Variable substitution

Discussion in 'Perl Misc' started by sebastien.godier@gmail.com, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Hello,

    My Perl script is first reading a text file containing a list of
    computer names I want to run a command against.
    The name of each computer is stored inside $_ variable.

    So, I'm trying to generate my external command using this variable
    inside a loop. Like this

    system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$_\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    Explorer\\Main\" /v \"Start Page");

    The problem is that $_ is not substituted at all. If I replace $_ by a
    real computer name, it works. But I don't know how to declare $_ as a
    variable in this line.

    Any idea welcome!

    Thanks
    Sebastien
     
    , Jan 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. Mirco Wahab Guest

    wrote:
    > So, I'm trying to generate my external command using this variable
    > inside a loop. Like this
    >
    > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$_\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    > Explorer\\Main\" /v \"Start Page");
    >
    > The problem is that $_ is not substituted at all. If I replace $_ by a
    > real computer name, it works. But I don't know how to declare $_ as a
    > variable in this line.


    Show your loop!

    Regards

    M.
     
    Mirco Wahab, Jan 17, 2007
    #2
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  3. Seb Guest

    Ok so here my complete script:


    ##############
    #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe -w
    #

    # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    exist.");

    # When a computer is unavailable, write it name to the log file.
    open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");

    # For debugging purpose
    open(DEBUGPING,">debug-ping.txt");
    open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">debug-commands.txt");

    system("cls");
    while (<INPUTFILE>) {
    $debugping = `ping -n 1 $_ 2>&1`;
    if ( $? >> 8 == 1 )
    {
    # That means the computers is unreachable. Exporting the name of such
    computers to the log file.
    print OUTPUTFILE "$_";
    # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    STDOUT
    chomp($_);
    print "\n\t\t\t $_ FAILED.";
    }
    else
    {
    # The computer is on the network. Let's run the commands against it.
    open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">>debug-commands.txt");
    print DEBUGCOMMANDS "$_\n";
    system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$cpname\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    Explorer\\Main\" /v \"Start Page");

    # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    STDOUT
    chomp($_);
    print "\n$_ successfull.";
    }
    print DEBUGPING $debugping;

    #############
     
    Seb, Jan 17, 2007
    #3
  4. -berlin.de Guest

    Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > Ok so here my complete script:


    [snipped except]

    > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$cpname\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet


    The variable $cpname you try to interpolate is nowhere defined. If
    you had switched on warnings, Perl would have told you so.

    Change $cpname to $_ and it will work. And, please, before you
    ask hundreds of people for help, take *one* close look at your code.

    Anno
     
    -berlin.de, Jan 17, 2007
    #4
  5. Seb Guest

    -berlin.de a écrit :
    > Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > > Ok so here my complete script:

    >
    > [snipped except]
    >
    > > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$cpname\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet

    >
    > The variable $cpname you try to interpolate is nowhere defined. If
    > you had switched on warnings, Perl would have told you so.
    >
    > Change $cpname to $_ and it will work. And, please, before you
    > ask hundreds of people for help, take *one* close look at your code.
    >
    > Anno


    Will searching the solution, I realized that I posted a wrong version
    of my script. I deleted it and now here is the good one.

    ###############
    #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe
    #

    # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    exist.");

    # When a computer is unavailable, write it name to the log file.
    open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");

    # For debugging purpose
    open(DEBUGPING,">debug-ping.txt");
    open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">debug-commands.txt");

    system("cls");
    while (<INPUTFILE>) {
    $debugping = `ping -n 1 $_ 2>&1`;
    if ( $? >> 8 == 1 )
    {
    # That means the computers is unreachable. Exporting the name of such
    computers to the log file.
    print OUTPUTFILE "$_";
    # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    STDOUT
    chomp($_);
    print "\n\t\t\t $_ FAILED.";
    }
    else
    {
    # The computer is on the network. Let's run the commands against it.
    open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">>debug-commands.txt");
    print DEBUGCOMMANDS "$_\n";
    system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$_\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    Explorer\\Main\" /v \"Start Page");

    # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    STDOUT
    chomp($_);
    print "\n$_ successfull.";
    }
    print DEBUGPING $debugping;
    }

    ##########

    So to answer you Anno, this typo was not the source of my problem. This
    is the script causing me problem. $_ is not getting subsituted
    correctly. But replacing $_ by a real computer name works fine.

    Sebastien
     
    Seb, Jan 17, 2007
    #5
  6. -berlin.de Guest

    Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > -berlin.de a écrit :
    > > Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > > > Ok so here my complete script:

    > >
    > > [snipped except]
    > >
    > > > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$cpname\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet

    > >
    > > The variable $cpname you try to interpolate is nowhere defined. If
    > > you had switched on warnings, Perl would have told you so.
    > >
    > > Change $cpname to $_ and it will work. And, please, before you
    > > ask hundreds of people for help, take *one* close look at your code.
    > >
    > > Anno

    >
    > Will searching the solution, I realized that I posted a wrong version
    > of my script. I deleted it and now here is the good one.


