Useful libraries in ISO C

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Sensei, Sep 14, 2005.

  1. Sensei

    Sensei Guest

    Hi!

    I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C. Any kind of
    library, from lists, stacks, to trees, searching tools, sorting
    tools... really *any* kind.

    Do you have any idea? :)

    --
    Sensei <>

    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its
    limits. (A. Einstein)
     
    Sensei, Sep 14, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "Sensei" <> wrote in message
    news:dg8j5u$9b0$...
    > I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C.


    If you mean standard libraries, there're no such thing in the standard C
    library.
    If you mean the code itself being OK in terms of the ISO/ANSI C standard,
    then it's a different thing, there may be such libraries.

    > Any kind of
    > library, from lists, stacks, to trees, searching tools, sorting
    > tools... really *any* kind.
    >
    > Do you have any idea? :)


    Google or write them yourself. If you want to write them, then get books by
    Knuth or Sedgewick to get some ideas on how the various data structures can
    be made and for what purposes they should be used.

    Alex
     
    Alexei A. Frounze, Sep 14, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Sensei

    Sensei Guest

    On 2005-09-14 14:00:49 +0200, "Alexei A. Frounze" <> said:

    > "Sensei" <> wrote in message
    > news:dg8j5u$9b0$...
    >> I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C.

    >
    > If you mean standard libraries, there're no such thing in the standard
    > C library.
    > If you mean the code itself being OK in terms of the ISO/ANSI C
    > standard, then it's a different thing, there may be such libraries.



    I was thinking about something like boost for C...

    >
    > Google or write them yourself. If you want to write them, then get
    > books by Knuth or Sedgewick to get some ideas on how the various data
    > structures can be made and for what purposes they should be used.



    My question is about ISO C, many libraries exist, even GNU libs but
    it's not guaranteed that they are ISO C.

    --
    Sensei <>

    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its
    limits. (A. Einstein)
     
    Sensei, Sep 14, 2005
    #3
  4. "Sensei" <> wrote in message
    news:dg95pg$han$...
    ....
    > My question is about ISO C, many libraries exist, even GNU libs but
    > it's not guaranteed that they are ISO C.


    Then just check them and fix if/where appropriate.
    Alex
     
    Alexei A. Frounze, Sep 14, 2005
    #4
  5. Sensei

    Ben Pfaff Guest

    Sensei <> writes:

    > I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C. Any kind of
    > library, from lists, stacks, to trees, searching tools, sorting
    > tools... really *any* kind.


    I think that GNU libavl may be strict ISO C.
    I am not sure of it, however; there are likely to be lapses,
    especially in the test programs.
    --
    "The way I see it, an intelligent person who disagrees with me is
    probably the most important person I'll interact with on any given
    day."
    --Billy Chambless
     
    Ben Pfaff, Sep 14, 2005
    #5
  6. Sensei

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <dg95pg$han$>, Sensei <>
    writes
    >On 2005-09-14 14:00:49 +0200, "Alexei A. Frounze" <> said:
    >
    >> "Sensei" <> wrote in message
    >> news:dg8j5u$9b0$...
    >>> I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C.

    >>
    >> If you mean standard libraries, there're no such thing in the standard
    >> C library.
    >> If you mean the code itself being OK in terms of the ISO/ANSI C
    >> standard, then it's a different thing, there may be such libraries.

    >
    >
    >I was thinking about something like boost for C...
    >
    >>
    >> Google or write them yourself. If you want to write them, then get
    >> books by Knuth or Sedgewick to get some ideas on how the various data
    >> structures can be made and for what purposes they should be used.

    >
    >
    >My question is about ISO C, many libraries exist, even GNU libs but
    >it's not guaranteed that they are ISO C.
    >


    Why do you want ISO C libraries. Just because libraries are written to
    ISO C it does not mean they are any good or even work as specified.

    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris Hills, Sep 15, 2005
    #6
  7. Chris Hills wrote:
    > In article <dg95pg$han$>, Sensei <>
    > writes
    >
    >>On 2005-09-14 14:00:49 +0200, "Alexei A. Frounze" <> said:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"Sensei" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:dg8j5u$9b0$...
    >>>
    >>>>I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C.
    >>>
    >>>If you mean standard libraries, there're no such thing in the standard
    >>>C library.
    >>>If you mean the code itself being OK in terms of the ISO/ANSI C
    >>>standard, then it's a different thing, there may be such libraries.

    >>
    >>
    >>I was thinking about something like boost for C...
    >>
    >>
    >>>Google or write them yourself. If you want to write them, then get
    >>>books by Knuth or Sedgewick to get some ideas on how the various data
    >>>structures can be made and for what purposes they should be used.

