User Scalable Text Using CSS?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Cerebral Believer, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. Hi all,

    I am keen to allow people who view my site to be able to resize the text in
    their browsers (especially for people who need to read larger text). With
    my old web-page I specified the point size in the HTML code, and noticed
    that when using Internet Explorer the text could not be resized. In
    designing my new site I have chosen to express the text sizes as percentages
    in a stylesheet, e.g.

    ..side_panel_title {
    font : bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    'Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    color : #990000;
    }
    ..side_panel_text {
    font : 50% 'Trebuchet MS', 'Lucida
    Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    color : #373737;
    }

    I did this thinking that the viewers of my web-pages would be able to select
    larger font sizes for viewing by adjusting their browser text settings.
    However, when the page is rendered in Internet Explorer, the text only
    appears in a readable size (the size I actually designed the page) when the
    "View | Text Size | Largest" setting is selected. I had thought that users
    would be able to increase the size text to a larger size than the sizes I
    used to design the page in order to make the text easier to read - that is
    what I want to achieve, that is the same effect as on the w3org site
    http://www.w3.org/. What am I doing wrong? Or is what I am trying to
    achieve not possible (this way)?

    Regards,
    C.B.
    Cerebral Believer, Mar 25, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Cerebral Believer wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I am keen to allow people who view my site to be able to resize the text in
    > their browsers (especially for people who need to read larger text). With
    > my old web-page I specified the point size in the HTML code, and noticed
    > that when using Internet Explorer the text could not be resized. In
    > designing my new site I have chosen to express the text sizes as percentages
    > in a stylesheet, e.g.
    >
    > .side_panel_title {
    > font : bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    > 'Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    > color : #990000;
    > }
    > .side_panel_text {
    > font : 50% 'Trebuchet MS', 'Lucida
    > Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    > color : #373737;
    > }
    >
    > I did this thinking that the viewers of my web-pages would be able to select
    > larger font sizes for viewing by adjusting their browser text settings.
    > However, when the page is rendered in Internet Explorer, the text only
    > appears in a readable size (the size I actually designed the page) when the
    > "View | Text Size | Largest" setting is selected. I had thought that users
    > would be able to increase the size text to a larger size than the sizes I
    > used to design the page in order to make the text easier to read - that is
    > what I want to achieve, that is the same effect as on the w3org site
    > http://www.w3.org/. What am I doing wrong?


    font: bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS','Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    ^^^^
    THAT! 50% in incredibly small!

    BODY { font-size: 100%; }
    ..anything_else not smaller than 75%, 80% is usually the preferred
    smallest for stuff like boilerplate.

    Or is what I am trying to
    > achieve not possible (this way)?



    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
    Jonathan N. Little, Mar 25, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote in message
    news:44255fbb$0$3700$...
    > Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> I am keen to allow people who view my site to be able to resize the text
    >> in their browsers (especially for people who need to read larger text).
    >> With my old web-page I specified the point size in the HTML code, and
    >> noticed that when using Internet Explorer the text could not be resized.
    >> In designing my new site I have chosen to express the text sizes as
    >> percentages in a stylesheet, e.g.
    >>
    >> .side_panel_title {
    >> font : bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    >> 'Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >> color : #990000;
    >> }
    >> .side_panel_text {
    >> font : 50% 'Trebuchet MS', 'Lucida
    >> Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >> color : #373737;
    >> }
    >>
    >> I did this thinking that the viewers of my web-pages would be able to
    >> select larger font sizes for viewing by adjusting their browser text
    >> settings. However, when the page is rendered in Internet Explorer, the
    >> text only appears in a readable size (the size I actually designed the
    >> page) when the "View | Text Size | Largest" setting is selected. I had
    >> thought that users would be able to increase the size text to a larger
    >> size than the sizes I used to design the page in order to make the text
    >> easier to read - that is what I want to achieve, that is the same effect
    >> as on the w3org site http://www.w3.org/. What am I doing wrong?

    >
    > font: bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS','Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    > ^^^^
    > THAT! 50% in incredibly small!
    >
    > BODY { font-size: 100%; }
    > .anything_else not smaller than 75%, 80% is usually the preferred smallest
    > for stuff like boilerplate.


