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. Happy Man

    Happy Man Guest

    Truth Seeker

    http://www.thisistruth.org/truth.php?f=TruthSeeker


    No one is compelled to accept the truth, but it is certainly a shame
    upon the human intellect when a man is not even interested in
    findingout what the truth is!


    Islam teaches that our Creator has given human beings the faculty of
    reason. Therefore, it is incumbent upon them to reason things out
    objectively and systematically for themselves to ponder, to question
    and to reflect.


    Nobody should press you to make a hasty decision to accept any of the
    teachings of Islam, for Islam teaches that human beings should be
    given the freedom to choose. Even when a person is faced with the
    truth, there is no compulsion upon him to embrace it.


    But before you begin to form an opinion about Islam, ask yourself
    whether your existing knowledge about it is thorough enough. Ask
    yourself whether that knowledge has been obtained through third party
    sources who themselves have probably been exposed to only random
    glimpses of Islamic writings and have yet to reason out on Islam
    objectively and systematically themselves.


    Is it fair enough that one should form an opinion about the taste of
    a
    particular dish just by a mere hearsay from others who may themselves
    have not necessarily tasted the dish yet?


    Similarly you should find out for yourself about Islam from reliable
    sources and not only taste it, but rather digest it very well before
    you form an opinion of it. That would be an intellectual approach to
    the truth.


    In making your next move to the truth, Islam continually reassures
    you
    that your rights to freedom of choice and freedom to use that God-
    given faculty of thought and reason will be respected, for everyone
    has that individual will. No one else can take away that will and
    force you to submit to the true way of your Creator, you have to find
    out and make that decision yourself!


    May your intellectual journey towards the truth be a pleasant and
    fruitful one... Amen
     
    Happy Man, Mar 11, 2007
    #1
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  2. Happy Man

    arnuld Guest

    any views on this algorithms book

    hai all,

    i am a beginner at algorithms. i was checking ACCU and this one caught
    my attention:

    "Introduction to Computing and Algorithms" -- Russell Shackelford


    had anybody read this book ?
     
    arnuld, Mar 11, 2007
    #2
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  3. Happy Man

    Guest

    Re: any views on this algorithms book

    On Mar 11, 12:03 pm, "arnuld" <> wrote:
    > hai all,
    >
    > i am a beginner at algorithms. i was checking ACCU and this one caught
    > my attention:
    >
    > "Introduction to Computing and Algorithms" -- Russell Shackelford
    >
    > had anybody read this book ?


    I thing D. E. Knuth, "Art of computer programming" is the best book
    I've seen on algorithms - it's very thorough. Can't say I've *quite*
    read the whole thing yet, but little by little!
     
    , Mar 11, 2007
    #3
  4. Happy Man

    arnuld Guest

    Re: any views on this algorithms book

    > On Mar 11, 6:37 pm, wrote:


    > I thing D. E. Knuth, "Art of computer programming" is the best book
    > I've seen on algorithms - it's very thorough. Can't say I've *quite*
    > read the whole thing yet, but little by little!


    he is quite *academic*. i *forgot* to mention that academic books
    never made any sense to me. i know Knuth's books are best out there. i
    never read his books actually, except Concrete Mathematics.

    i have also heard "Sedgwick" is academic too. i expected so as he
    studies under Knuth.


    another example of academic books is "How to Design Programs" [1]. i
    have that book on my desk and i tried to get "introduction to
    programming" through it (the purpose of the authors was introduction
    to programming) and after reading 11 chapters, i did not make anything
    out of that book.

    same way i tried "The Little Schemer" as introduction but that too was
    thrown into my "Hate'em" list. [2]

    guess, from where i got my introduction to programming: from 2 places

    1.) How to think like a computer scientist: learning with Python.
    (this was a minor intro) [3]
    2.) "Practical Common Lisp" (this one had major impact on my
    thinking) [4]

    i like and understand books written in "Practical Common Lisp" style.

    K&R2 is a different style i love it too :)

    so "Practical Common Lisp" and "K&R2" are 2 of my understood and loved
    styles.


    log post, sorry....

    still the question remains:

    have you read "Introduction to Computing and Algorithms" -- Russell
    Shackelford

    ?