    >>
    >>
    >>My question is about ISO C, many libraries exist, even GNU libs but
    >>it's not guaranteed that they are ISO C.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Why do you want ISO C libraries. Just because libraries are written to
    > ISO C it does not mean they are any good or even work as specified.
    >


    It is also irrelevant, as he did not ask for good/bad - just code
    conforming to ISO C.
    A search on www.freshmeat.net for "ANSI C" or "ISO C" - including the
    quotes - might be helpful
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?=22Nils_O=2E_Sel=E5sdal=22?=, Sep 15, 2005
    #7
  8. Sensei

    Sensei Guest

    On 2005-09-15 10:04:33 +0200, "Nils O. SelÄsdal" <> said:


    >
    > It is also irrelevant, as he did not ask for good/bad - just code
    > conforming to ISO C.
    > A search on www.freshmeat.net for "ANSI C" or "ISO C" - including the
    > quotes - might be helpful



    Reinventing the wheel is not a good idea. There are out there libraries
    that you find useful, ISO C compliant.

    Any kind would be nice: lists, trees, sorting, garbage collectors...
    whatever. It's not a problem if my code is ISO C, but my question
    relates directly with the standard.

    If you feel this is not the right place, you can point me a better newsgroup.

    --
    Sensei <>

    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its
    limits. (A. Einstein)
     
    Sensei, Sep 15, 2005
    #8
  9. Sensei

    Malcolm Guest

    "Sensei" <> wrote
    > I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C. Any kind of
    > library, from lists, stacks, to trees, searching tools, sorting tools...
    > really *any* kind.
    >

    I've got quite a collection, of everything from hash tables to red black
    trees, JPEG codecs, 3d graphics algorithms, statistical functions.
    Can you be a bit more specific about what you want to do?
     
    Malcolm, Sep 16, 2005
    #9
  10. Sensei

    Sensei Guest

    On 2005-09-16 19:36:08 +0200, "Malcolm" <> said:

    >
    > "Sensei" <> wrote
    >> I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C. Any kind of
    >> library, from lists, stacks, to trees, searching tools, sorting
    >> tools... really *any* kind.
    >>

    > I've got quite a collection, of everything from hash tables to red
    > black trees, JPEG codecs, 3d graphics algorithms, statistical functions.
    > Can you be a bit more specific about what you want to do?
    >


    A survey for students. I'd like them to focus on their tasks and not on
    something complementary like lists or trees, or hashes, or anything.


    --
    Sensei <>

    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its
    limits. (A. Einstein)
     
    Sensei, Sep 17, 2005
    #10
  11. Sensei

    Malcolm Guest

    "Sensei" <> wrote
    >
    > A survey for students. I'd like them to focus on their tasks and not on
    > something complementary like lists or trees, or hashes, or anything.
    >

    The problem with C is that the simpler data structures (linked lists,
    queues, basic trees, stacks etc) are easier to code from scratch than to use
    from a library.

    I've got a hash table and red-black tree I can send you, however.
     
    Malcolm, Sep 18, 2005
    #11
  12. Sensei

    Sensei Guest

    On 2005-09-18 11:25:45 +0200, "Malcolm" <> said:

    >
    > "Sensei" <> wrote
    >>
    >> A survey for students. I'd like them to focus on their tasks and not on
    >> something complementary like lists or trees, or hashes, or anything.
    >>

    > The problem with C is that the simpler data structures (linked lists,
    > queues, basic trees, stacks etc) are easier to code from scratch than
    > to use from a library.
    >
    > I've got a hash table and red-black tree I can send you, however.
    >


    Thank you anyway. I really like the spirit of STL, that's useful for
    small projects when you have to use something without wasting time on
    things you do already know.

    Think about numerical recipes. Students can concentrate on other
    aspects rather than reimplement another gaussian elimination...

    Some kind of wiki... probably would help... I will think about it.

    --
    Sensei <>

    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its
    limits. (A. Einstein)
     
    Sensei, Sep 18, 2005
    #12
  13. Sensei

    Joe Wright Guest

    Sensei wrote:
    > On 2005-09-14 14:00:49 +0200, "Alexei A. Frounze" <> said:
    >
    >> "Sensei" <> wrote in message
    >> news:dg8j5u$9b0$...
    >>
    >>> I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C.

    >>
    >>
    >> If you mean standard libraries, there're no such thing in the standard
    >> C library.
    >> If you mean the code itself being OK in terms of the ISO/ANSI C
    >> standard, then it's a different thing, there may be such libraries.