    Yes, thanks for that you are right, that text size is small. I had used
    that size because, given the way I had formed my CSS & HTML, it rendered the
    way I prefer to see it in my browser, but since I modified my CSS the way
    you suggested I can see why I should use a larger size. The only issue I
    have now is that the text does appear to be bold when in larger sizes, and I
    would have liked to keep the text in the same weight as I would usually see
    it on my screen, I will experiemnt with the font-weight.

    Thanks very much for your help.
    C.B.
    Cerebral Believer, Mar 25, 2006
    #3
  4. Cerebral Believer wrote:

    >> Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >>> .side_panel_title {
    >>> font: bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS', ... <snip>

    >
    > The only issue I have now is that the text does appear to be bold when
    > in larger sizes, and I would have liked to keep the text in the same
    > weight as I would usually see it on my screen, I will experiemnt with
    > the font-weight.


    Remove 'bold' from your css and it won't be .. er .. 'bold' anymore.

    --
    -bts
    -Warning: I brake for lawn deer
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Mar 25, 2006
    #4
  5. Cerebral Believer wrote:

    >
    > "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote in message
    > news:44255fbb$0$3700$...
    >> Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >>> Hi all,
    >>>
    >>> I am keen to allow people who view my site to be able to resize the text
    >>> in their browsers (especially for people who need to read larger text).
    >>> With my old web-page I specified the point size in the HTML code, and
    >>> noticed that when using Internet Explorer the text could not be resized.
    >>> In designing my new site I have chosen to express the text sizes as
    >>> percentages in a stylesheet, e.g.
    >>>
    >>> .side_panel_title {
    >>> font : bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    >>> 'Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >>> color : #990000;
    >>> }
    >>> .side_panel_text {
    >>> font : 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    >>> 'Lucida
    >>> Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >>> color : #373737;
    >>> }
    >>>
    >>> I did this thinking that the viewers of my web-pages would be able to
    >>> select larger font sizes for viewing by adjusting their browser text
    >>> settings. However, when the page is rendered in Internet Explorer, the
    >>> text only appears in a readable size (the size I actually designed the
    >>> page) when the "View | Text Size | Largest" setting is selected. I had
    >>> thought that users would be able to increase the size text to a larger
    >>> size than the sizes I used to design the page in order to make the text
    >>> easier to read - that is what I want to achieve, that is the same effect
    >>> as on the w3org site http://www.w3.org/. What am I doing wrong?

    >>
    >> font: bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS','Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >> ^^^^
    >> THAT! 50% in incredibly small!
    >>
    >> BODY { font-size: 100%; }
    >> .anything_else not smaller than 75%, 80% is usually the preferred
    >> smallest for stuff like boilerplate.

    >
    > Yes, thanks for that you are right, that text size is small. I had used
    > that size because, given the way I had formed my CSS & HTML, it rendered
    > the way I prefer to see it in my browser, but since I modified my CSS the
    > way
    > you suggested I can see why I should use a larger size. The only issue I
    > have now is that the text does appear to be bold when in larger sizes, and
    > I would have liked to keep the text in the same weight as I would usually
    > see it on my screen, I will experiemnt with the font-weight.
    >
    > Thanks very much for your help.
    > C.B.


    Why not leave the font setting at 100% and adjust your browser so it looks
    good to you on your system. Then it will also look good to everyone else
    when they see it on theirs at their ideal font size. This is assuming of
    course that they have their default font size set to their ideal.

    Carolyn

    --
    Carolyn Marenger
    Carolyn Marenger, Mar 25, 2006
    #5
  6. Cerebral Believer wrote:
    > "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote in message
    > news:44255fbb$0$3700$...
    >> Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >>> Hi all,
    >>>
    >>> I am keen to allow people who view my site to be able to resize the text
    >>> in their browsers (especially for people who need to read larger text).
    >>> With my old web-page I specified the point size in the HTML code, and
    >>> noticed that when using Internet Explorer the text could not be resized.
    >>> In designing my new site I have chosen to express the text sizes as
    >>> percentages in a stylesheet, e.g.
    >>>
    >>> .side_panel_title {
    >>> font : bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    >>> 'Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >>> color : #990000;
    >>> }
    >>> .side_panel_text {
    >>> font : 50% 'Trebuchet MS', 'Lucida
    >>> Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >>> color : #373737;
    >>> }
    >>>
    >>> I did this thinking that the viewers of my web-pages would be able to
    >>> select larger font sizes for viewing by adjusting their browser text
    >>> settings. However, when the page is rendered in Internet Explorer, the
    >>> text only appears in a readable size (the size I actually designed the
    >>> page) when the "View | Text Size | Largest" setting is selected. I had
    >>> thought that users would be able to increase the size text to a larger
    >>> size than the sizes I used to design the page in order to make the text
    >>> easier to read - that is what I want to achieve, that is the same effect
    >>> as on the w3org site http://www.w3.org/. What am I doing wrong?