    Oh boy... Please take some more care with your postings.

    > ###############
    > #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe
    > #
    >
    > # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    > open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    > exist.");
    >
    > # When a computer is unavailable, write it name to the log file.
    > open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");
    >
    > # For debugging purpose
    > open(DEBUGPING,">debug-ping.txt");
    > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">debug-commands.txt");
    >
    > system("cls");
    > while (<INPUTFILE>) {
    > $debugping = `ping -n 1 $_ 2>&1`;
    > if ( $? >> 8 == 1 )
    > {
    > # That means the computers is unreachable. Exporting the name of such
    > computers to the log file.
    > print OUTPUTFILE "$_";
    > # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    > STDOUT
    > chomp($_);
    > print "\n\t\t\t $_ FAILED.";
    > }
    > else
    > {
    > # The computer is on the network. Let's run the commands against it.
    > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">>debug-commands.txt");
    > print DEBUGCOMMANDS "$_\n";
    > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$_\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    > Explorer\\Main\" /v \"Start Page");
    >
    > # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    > STDOUT
    > chomp($_);
    > print "\n$_ successfull.";
    > }
    > print DEBUGPING $debugping;
    > }
    >
    > ##########
    >
    > So to answer you Anno, this typo was not the source of my problem.


    Too bad you wasted everybody's time with it.

    > This
    > is the script causing me problem. $_ is not getting subsituted
    > correctly. But replacing $_ by a real computer name works fine.


    How do you know $_ is not substituted? Have you printed the string
    instead of giving it to system(), so you can see what's actually in
    there?

    I have done so after making runnable code from your text. I made $_
    contain "xxxxxxxxx" and it printed

    REG QUERY "\\xxxxxxxxx\HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\Internet Explorer\Main"
    /v "Start Page

    on a single line. How is that not what you would expect?

    Anno
     
    -berlin.de, Jan 17, 2007
    #6
  7. Seb Guest

    -berlin.de a écrit :
    > Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > > -berlin.de a écrit :
    > > > Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > > > > Ok so here my complete script:
    > > >
    > > > [snipped except]
    > > >
    > > > > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$cpname\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    > > >
    > > > The variable $cpname you try to interpolate is nowhere defined. If
    > > > you had switched on warnings, Perl would have told you so.
    > > >
    > > > Change $cpname to $_ and it will work. And, please, before you
    > > > ask hundreds of people for help, take *one* close look at your code.
    > > >
    > > > Anno

    > >
    > > Will searching the solution, I realized that I posted a wrong version
    > > of my script. I deleted it and now here is the good one.

    >
    > Oh boy... Please take some more care with your postings.
    >
    > > ###############
    > > #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe
    > > #
    > >
    > > # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    > > open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    > > exist.");
    > >
    > > # When a computer is unavailable, write it name to the log file.
    > > open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");
    > >
    > > # For debugging purpose
    > > open(DEBUGPING,">debug-ping.txt");
    > > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">debug-commands.txt");
    > >
    > > system("cls");
    > > while (<INPUTFILE>) {
    > > $debugping = `ping -n 1 $_ 2>&1`;
    > > if ( $? >> 8 == 1 )
    > > {
    > > # That means the computers is unreachable. Exporting the name of such
    > > computers to the log file.
    > > print OUTPUTFILE "$_";
    > > # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    > > STDOUT
    > > chomp($_);
    > > print "\n\t\t\t $_ FAILED.";
    > > }
    > > else
    > > {
    > > # The computer is on the network. Let's run the commands against it.
    > > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">>debug-commands.txt");
    > > print DEBUGCOMMANDS "$_\n";
    > > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$_\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    > > Explorer\\Main\" /v \"Start Page");
    > >
    > > # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    > > STDOUT
    > > chomp($_);
    > > print "\n$_ successfull.";
    > > }
    > > print DEBUGPING $debugping;
    > > }
    > >
    > > ##########
    > >
    > > So to answer you Anno, this typo was not the source of my problem.

    >
    > Too bad you wasted everybody's time with it.
    >
    > > This
    > > is the script causing me problem. $_ is not getting subsituted
    > > correctly. But replacing $_ by a real computer name works fine.

    >
    > How do you know $_ is not substituted? Have you printed the string
    > instead of giving it to system(), so you can see what's actually in
    > there?
    >
    > I have done so after making runnable code from your text. I made $_
    > contain "xxxxxxxxx" and it printed
    >
    > REG QUERY "\\xxxxxxxxx\HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\Internet Explorer\Main"
    > /v "Start Page
    >
    > on a single line. How is that not what you would expect?
    >
    > Anno



    You put me on the way !! The problem comes from the new line character.
    In other word, the REG QUERY line is splitted like this due to this
    character:

    REG QUERY "\\xxxxxxxxx
    \HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\Internet Explorer\Main"

    So, I must remove this character from $_. Trying with chomp($_) is not
    making it. But I think I can succeed using a temporar variable.