    >
    >
    >
    > I was thinking about something like boost for C...
    >
    >>
    >> Google or write them yourself. If you want to write them, then get
    >> books by Knuth or Sedgewick to get some ideas on how the various data
    >> structures can be made and for what purposes they should be used.

    >
    >
    >
    > My question is about ISO C, many libraries exist, even GNU libs but it's
    > not guaranteed that they are ISO C.
    >

    That's the beauty of GNU, you don't need the guarantee.

    --
    Joe Wright
    "Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."
    --- Albert Einstein ---
     
    Joe Wright, Sep 20, 2005
    #13
  14. Sensei

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Joe Wright
    <> writes
    >Sensei wrote:
    >> On 2005-09-14 14:00:49 +0200, "Alexei A. Frounze" <> said:
    >>
    >>> "Sensei" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:dg8j5u$9b0$...
    >>>
    >>>> I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> If you mean standard libraries, there're no such thing in the standard
    >>> C library.
    >>> If you mean the code itself being OK in terms of the ISO/ANSI C
    >>> standard, then it's a different thing, there may be such libraries.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I was thinking about something like boost for C...
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Google or write them yourself. If you want to write them, then get
    >>> books by Knuth or Sedgewick to get some ideas on how the various data
    >>> structures can be made and for what purposes they should be used.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> My question is about ISO C, many libraries exist, even GNU libs but it's
    >> not guaranteed that they are ISO C.
    >>

    >That's the beauty of GNU, you don't need the guarantee.

    why not ?

    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris Hills, Sep 20, 2005
    #14
  15. Sensei

    Sensei Guest

    On 2005-09-20 08:46:50 +0200, Chris Hills <> said:

    >> That's the beauty of GNU, you don't need the guarantee.

    > why not ?



    Provided as-it-is, no guarantee of any kind.

    --
    Sensei <>

    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its
    limits. (A. Einstein)
     
    Sensei, Sep 20, 2005
    #15
  16. Sensei

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <dgohfc$3o6$>, Sensei <>
    writes
    >On 2005-09-20 08:46:50 +0200, Chris Hills <> said:
    >
    >>> That's the beauty of GNU, you don't need the guarantee.

    >> why not ?

    >
    >
    >Provided as-it-is, no guarantee of any kind.
    >

    How is that helpful?


    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris Hills, Sep 20, 2005
    #16
  17. Sensei

    Rob Thorpe Guest

    Sensei wrote:
    > On 2005-09-18 11:25:45 +0200, "Malcolm" <> said:
    >
    > >
    > > "Sensei" <> wrote
    > >>
    > >> A survey for students. I'd like them to focus on their tasks and not on
    > >> something complementary like lists or trees, or hashes, or anything.
    > >>

    > > The problem with C is that the simpler data structures (linked lists,
    > > queues, basic trees, stacks etc) are easier to code from scratch than
    > > to use from a library.
    > >
    > > I've got a hash table and red-black tree I can send you, however.
    > >

    >
    > Thank you anyway. I really like the spirit of STL, that's useful for
    > small projects when you have to use something without wasting time on
    > things you do already know.
    >
    > Think about numerical recipes. Students can concentrate on other
    > aspects rather than reimplement another gaussian elimination...
    >
    > Some kind of wiki... probably would help... I will think about it.


    Check out GTK+ glib - I think this is ANSI C, not completely sure. Not
    sure how good it is either.

    Also look at CBFalconer's hash library, and Paul Hsieh's hash library
    (not sure if that one is completely ANSI C).
     
    Rob Thorpe, Sep 20, 2005
    #17
  18. Sensei

    Joe Wright Guest

    Chris Hills wrote:
    > In article <>, Joe Wright
    > <> writes
    >
    >>Sensei wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 2005-09-14 14:00:49 +0200, "Alexei A. Frounze" <> said:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>"Sensei" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:dg8j5u$9b0$...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>If you mean standard libraries, there're no such thing in the standard
    >>>>C library.
    >>>>If you mean the code itself being OK in terms of the ISO/ANSI C
    >>>>standard, then it's a different thing, there may be such libraries.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I was thinking about something like boost for C...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Google or write them yourself. If you want to write them, then get
    >>>>books by Knuth or Sedgewick to get some ideas on how the various data
    >>>>structures can be made and for what purposes they should be used.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>My question is about ISO C, many libraries exist, even GNU libs but it's
    >>>not guaranteed that they are ISO C.
    >>>

    >>
    >>That's the beauty of GNU, you don't need the guarantee.