    -- arnuld
    http://arnuld.blogspot.com


    [1] http://www.htdp.org/

    [2] http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/matthias/BTLS/

    [3] http://www.ibiblio.org/obp/thinkCSpy/

    [4] http://www.gigamonkeys.com/book/
     
    arnuld, Mar 11, 2007
    #4
  5. Re: any views on this algorithms book

    "arnuld" <> writes:
    > i am a beginner at algorithms. i was checking ACCU and this one caught
    > my attention:
    >
    > "Introduction to Computing and Algorithms" -- Russell Shackelford


    arnuld, you posted this as a followup to a spam. If you want to start
    a new thread, don't create it as a followup to another article; the
    "References:" header still makes it part of the original thread even
    if you change the subject.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    "We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
    -- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
     
    Keith Thompson, Mar 11, 2007
    #5
  6. Happy Man

    santosh Guest

    Re: any views on this algorithms book

    Keith Thompson wrote:
    > "arnuld" <> writes:
    > > i am a beginner at algorithms. i was checking ACCU and this one caught
    > > my attention:
    > >
    > > "Introduction to Computing and Algorithms" -- Russell Shackelford

    >
    > arnuld, you posted this as a followup to a spam. If you want to start
    > a new thread, don't create it as a followup to another article; the
    > "References:" header still makes it part of the original thread even
    > if you change the subject.


    I think he was trying to follow Beej Jorgensen's example elsethread,
    in trying to "hijack" a spam thread.
     
    santosh, Mar 11, 2007
    #6
  7. Happy Man

    arnuld Guest

    Re: any views on this algorithms book

    > On Mar 11, 8:36 pm, Keith Thompson <> wrote:
    > "arnuld" <> writes:
    > > i am a beginner at algorithms. i was checking ACCU and this one caught
    > > my attention:

    >
    > > "Introduction to Computing and Algorithms" -- Russell Shackelford

    >
    > arnuld, you posted this as a followup to a spam. If you want to start
    > a new thread, don't create it as a followup to another article; the
    > "References:" header still makes it part of the original thread even
    > if you change the subject.


    thanks Keith, i did not know that.
     
    arnuld, Mar 11, 2007
    #7
  8. Happy Man

    arnuld Guest

    Re: any views on this algorithms book

    > On Mar 11, 8:56 pm, "santosh" <> wrote:


    > I think he was trying to follow Beej Jorgensen's example elsethread,


    i don't know who is "Beej Jorgensen"

    > in trying to "hijack" a spam thread.


    YES, i amtrying to Hijack the spam-thread :)

    but as advised by Kieth Thompson, it is not a good idea. I have
    created a new thread for the same question.
     
    arnuld, Mar 11, 2007
    #8
  9. Re: any views on this algorithms book

    arnuld <> wrote:
    >i don't know who is "Beej Jorgensen"


    Just some average Joe.

    I picked a up a copy of "Introduction to Algorithms" by Cormen,
    Leiserson, and Rivest. It's a thick volume (~1000 pages), but I find it
    fairly easy to read and my used copy of the first edition was purchased
    for US$13.

    My only gripe is that the authors are tight-lipped about the solutions
    to the problems, and I always like to find out if I've done something
    wrong. (They know the book is used in many classes, so they don't want
    to give away the answers to the students.)

    (My other only gripe is that it's "only" 1000 pages, and I wish there
    was more in there!)

    I'd classify the reading of "Introduction to Algorithms" as "an
    experience", and the reading of Knuth's AoCP to be "an undertaking".
    But I can't claim to be a natural at reading that kind of stuff!
    Nevertheless, all these volumes are on my shelf and all get picked
    through from time to time.

    I also have a C book called "Fundamentals of Data Structures in C" by
    Horowitz, Sahni, and Anderson-Freed, 1993. This is a book I had in
    school and I haven't cracked it in a long time, but I must have thought
    it was worth keeping back then. Thumbing through the section on minimum
    spanning trees, the text seems pretty decent.

    (I see it's selling for US$100 on Amazon, so I guess at the very least
    it was worth keeping as an investment. Take THAT, student bookstore
    buyback program! ;)

    It gets 3/5 stars on Amazon, with one reviewer complaining, "This book
    gets way too caught up in mathematical terminology and offers too few
    actual code examples."

    Which is interesting to me, since it's one of the least-mathy algorithm
    books I have. (A quick sample showed 30% of the pages had some kind of
    math on them, whereas a similar sample of "Introduction to Algorithms"
    showed 100% of the pages with math. As for Knuth, I think all the pages
    have math, and maybe 30% of the pages have some kind of English. ;)

    -Beej
     
    Beej Jorgensen, Mar 11, 2007
    #9
  10. Re: any views on this algorithms book

    "arnuld" <> writes:
    >> On Mar 11, 8:36 pm, Keith Thompson <> wrote:
    >> "arnuld" <> writes:
    >> > i am a beginner at algorithms. i was checking ACCU and this one caught
    >> > my attention:

    >>
    >> > "Introduction to Computing and Algorithms" -- Russell Shackelford

    >>
    >> arnuld, you posted this as a followup to a spam. If you want to start
    >> a new thread, don't create it as a followup to another article; the
    >> "References:" header still makes it part of the original thread even
    >> if you change the subject.

