Trying to locate a standard XML schema

Discussion in 'XML' started by trek, Jan 23, 2004.

  1. trek

    trek Guest

    Good evening,

    I am trying to locate a standard (commonly accepted) XML schema for
    managing documents. What want to know is if someone has already
    created an XML schema for describing the pertinent data about a
    journal article (title, author(s), journal name, publication date,
    etc).

    If anyone can help me out here, I'd really appreciate it. You can
    email me at trekcelt @ yahoo.com.

    Thanks.

    -trek
    trek, Jan 23, 2004
    #1
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  2. trek wrote:
    > Good evening,
    >
    > I am trying to locate a standard (commonly accepted) XML schema for
    > managing documents. What want to know is if someone has already
    > created an XML schema for describing the pertinent data about a
    > journal article (title, author(s), journal name, publication date,
    > etc).


    Have a look at PRISM.
    --
    Johannes Koch
    In te domine speravi; non confundar in aeternum.
    (Te Deum, 4th cent.)
    Johannes Koch, Jan 23, 2004
    #2
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  3. >>>>> "trek" == trek <> writes:

    trek> Good evening, I am trying to locate a standard (commonly accepted) XML
    trek> schema for managing documents. What want to know is if someone has
    trek> already created an XML schema for describing the pertinent data about
    trek> a journal article (title, author(s), journal name, publication date,
    trek> etc).

    Docbook has a XSD version also. Check http://www.docbook.org for more
    information.
    --
    Arto V. Viitanen
    University of Tampere, Department of Computer Sciences
    Tampere, Finland http://www.cs.uta.fi/~av/
    Arto V. Viitanen, Jan 23, 2004
    #3
  4. trek

    Andrew-J2000 Guest

    I would use 'Dublin Core' (http://dublincore.org) wrapped in '*RDF*
    (http://dublincore.org/documents/2002/07/31/dcmes-xml/). Howeve
    alternativey 'heres some Guidelines for implementing Dublin Core i
    XML' (http://dublincore.org/documents/dc-xml-guidelines/) .

    If your unsure, which schema to use have a look at www.xml.org, whic
    displays 'Schemas by taxonomy' (http://www.xml.org/xml/registry.jsp

    Andrew-J200
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    Andrew-J2000, Jan 23, 2004
    #4
  5. trek

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 22 Jan 2004 21:01:18 -0800, (trek) wrote:

    >I am trying to locate a standard (commonly accepted) XML schema for
    >managing documents.


    There isn't one (yes, this is rather a poor situation).

    What you should do depends very much on your market and your target
    audience. If you're managing "documents", then you'll find it useful
    to look at DocBook.

    If you're managing metadata about documents, then you might want to
    use either PRISM or Dublin Core, depending on who is going to be
    reading this. DC isn't a standard on its own, so it'll also need some
    other questions about how to represent and transport it to be
    answered.

    For rich-media "documents", you might find MPEG-7 worth a look.

    If you're dealing with academic refererences and citations, then
    things are extemely vague. There just isn't a good and widely agreed
    standard here. Chances are that XML isn't adequate anyway and you get
    pushed into RDF & ontologies. You might find looking at EndNote
    useful though.

    --
    Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
    Andy Dingley, Jan 23, 2004
    #5
  6. trek

    Peter Flynn Guest

    trek wrote:
    > Good evening,
    >
    > I am trying to locate a standard (commonly accepted) XML schema for
    > managing documents. What want to know is if someone has already
    > created an XML schema for describing the pertinent data about a
    > journal article (title, author(s), journal name, publication date,
    > etc).


    Dozens, going back years. But they are almost all DTDs, not Schemas.
    Ask any publisher, or read Chapter 2 of my book "Understanding SGML
    and XML Tools" (Kluwer, 1998) which explains several of the common
    ones in detail.

    As Arto posted, DocBook is one popular choice for articles about
    Computer Science topics. Many publishers still use the AAP DTDs,
    and the ISO 12083 Article DTD which descended from them. Other
    publishers have their own (notably Elsevier and Kluwer), and it's
    possible to use the TEI Lite DTD for articles in the Humanities.
    At the XML Conference last month I heard of a new set of DTDs just
    developed, but I don't know if the authors have released them yet.

    The nice thing about standards is there are so many to choose from.

    ///Peter
    Peter Flynn, Jan 24, 2004
    #6
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