Upgrade 2.6 to 3.0

Discussion in 'Python' started by joviyach, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. joviyach

    joviyach Guest

    I am fairly new to Python, the first version I loaded was 2.6. I have
    since downloaded 3.0 and I was wondering what the best practice for
    upgrading is? I am using Windows XP Pro for my OS.

    Thanks,

    Jim
     
    joviyach, Feb 4, 2009
    #1
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  2. joviyach

    joviyach Guest

    On Feb 4, 2:43 pm, Scott David Daniels <> wrote:
    > joviyach wrote:
    > > I am fairly new to Python, the first version I loaded was 2.6. I have
    > > since downloaded 3.0 and I was wondering what the best practice for
    > > upgrading is? I am using Windows XP Pro for my OS.

    >
    > On Windows, X.Y.* all go in one directory (over-riding each other)
    > So the whole 2.6.* family should work just fine alongside the 3.0.*
    > family.  In just a bit, 3.0.1 is coming soon, correcting some problems
    > in 3.0, so if you do install 3.0, check in a few weeks for an update.
    > The 2 -> 3 change was pretty substantial, so it will be a bit until the
    > 3.0 line gets lots of outside packages.
    >
    > --Scott David Daniels
    >


    Thanks Scott, I will be lurking/hopefully contributing.
     
    joviyach, Feb 4, 2009
    #2
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  3. joviyach

    Tim Rowe Guest

    2009/2/4 Scott David Daniels <>:
    > joviyach wrote:
    >>
    >> I am fairly new to Python, the first version I loaded was 2.6. I have
    >> since downloaded 3.0 and I was wondering what the best practice for
    >> upgrading is? I am using Windows XP Pro for my OS.

    >
    > On Windows, X.Y.* all go in one directory (over-riding each other)
    > So the whole 2.6.* family should work just fine alongside the 3.0.*


    Just don't try to have a 2.6 version of Idle and a 3.0 version of Idle
    running at the same time! 2.6 WinPy and 3.0 Idle seem to coexist ok,
    which is handy when I'm trying to get to grips with the differences
    between versions..

    --
    Tim Rowe
     
    Tim Rowe, Feb 5, 2009
    #3
  4. On 5 Feb, 01:18, Tim Rowe <> wrote:
    > 2009/2/4 Scott David Daniels <>:
    >
    > > joviyach wrote:

    >
    > >> I am fairly new to Python, the first version I loaded was 2.6. I have
    > >> since downloaded 3.0 and I was wondering what the best practice for
    > >> upgrading is? I am using Windows XP Pro for my OS.

    >
    > > On Windows, X.Y.* all go in one directory (over-riding each other)
    > > So the whole 2.6.* family should work just fine alongside the 3.0.*

    >
    > Just don't try to have a 2.6 version of Idle and a 3.0 version of Idle
    > running at the same time! 2.6 WinPy and 3.0 Idle seem to coexist ok,
    > which is handy when I'm trying to get to grips with the differences
    > between versions..
    >
    > --
    > Tim Rowe


    Just out of curiosity, am I the only one who think that switching to
    3.x right now is not a good idea?


    --- Giampaolo
    http://code.google.com/p/pyftpdlib
     
    Giampaolo Rodola', Feb 5, 2009
    #4
  5. joviyach

    Tim Rowe Guest

    2009/2/5 Giampaolo Rodola' <>:

    > Just out of curiosity, am I the only one who think that switching to
    > 3.x right now is not a good idea?


    I'm looking at making the switch, but I'm put off by the lack of 3rd
    party stuff such as PyWin (and I can't see a NumPy build for Python
    2.6 yet, never mind 3.0). Unless all you want is in the standard
    library, I think it's worth the general user holding back for a while
    whilst the tool providers catch up.


    --
    Tim Rowe
     
    Tim Rowe, Feb 5, 2009
    #5
  6. joviyach

    Steve Holden Guest

    Tim Rowe wrote:
    > 2009/2/5 Giampaolo Rodola' <>:
    >
    >> Just out of curiosity, am I the only one who think that switching to
    >> 3.x right now is not a good idea?

    >
    > I'm looking at making the switch, but I'm put off by the lack of 3rd
    > party stuff such as PyWin (and I can't see a NumPy build for Python
    > 2.6 yet, never mind 3.0). Unless all you want is in the standard
    > library, I think it's worth the general user holding back for a while
    > whilst the tool providers catch up.
    >
    >

    Take a look at the recent threads on the topic of the 3.0.1 release on
    the python-dev list. There is some feeling that the 3.0 release was
    unsatisfactory in certain ways. Some of the issues (including removal of
    some obscure features that should have been removed in 3.0) will be
    taken care of in 3.0.1.

    In addition to that expect a 3.1 release before too long (say, within
    the next six months) that will address some performance issues not
    addressed in 3.0.1 and provide other optimizations and perhaps a small
    list of new features. 3.0 is of remarkably good quality for a ".0"
    release. Expect even better things in the future.

    If you want to write portable code you can put into production now and
    move to 3.0 when appropriate then write for 2.6, and 2.7 when and if it
    comes out. Compile it with the -3 option and rewrite until it stops
    raising warnings. It will then be relatively easy to move to 3.x when
    the third-party library support you need is available.

    regards
    Steve
    --
    Steve Holden +1 571 484 6266 +1 800 494 3119
    Holden Web LLC http://www.holdenweb.com/
     
    Steve Holden, Feb 5, 2009
    #6
  7. joviyach

    Aahz Guest

    In article <>,
    Giampaolo Rodola' <> wrote:
    >
    >Just out of curiosity, am I the only one who think that switching to
    >3.x right now is not a good idea?


    Hardly. I certainly wouldn't consider it for production software, but
    installing it to play with probably is a Good Idea -- it's the future,
    after all.
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    Weinberg's Second Law: If builders built buildings the way programmers wrote
    programs, then the first woodpecker that came along would destroy civilization.
     
    Aahz, Feb 11, 2009
    #7
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