    >
    > thanks Keith, i did not know that.


    It's an easy enough mistake to make. Some newsreaders, mostly older
    ones, do threading by subject rather than by "References:" headers,
    and wouldn't have shown your response as part of the same thread. And
    if I hadn't happened to see both the spam and your followup in the
    same session, I wouldn't have noticed it myself.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    "We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this."
    -- Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn, "Yes Minister"
     
    Keith Thompson, Mar 11, 2007
    #10
  11. Happy Man

    Ben Pfaff Guest

    Re: any views on this algorithms book

    Beej Jorgensen <> writes:

    > I picked a up a copy of "Introduction to Algorithms" by Cormen,
    > Leiserson, and Rivest. It's a thick volume (~1000 pages), but I find it
    > fairly easy to read and my used copy of the first edition was purchased
    > for US$13.
    >
    > My only gripe is that the authors are tight-lipped about the solutions
    > to the problems, and I always like to find out if I've done something
    > wrong. (They know the book is used in many classes, so they don't want
    > to give away the answers to the students.)


    Because it's used in so many classes, you can search for
    solutions online and usually find a few to compare to your own.

    Personally, I've used some of the chapters so much (e.g. binary
    heaps) that I've actually penciled in solutions to exercises so
    that I don't have to re-solve them when I need to write code.
    --
    "Am I missing something?"
    --Dan Pop
     
    Ben Pfaff, Mar 11, 2007
    #11
  12. Re: any views on this algorithms book

    "Beej Jorgensen" <> wrote in message
    >
    > Just some average Joe.
    >
    > I picked a up a copy of "Introduction to Algorithms" by Cormen,
    > Leiserson, and Rivest. It's a thick volume (~1000 pages), but I find it
    > fairly easy to read and my used copy of the first edition was purchased
    > for US$13.
    >
    > My only gripe is that the authors are tight-lipped about the solutions
    > to the problems, and I always like to find out if I've done something
    > wrong. (They know the book is used in many classes, so they don't want
    > to give away the answers to the students.)
    >
    > (My other only gripe is that it's "only" 1000 pages, and I wish there
    > was more in there!)
    >
    > I'd classify the reading of "Introduction to Algorithms" as "an
    > experience", and the reading of Knuth's AoCP to be "an undertaking".
    > But I can't claim to be a natural at reading that kind of stuff!
    > Nevertheless, all these volumes are on my shelf and all get picked
    > through from time to time.
    >
    > I also have a C book called "Fundamentals of Data Structures in C" by
    > Horowitz, Sahni, and Anderson-Freed, 1993. This is a book I had in
    > school and I haven't cracked it in a long time, but I must have thought
    > it was worth keeping back then. Thumbing through the section on minimum
    > spanning trees, the text seems pretty decent.
    >
    > (I see it's selling for US$100 on Amazon, so I guess at the very least
    > it was worth keeping as an investment. Take THAT, student bookstore
    > buyback program! ;)
    >
    > It gets 3/5 stars on Amazon, with one reviewer complaining, "This book
    > gets way too caught up in mathematical terminology and offers too few
    > actual code examples."
    >
    > Which is interesting to me, since it's one of the least-mathy algorithm
    > books I have. (A quick sample showed 30% of the pages had some kind of
    > math on them, whereas a similar sample of "Introduction to Algorithms"
    > showed 100% of the pages with math. As for Knuth, I think all the pages
    > have math, and maybe 30% of the pages have some kind of English. ;)
    >

    I am writing an algorithms book.
    My policy has been to try to explain the maths in English, and then provide
    complete working implementations of every function. Most of my algorithms
    are not very numerical in nature, but it is difficult to avoid all maths.
    Graphical routines need elementary geometry, for instance, and matrix
    inversion leads you into deep waters.

    I am very interested in what people want from an algorithms book.
    Particularly if it cannot be obtained from elsewhere.
    --
    Free games and programming goodies.
    http://www.personal.leeds.ac.uk/~bgy1mm
     
    Malcolm McLean, Mar 11, 2007
    #12
  13. Re: any views on this algorithms book

    On 11 Mar 2007 09:00:36 -0700, in comp.lang.c , "arnuld"
    <> wrote:

    >YES, i amtrying to Hijack the spam-thread :)


    Don't do that. Many people have spamfilters which will delete unread
    spam, if you post nonspam to the thread it may defeat the filter and
    force them to read the nonsense.
    --
    Mark McIntyre

    "Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
    Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are,
    by definition, not smart enough to debug it."
    --Brian Kernighan
     
    Mark McIntyre, Mar 11, 2007
    #13
  14. Happy Man wrote:

