Using Web Service - a slow down?

Discussion in 'ASP .Net Web Services' started by Jonah Olsson, Aug 7, 2003.

  1. Jonah Olsson

    Jonah Olsson Guest

    Hi guys,

    I'm building a Web Service application to be run as an engine for some
    client web applications.
    The client application will be used as a shell to update and maintain a
    customer database where the Web Service acts as the engine containing all
    functions to interact with the SQL Server. One can see each client
    application as a terminal to the main Web Service application.

    Since all communication to the Web Service needs authentication, this
    information has to be sent to the Web Service each time it's called to be
    checked against the SQL Server. Will this slow down the process a lot?

    Example:
    Client updates info --> Call Web Service --> Authentication --> Update
    info --> Return results to client

    Does someone recommend a better solution to this? Or can I optimize the
    process?

    Thanks for any kind of help.

    Regards,
    Jonah Olsson
    Generation Software
     
    Jonah Olsson, Aug 7, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. It's possible to use Sessions to keep track of state (including
    authentication info) on the server side.

    In this case, the client would open a conversation (eg, session) with the
    server, passing the authentication info when the session is started. At
    that point the server would retain the authentication info on the server, in
    the session object. When the client connected again (a new request for a
    webmethod), then the server can examine the session and use the stored
    authentication info.

    example:
    http://samples.gotdotnet.com/quickstart/aspplus/doc/servicesandobjs.aspx

    This will not scale as well as a stateless model, where you authenticate
    with each webmethod request. But if you do not have extreme perf
    requirements, it may work just fine for you.

    The client needs to be aware of the session, and needs to use cookies.

    -Dino


    "Jonah Olsson" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Hi guys,
    >
    > I'm building a Web Service application to be run as an engine for some
    > client web applications.
    > The client application will be used as a shell to update and maintain a
    > customer database where the Web Service acts as the engine containing all
    > functions to interact with the SQL Server. One can see each client
    > application as a terminal to the main Web Service application.
    >
    > Since all communication to the Web Service needs authentication, this
    > information has to be sent to the Web Service each time it's called to be
    > checked against the SQL Server. Will this slow down the process a lot?
    >
    > Example:
    > Client updates info --> Call Web Service --> Authentication --> Update
    > info --> Return results to client
    >
    > Does someone recommend a better solution to this? Or can I optimize the
    > process?
    >
    > Thanks for any kind of help.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Jonah Olsson
    > Generation Software
    >
    >
     
    Dino Chiesa [MSFT], Aug 12, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. You may want to look at Remoting, it is better suited for this application,
    as you can make the service a singleton and thus eliminate the issue (Still
    will scale within the limits of the server memory etc)

    Tom
    --
    ==========================================
    = Tom Vande Stouwe MCSD.net, MCAD.net, MCP
    = 45Wallstreet.com (www.45wallstreet.com)
    = (803)-345-5001
    ==========================================
    = If you are not making any mistakes
    ..= ..you are not trying hard enough.
    ==========================================
    "Dino Chiesa [MSFT]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It's possible to use Sessions to keep track of state (including
    > authentication info) on the server side.
    >
    > In this case, the client would open a conversation (eg, session) with the
    > server, passing the authentication info when the session is started. At
    > that point the server would retain the authentication info on the server,

    in
    > the session object. When the client connected again (a new request for a
    > webmethod), then the server can examine the session and use the stored
    > authentication info.
    >
    > example:
    > http://samples.gotdotnet.com/quickstart/aspplus/doc/servicesandobjs.aspx
    >
    > This will not scale as well as a stateless model, where you authenticate
    > with each webmethod request. But if you do not have extreme perf
    > requirements, it may work just fine for you.
    >
    > The client needs to be aware of the session, and needs to use cookies.
    >
    > -Dino
    >
    >
    > "Jonah Olsson" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > > Hi guys,
    > >
    > > I'm building a Web Service application to be run as an engine for some
    > > client web applications.
    > > The client application will be used as a shell to update and maintain a
    > > customer database where the Web Service acts as the engine containing