    >> font: bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS','Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >> ^^^^
    >> THAT! 50% in incredibly small!
    >>
    >> BODY { font-size: 100%; }
    >> .anything_else not smaller than 75%, 80% is usually the preferred smallest
    >> for stuff like boilerplate.

    >
    > Yes, thanks for that you are right, that text size is small. I had used
    > that size because, given the way I had formed my CSS & HTML, it rendered the
    > way I prefer to see it in my browser, but since I modified my CSS the way
    > you suggested I can see why I should use a larger size. The only issue I
    > have now is that the text does appear to be bold when in larger sizes, and I
    > would have liked to keep the text in the same weight as I would usually see
    > it on my screen, I will experiemnt with the font-weight.
    >


    Actually Toby had a very good argument and demo on default font size:

    http://tobyinkster.co.uk/web-fonts
    Fonts — Toby Inkster
    --
    Take care,

    Jonathan
    -------------------
    LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
    http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
    Jonathan N. Little, Mar 25, 2006
    #6
  7. "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in message
    news:rLdVf.27491$...
    > Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >
    >>> Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >>>> .side_panel_title {
    >>>> font: bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS', ... <snip>

    >>
    >> The only issue I have now is that the text does appear to be bold when
    >> in larger sizes, and I would have liked to keep the text in the same
    >> weight as I would usually see it on my screen, I will experiemnt with
    >> the font-weight.

    >
    > Remove 'bold' from your css and it won't be .. er .. 'bold' anymore.


    Yes, of course that makes sense, it was another poster who suggested the use
    of "bold", which I thought sounded a little odd. After checking w3c I can
    see I can use "normal" instead. Thanks for your response.

    Regards,
    C.B.
    Cerebral Believer, Mar 25, 2006
    #7
  8. Cerebral Believer wrote:

    > "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote
    >> Remove 'bold' from your css and it won't be .. er .. 'bold' anymore.

    >
    > Yes, of course that makes sense, it was another poster who suggested
    > the use of "bold", which I thought sounded a little odd. After
    > checking w3c I can see I can use "normal" instead. Thanks for your
    > response.


    "normal" is the default, so you do not have to mention it at all.

    --
    -bts
    -Warning: I brake for lawn deer
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Mar 25, 2006
    #8
  9. "Carolyn Marenger" <> wrote in message
    news:265d6$442569f4$cf701c97$...
    > Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote in message
    >> news:44255fbb$0$3700$...
    >>> Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >>>> Hi all,
    >>>>
    >>>> I am keen to allow people who view my site to be able to resize the
    >>>> text
    >>>> in their browsers (especially for people who need to read larger text).
    >>>> With my old web-page I specified the point size in the HTML code, and
    >>>> noticed that when using Internet Explorer the text could not be
    >>>> resized.
    >>>> In designing my new site I have chosen to express the text sizes as
    >>>> percentages in a stylesheet, e.g.
    >>>>
    >>>> .side_panel_title {
    >>>> font : bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    >>>> 'Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >>>> color : #990000;
    >>>> }
    >>>> .side_panel_text {
    >>>> font : 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    >>>> 'Lucida
    >>>> Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >>>> color : #373737;
    >>>> }
    >>>>
    >>>> I did this thinking that the viewers of my web-pages would be able to
    >>>> select larger font sizes for viewing by adjusting their browser text
    >>>> settings. However, when the page is rendered in Internet Explorer, the
    >>>> text only appears in a readable size (the size I actually designed the
    >>>> page) when the "View | Text Size | Largest" setting is selected. I had
    >>>> thought that users would be able to increase the size text to a larger
    >>>> size than the sizes I used to design the page in order to make the text
    >>>> easier to read - that is what I want to achieve, that is the same
    >>>> effect
    >>>> as on the w3org site http://www.w3.org/. What am I doing wrong?
    >>>
    >>> font: bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS','Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >>> ^^^^
    >>> THAT! 50% in incredibly small!
    >>>
    >>> BODY { font-size: 100%; }
    >>> .anything_else not smaller than 75%, 80% is usually the preferred
    >>> smallest for stuff like boilerplate.