    >
    > why not ?
    >

    Because you have the sources. If the GNU code is not sufficiently ISO
    for you, you can modify it to taste. That's the whole point.

    A guarantee promises your money back or something if not satisfied.
    You'd have to pay RMS and the FSF for emacs or something. Can't do it.
    They can point you to it but they won't sell it to you. It's free.
    Guarantees do not apply.
    --
    Joe Wright
    "Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."
    --- Albert Einstein ---
     
    Joe Wright, Sep 21, 2005
    #18
  19. Sensei

    Chris Hills Guest

    In article <>, Joe Wright
    <> writes
    >Chris Hills wrote:
    >> In article <>, Joe Wright
    >> <> writes
    >>
    >>>Sensei wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On 2005-09-14 14:00:49 +0200, "Alexei A. Frounze" <> said:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>"Sensei" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:dg8j5u$9b0$...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I'm looking for useful libraries that are strictly ISO C.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>If you mean standard libraries, there're no such thing in the standard
    >>>>>C library.
    >>>>>If you mean the code itself being OK in terms of the ISO/ANSI C
    >>>>>standard, then it's a different thing, there may be such libraries.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I was thinking about something like boost for C...
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Google or write them yourself. If you want to write them, then get
    >>>>>books by Knuth or Sedgewick to get some ideas on how the various data
    >>>>>structures can be made and for what purposes they should be used.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>My question is about ISO C, many libraries exist, even GNU libs but it's
    >>>>not guaranteed that they are ISO C.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>That's the beauty of GNU, you don't need the guarantee.

    >>
    >> why not ?
    >>

    >Because you have the sources. If the GNU code is not sufficiently ISO
    >for you, you can modify it to taste. That's the whole point.


    and you are completely liable for all of it....

    I have done support for a compiler and 19 times out of 20 when a
    "compiler bug" was found it turned out the compiler was correct and the
    person who found the bug was wrong. SO 19 out of 20 "fixes" will in fact
    make things worse.

    >A guarantee promises your money back or something if not satisfied.


    IANAL
    It also has fitness for purpose. It means that the tool producer is
    taking some of the liability. When you use open source YOU are taking
    the responsibility (and the liability). I f you ship something that has
    a bug that causes an accident they will send the lawyer to you....

    If you "saved money" by using open source YOU will have to prove how
    you tested it was fit for purpose etc.

    With a commercial tool you buy where you can't edit the source you have
    reasonable grounds to expect it will work as advertised.

    Like it or not you are in the software business and it is a business
    like any other. Liability and responsibility for things still applies

    IF a surgeon used "open source" and home made equipment in the OR and
    it went wrong you would scream blue murder. If he used commercial
    equipment from a medical equipment company and it went wrong you would
    go after that company.

    Commercial tools are (usually) well tested and checked. Often certified
    etc. SO unless you are going to test and certify the actual Open source
    system you are using you are asking for trouble.

    --
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills Staffs England /\/\/\/\/
    /\/\/ www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
    \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    Chris Hills, Sep 21, 2005
    #19
  20. Sensei wrote:
    > On 2005-09-18 11:25:45 +0200, "Malcolm" <> said:
    >
    > >
    > > "Sensei" <> wrote
    > >>
    > >> A survey for students. I'd like them to focus on their tasks and not on
    > >> something complementary like lists or trees, or hashes, or anything.
    > >>

    > > The problem with C is that the simpler data structures (linked lists,
    > > queues, basic trees, stacks etc) are easier to code from scratch than
    > > to use from a library.
    > >
    > > I've got a hash table and red-black tree I can send you, however.
    > >

    >
    > Thank you anyway. I really like the spirit of STL, that's useful for
    > small projects when you have to use something without wasting time on
    > things you do already know.
    >


    Check our generic sglib at http://sourceforge.net/projects/sglib
    freely inspired by STL. It is still very simple, yet providing lists,
    double linked lists, sorted lists, implements generic sorting
    algorithms on arrays, red-black trees, etc. You may like it.

    Marian
     
    Marian Vittek, Sep 21, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Franck DARRAS
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    663
    Jim Higson
    Aug 23, 2004
  2. Alexei Polkhanov
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    2,491
  3. Replies:
    13
    Views:
    6,513
    Dave Thompson
    Dec 20, 2004
  4. ISO C89 and ISO C99

    , Dec 10, 2004, in forum: C Programming
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    562
    Dave Thompson
    Dec 20, 2004
  5. James Mills

    GSM to ISO / UCS2 to ISO

    James Mills, Aug 16, 2010, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    496
    James Mills
    Aug 16, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page