    all
    > > functions to interact with the SQL Server. One can see each client
    > > application as a terminal to the main Web Service application.
    > >
    > > Since all communication to the Web Service needs authentication, this
    > > information has to be sent to the Web Service each time it's called to

    be
    > > checked against the SQL Server. Will this slow down the process a lot?
    > >
    > > Example:
    > > Client updates info --> Call Web Service --> Authentication --> Update
    > > info --> Return results to client
    > >
    > > Does someone recommend a better solution to this? Or can I optimize the
    > > process?
    > >
    > > Thanks for any kind of help.
    > >
    > > Regards,
    > > Jonah Olsson
    > > Generation Software
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Tom Vande Stouwe MCSD.net, Aug 12, 2003
    #3
  4. Jonah Olsson

    Jonah Olsson Guest

    Hi Dino,

    Thanks for your reply and help.
    I'll take a look at sessions, it sounds like a way to do it. I suppose
    handling sessions takes both less cpu and bandwidth than checking
    authorization against the SQL Server.

    Jonah

    "Dino Chiesa [MSFT]" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:...
    > It's possible to use Sessions to keep track of state (including
    > authentication info) on the server side.
    >
    > In this case, the client would open a conversation (eg, session) with the
    > server, passing the authentication info when the session is started. At
    > that point the server would retain the authentication info on the server,

    in
    > the session object. When the client connected again (a new request for a
    > webmethod), then the server can examine the session and use the stored
    > authentication info.
    >
    > example:
    > http://samples.gotdotnet.com/quickstart/aspplus/doc/servicesandobjs.aspx
    >
    > This will not scale as well as a stateless model, where you authenticate
    > with each webmethod request. But if you do not have extreme perf
    > requirements, it may work just fine for you.
    >
    > The client needs to be aware of the session, and needs to use cookies.
    >
    > -Dino
    >
    >
    > "Jonah Olsson" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    > > Hi guys,
    > >
    > > I'm building a Web Service application to be run as an engine for some
    > > client web applications.
    > > The client application will be used as a shell to update and maintain a
    > > customer database where the Web Service acts as the engine containing

    all
    > > functions to interact with the SQL Server. One can see each client
    > > application as a terminal to the main Web Service application.
    > >
    > > Since all communication to the Web Service needs authentication, this
    > > information has to be sent to the Web Service each time it's called to

    be
    > > checked against the SQL Server. Will this slow down the process a lot?
    > >
    > > Example:
    > > Client updates info --> Call Web Service --> Authentication --> Update
    > > info --> Return results to client
    > >
    > > Does someone recommend a better solution to this? Or can I optimize the
    > > process?
    > >
    > > Thanks for any kind of help.
    > >
    > > Regards,
    > > Jonah Olsson
    > > Generation Software
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Jonah Olsson, Aug 13, 2003
    #4
  5. Jonah Olsson

    Jonah Olsson Guest

    Tom,

    Doesn't Remoting require something installed on the server? I'm on shared
    hosting regarding the Web Service..

    Thanks.
    Jonah


    "Tom Vande Stouwe MCSD.net" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:%...
    > You may want to look at Remoting, it is better suited for this

    application,
    > as you can make the service a singleton and thus eliminate the issue

    (Still
    > will scale within the limits of the server memory etc)
     
    Jonah Olsson, Aug 13, 2003
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Replies:
    3
    Views:
    3,045
  2. Replies:
    2
    Views:
    811
    Nick de Graeve
    Feb 5, 2006
  3. RJ
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    778
    Brock Allen
    Sep 22, 2005
  4. PerlFAQ Server
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    96
    PerlFAQ Server
    Jan 17, 2011
  5. PerlFAQ Server
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    104
    PerlFAQ Server
    Mar 13, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page