    >>
    >> Yes, thanks for that you are right, that text size is small. I had used
    >> that size because, given the way I had formed my CSS & HTML, it rendered
    >> the way I prefer to see it in my browser, but since I modified my CSS the
    >> way
    >> you suggested I can see why I should use a larger size. The only issue I
    >> have now is that the text does appear to be bold when in larger sizes,
    >> and
    >> I would have liked to keep the text in the same weight as I would usually
    >> see it on my screen, I will experiemnt with the font-weight.
    >>
    >> Thanks very much for your help.
    >> C.B.

    >
    > Why not leave the font setting at 100% and adjust your browser so it looks
    > good to you on your system. Then it will also look good to everyone else
    > when they see it on theirs at their ideal font size. This is assuming of
    > course that they have their default font size set to their ideal.


    Carolyn,

    Yes, I think you have seen through my faulty logic. I actually think the
    page looks best in a small font size and want everyone else to see it that
    way by default. I had thought IE scaled the text sizes up/down relative to
    the text sizes in which the page was designed - I now understand this is not
    correct. I am new to this and I guess it shows, but that is all part of
    learning, right? Thanks for your advice.

    Regards,
    C.B.
    Cerebral Believer, Mar 25, 2006
    #9
  10. Cerebral Believer wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I am keen to allow people who view my site to be able to resize the text in
    > their browsers (especially for people who need to read larger text). With
    > my old web-page I specified the point size in the HTML code, and noticed
    > that when using Internet Explorer the text could not be resized. In
    > designing my new site I have chosen to express the text sizes as percentages
    > in a stylesheet, e.g.
    >
    > .side_panel_title {
    > font : bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    > 'Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    > color : #990000;
    > }
    > .side_panel_text {
    > font : 50% 'Trebuchet MS', 'Lucida
    > Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    > color : #373737;
    > }
    >
    > I did this thinking that the viewers of my web-pages would be able to select
    > larger font sizes for viewing by adjusting their browser text settings.
    > However, when the page is rendered in Internet Explorer, the text only
    > appears in a readable size (the size I actually designed the page) when the
    > "View | Text Size | Largest" setting is selected. I had thought that users
    > would be able to increase the size text to a larger size than the sizes I
    > used to design the page in order to make the text easier to read - that is
    > what I want to achieve, that is the same effect as on the w3org site
    > http://www.w3.org/. What am I doing wrong? Or is what I am trying to
    > achieve not possible (this way)?


    I don't understand--how, other than a browser, are you examining your
    work while designing it, that it could look different than it does in a
    browser?

    What is the base text size, that the side panel is supposed to be 50% of?
    Harlan Messinger, Mar 25, 2006
    #10
  11. "Harlan Messinger" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >> Hi all,
    >>
    >> I am keen to allow people who view my site to be able to resize the text
    >> in their browsers (especially for people who need to read larger text).
    >> With my old web-page I specified the point size in the HTML code, and
    >> noticed that when using Internet Explorer the text could not be resized.
    >> In designing my new site I have chosen to express the text sizes as
    >> percentages in a stylesheet, e.g.
    >>
    >> .side_panel_title {
    >> font : bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS',
    >> 'Lucida Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >> color : #990000;
    >> }
    >> .side_panel_text {
    >> font : 50% 'Trebuchet MS', 'Lucida
    >> Grande', Arial, sans-serif;
    >> color : #373737;
    >> }
    >>
    >> I did this thinking that the viewers of my web-pages would be able to
    >> select larger font sizes for viewing by adjusting their browser text
    >> settings. However, when the page is rendered in Internet Explorer, the
    >> text only appears in a readable size (the size I actually designed the
    >> page) when the "View | Text Size | Largest" setting is selected. I had
    >> thought that users would be able to increase the size text to a larger
    >> size than the sizes I used to design the page in order to make the text
    >> easier to read - that is what I want to achieve, that is the same effect
    >> as on the w3org site http://www.w3.org/. What am I doing wrong? Or is
    >> what I am trying to achieve not possible (this way)?