    > Truth Seeker
    >
    > http://www.thisistruth.org/truth.php?f=TruthSeeker


    As an alternative:

    http://www.news.faithfreedom.org/

    Erik
    --
    +-----------------------------------------------------------+
    Erik de Castro Lopo
    +-----------------------------------------------------------+
    "Re graphics: A picture is worth 10K words - but only those to
    describe the picture. Hardly any sets of 10K words can be
    adequately described with pictures." -- Alan Perlis
     
    Erik de Castro Lopo, Mar 12, 2007
    #14
  15. Happy Man

    Guest

    Re: any views on this algorithms book

    On Mar 11, 2:06 pm, "arnuld" <> wrote:
    > > On Mar 11, 6:37 pm, wrote:
    > > I thing D. E. Knuth, "Art of computer programming" is the best book
    > > I've seen on algorithms - it's very thorough. Can't say I've *quite*
    > > read the whole thing yet, but little by little!

    >
    > he is quite *academic*. i *forgot* to mention that academic books
    > never made any sense to me. i know Knuth's books are best out there. i
    > never read his books actually, except Concrete Mathematics.
    >
    > i have also heard "Sedgwick" is academic too. i expected so as he
    > studies under Knuth.


    I never really understand this point of view. If you're not going to
    look at algorithms "academically" and understand the math, how are you
    ever going to be able to decide whether an algorithm is good or bad in
    a given situation?

    > another example of academic books is "How to Design Programs" [1]. i
    > have that book on my desk and i tried to get "introduction to
    > programming" through it (the purpose of the authors was introduction
    > to programming) and after reading 11 chapters, i did not make anything
    > out of that book.
    >
    > same way i tried "The Little Schemer" as introduction but that too was
    > thrown into my "Hate'em" list. [2]
    >
    > guess, from where i got my introduction to programming: from 2 places
    >
    > 1.) How to think like a computer scientist: learning with Python.
    > (this was a minor intro) [3]
    > 2.) "Practical Common Lisp" (this one had major impact on my
    > thinking) [4]
    >
    > i like and understand books written in "Practical Common Lisp" style.
    >
    > K&R2 is a different style i love it too :)
    >
    > so "Practical Common Lisp" and "K&R2" are 2 of my understood and loved
    > styles.
    >
    > log post, sorry....
    >
    > still the question remains:
    >
    > have you read "Introduction to Computing and Algorithms" -- Russell
    > Shackelford
    >
    > ?
    >
    > -- arnuldhttp://arnuld.blogspot.com
    >
    > [1]http://www.htdp.org/
    >
    > [2]http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/matthias/BTLS/
    >
    > [3]http://www.ibiblio.org/obp/thinkCSpy/
    >
    > [4]http://www.gigamonkeys.com/book/
     
    , Mar 12, 2007
    #15
  16. Happy Man

    CBFalconer Guest

    Re: any views on this algorithms book

    wrote:
    > On Mar 11, 2:06 pm, "arnuld" <> wrote:
    >> On Mar 11, 6:37 pm, wrote:
    >>
    >>> I thing D. E. Knuth, "Art of computer programming" is the best
    >>> book I've seen on algorithms - it's very thorough. Can't say
    >>> I've *quite* read the whole thing yet, but little by little!

    >>
    >> he is quite *academic*. i *forgot* to mention that academic
    >> books never made any sense to me. i know Knuth's books are best
    >> out there. i never read his books actually, except Concrete
    >> Mathematics.
    >>
    >> i have also heard "Sedgwick" is academic too. i expected so as
    >> he studies under Knuth.

    >
    > I never really understand this point of view. If you're not going
    > to look at algorithms "academically" and understand the math, how
    > are you ever going to be able to decide whether an algorithm is
    > good or bad in a given situation?


    I think you want "The Practice of Programming".

    --
    Chuck F (cbfalconer at maineline dot net)
    Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
    <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>



    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    CBFalconer, Mar 12, 2007
    #16
  17. Happy Man

    CBFalconer Guest

    CBFalconer, Mar 12, 2007
    #17
  18. Happy Man

    goose Guest

    [still OT] Re: Truth Seeker

    On 2007-03-12, CBFalconer <> wrote:
    > Erik de Castro Lopo wrote:
    >> Happy Man wrote:
    >>
    >>> Truth Seeker
    >>>
    >>> http://munged

    >>
    >> As an alternative:
    >>
    >> http://munged

    >
    > Please do not feed the troll.
    >


    If you had the time to respond to the message, you
    didn't *really* have to leave the links intact, did
    you?

    --
    Lelanthran Manickum
    |Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent.
    | -- Salvor Hardin
     
    goose, Mar 13, 2007
    #18
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