    >
    > I don't understand--how, other than a browser, are you examining your work
    > while designing it, that it could look different than it does in a
    > browser?
    >
    > What is the base text size, that the side panel is supposed to be 50% of?


    Harlan,

    If you read my response to Carolyn, you will see the basic error I was
    making. Very silly of me I admit, but the matter is now resolved. Thanks
    for your resonse.

    Regards,
    C.B.
    Cerebral Believer, Mar 25, 2006
    #11
  12. Cerebral Believer wrote:

    <snip>

    > Carolyn,
    >
    > Yes, I think you have seen through my faulty logic. I actually think the
    > page looks best in a small font size and want everyone else to see it that
    > way by default. I had thought IE scaled the text sizes up/down relative
    > to the text sizes in which the page was designed - I now understand this
    > is not
    > correct. I am new to this and I guess it shows, but that is all part of
    > learning, right? Thanks for your advice.
    >
    > Regards,
    > C.B.


    Glad I could help,

    Carolyn
    --
    Carolyn Marenger
    Carolyn Marenger, Mar 25, 2006
    #12
  13. Cerebral Believer

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <rLdVf.27491$>,
    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote:

    > Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >
    > >> Cerebral Believer wrote:
    > >>> .side_panel_title {
    > >>> font: bold 50% 'Trebuchet MS', ... <snip>

    > >
    > > The only issue I have now is that the text does appear to be bold when
    > > in larger sizes, and I would have liked to keep the text in the same
    > > weight as I would usually see it on my screen, I will experiemnt with
    > > the font-weight.

    >
    > Remove 'bold' from your css and it won't be .. er .. 'bold' anymore.


    You mean, of course, it won't be .. er .. bold anymore

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Mar 26, 2006
    #13
  14. Cerebral Believer

    Guest

    Carolyn Marenger wrote:
    > Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote in message
    > > news:44255fbb$0$3700$...
    > >> Cerebral Believer wrote:

    > Why not leave the font setting at 100% and adjust your browser so it looks
    > good to you on your system. Then it will also look good to everyone else
    > when they see it on theirs at their ideal font size. This is assuming of
    > course that they have their default font size set to their ideal.


    This assumption is not as simple as it looks. It is an assumption made
    by Toby too in his nice page on this business (sorry, once again, lost
    post on my online reader and am trying Google).

    The assumption is that a site that is made with no specified or 100%
    main text is the basis for the average user to set the preferred
    browser size. But I really do wonder how true this assumption is. I get
    out now and then and am always surprised to see how big my main text
    looks on other people's computers. I think what happens a lot more than
    is realised is this: default browser settings and/or user twiddling
    settle them to read average web pages. Average web pages made by
    average designers, most of whom, are not followers of the generally
    intelligent policies repeatedly advertised on alt.html, seem very often
    if not mostly to use less than normal sizes. In other words, users have
    browsers set to compensate for small sized texts!

    I am not advocating against your advice. I am a great supporter of it.
    It is just that I think, privately, we should distinguish between
    advocacy and analysis. The more designers follow the good advice, the
    more the ideal is reached but there is a pressure to use smaller than
    normal just because others do and it has influenced browser settings. I
    speak from what i see around me and from pressure from one or two of my
    clients (usually resisted by me, but not 100% successfully)

    --
    dorayme
    , Mar 26, 2006
    #14
  15. Cerebral Believer

    Guest

    Carolyn Marenger wrote:
    > Cerebral Believer wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "Jonathan N. Little" <> wrote in message
    > > news:44255fbb$0$3700$...
    > >> Cerebral Believer wrote:

    > Why not leave the font setting at 100% and adjust your browser so it looks
    > good to you on your system. Then it will also look good to everyone else
    > when they see it on theirs at their ideal font size. This is assuming of
    > course that they have their default font size set to their ideal.


    This assumption is not as simple as it looks. It is an assumption made
    by Toby too in his nice page on this business (sorry, once again, lost
    post on my online reader and am trying Google).

    The assumption is that a site that is made with no specified or 100%
    main text is the basis for the average user to set the preferred
    browser size. But I really do wonder how true this assumption is. I get
    out now and then and am always surprised to see how big my main text
    looks on other people's computers. I think what happens a lot more than
    is realised is this: default browser settings and/or user twiddling
    settle them to read average web pages. Average web pages made by
    average designers, most of whom, are not followers of the generally
    intelligent policies repeatedly advertised on alt.html, seem very often
    if not mostly to use less than normal sizes. In other words, users have
    browsers set to compensate for small sized texts!

    I am not advocating against your advice. I am a great supporter of it.
    It is just that I think, privately, we should distinguish between
    advocacy and analysis. The more designers follow the good advice, the
    more the ideal is reached but there is a pressure to use smaller than
    normal just because others do and it has influenced browser settings. I
    speak from what i see around me and from pressure from one or two of my
    clients (usually resisted by me, but not 100% successfully)

    --
    dorayme
    , Mar 26, 2006
    #15
  16. Cerebral Believer

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <>,
    wrote:

    > This assumption is not as simple as it looks.


    Sorry, it seems that my Google clicking was too much and my post
    went twice...

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Mar 26, 2006
    #16
  17. In article <>,
    wrote:

    > The assumption is that a site that is made with no specified or 100%
    > main text is the basis for the average user to set the preferred
    > browser size. But I really do wonder how true this assumption is.


    Good point. But if someone knows enough to set the browser text size in
    the first place, they know how to reduce or increase it. Otherwise, what
    should an HTML jockey do? Should we design sites based on 80%? What does
    100% mean to them?
    We do, of course, what they want. But we point out the problem one way
    or another. A bunch of them would be perfectly happy if we ran them off
    and reduced the text size in their own browsers while they were gone to
    match their ideal. I'm serious.

    leo

    --
    <http://web0.greatbasin.net/~leo/>
    Leonard Blaisdell, Mar 26, 2006
    #17
  18. Cerebral Believer

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <-sjc.supernews.net>,
    Leonard Blaisdell <> wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > wrote:
    >
    > > The assumption is that a site that is made with no specified or 100%
    > > main text is the basis for the average user to set the preferred
    > > browser size. But I really do wonder how true this assumption is.

    >
    > Good point. But if someone knows enough to set the browser text size in
    > the first place, they know how to reduce or increase it. Otherwise, what
    > should an HTML jockey do? Should we design sites based on 80%? What does
    > 100% mean to them?
    > We do, of course, what they want. But we point out the problem one way
    > or another. A bunch of them would be perfectly happy if we ran them off
    > and reduced the text size in their own browsers while they were gone to
    > match their ideal. I'm serious.
    >
    > leo


    Let me be serious too, Leo. I did exactly this on a friend's
    computer in Feb of this year! That is, I downed the browser text
    so 100% set text would look reasonable. At one stage, only in the
    browser window., At another time, in preferences. Not for them,
    but for me, meant temporarily - I was using their machine a lot.
    I forgot to reset on both occasions. And yes, it did look
    reasonable to them on sites with 100% set (or defaulted so). But
    the whole family screamed blue murder when they went to their
    usual sites.

    Another family member (not living there) had set it up for them
    so that they felt comfortable with some sites (doubtless, ones
    made with less 100% main text) that were either used for testing
    or ones that were important to them at the time. So the issue I
    was describing is actually a bit more complicated than is often
    made out. I will say it again, we need to distinguish between
    good ideal policy and the real world. And we need to understand
    that there is an element of changing the real world in practicing
    good policy.

    I have no idea whether those who so confidently advise others to
    use 100% main text are aware of this issue or the pressures
    concerned. I can't help feeling that the absolutely confident
    tone of the advice (to put it nicely) might not be modified now
    and again to make the receiver of the advice a little more aware
    of the underlying issues.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Mar 26, 2006
    #18
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