    Sebastien
     
    Seb, Jan 17, 2007
    #7
  8. Seb Guest

    -berlin.de a écrit :
    > Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > > -berlin.de a écrit :
    > > > Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > > > > Ok so here my complete script:
    > > >
    > > > [snipped except]
    > > >
    > > > > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$cpname\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    > > >
    > > > The variable $cpname you try to interpolate is nowhere defined. If
    > > > you had switched on warnings, Perl would have told you so.
    > > >
    > > > Change $cpname to $_ and it will work. And, please, before you
    > > > ask hundreds of people for help, take *one* close look at your code.
    > > >
    > > > Anno

    > >
    > > Will searching the solution, I realized that I posted a wrong version
    > > of my script. I deleted it and now here is the good one.

    >
    > Oh boy... Please take some more care with your postings.
    >
    > > ###############
    > > #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe
    > > #
    > >
    > > # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    > > open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    > > exist.");
    > >
    > > # When a computer is unavailable, write it name to the log file.
    > > open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");
    > >
    > > # For debugging purpose
    > > open(DEBUGPING,">debug-ping.txt");
    > > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">debug-commands.txt");
    > >
    > > system("cls");
    > > while (<INPUTFILE>) {
    > > $debugping = `ping -n 1 $_ 2>&1`;
    > > if ( $? >> 8 == 1 )
    > > {
    > > # That means the computers is unreachable. Exporting the name of such
    > > computers to the log file.
    > > print OUTPUTFILE "$_";
    > > # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    > > STDOUT
    > > chomp($_);
    > > print "\n\t\t\t $_ FAILED.";
    > > }
    > > else
    > > {
    > > # The computer is on the network. Let's run the commands against it.
    > > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">>debug-commands.txt");
    > > print DEBUGCOMMANDS "$_\n";
    > > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$_\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    > > Explorer\\Main\" /v \"Start Page");
    > >
    > > # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    > > STDOUT
    > > chomp($_);
    > > print "\n$_ successfull.";
    > > }
    > > print DEBUGPING $debugping;
    > > }
    > >
    > > ##########
    > >
    > > So to answer you Anno, this typo was not the source of my problem.

    >
    > Too bad you wasted everybody's time with it.
    >
    > > This
    > > is the script causing me problem. $_ is not getting subsituted
    > > correctly. But replacing $_ by a real computer name works fine.

    >
    > How do you know $_ is not substituted? Have you printed the string
    > instead of giving it to system(), so you can see what's actually in
    > there?
    >
    > I have done so after making runnable code from your text. I made $_
    > contain "xxxxxxxxx" and it printed
    >
    > REG QUERY "\\xxxxxxxxx\HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\Internet Explorer\Main"
    > /v "Start Page
    >
    > on a single line. How is that not what you would expect?
    >
    > Anno



    You put me on the way !! The problem comes from the new line character
    at the end of $_ variable. In other word, the REG QUERY line is
    splitted like this due to this character:

    REG QUERY "\\xxxxxxxxx
    \HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\Internet Explorer\Main"

    So, I must remove this character from $_. Trying with chomp($_) is not
    making it. But I think I can succeed using a temporar variable.

    Sebastien
     
    Seb, Jan 17, 2007
    #8
  9. Seb Guest

    Seb a écrit :
    > -berlin.de a écrit :
    > > Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > > > -berlin.de a écrit :
    > > > > Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > > > > > Ok so here my complete script:
    > > > >
    > > > > [snipped except]
    > > > >
    > > > > > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$cpname\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    > > > >
    > > > > The variable $cpname you try to interpolate is nowhere defined. If
    > > > > you had switched on warnings, Perl would have told you so.
    > > > >
    > > > > Change $cpname to $_ and it will work. And, please, before you
    > > > > ask hundreds of people for help, take *one* close look at your code.
    > > > >
    > > > > Anno
    > > >
    > > > Will searching the solution, I realized that I posted a wrong version
    > > > of my script. I deleted it and now here is the good one.

    > >
    > > Oh boy... Please take some more care with your postings.
    > >
    > > > ###############
    > > > #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe
    > > > #
    > > >
    > > > # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    > > > open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    > > > exist.");
    > > >
    > > > # When a computer is unavailable, write it name to the log file.
    > > > open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");
    > > >
    > > > # For debugging purpose
    > > > open(DEBUGPING,">debug-ping.txt");
    > > > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">debug-commands.txt");
    > > >
    > > > system("cls");
    > > > while (<INPUTFILE>) {
    > > > $debugping = `ping -n 1 $_ 2>&1`;
    > > > if ( $? >> 8 == 1 )
    > > > {
    > > > # That means the computers is unreachable. Exporting the name of such
    > > > computers to the log file.
    > > > print OUTPUTFILE "$_";
    > > > # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    > > > STDOUT
    > > > chomp($_);
    > > > print "\n\t\t\t $_ FAILED.";
    > > > }
    > > > else
    > > > {
    > > > # The computer is on the network. Let's run the commands against it.
    > > > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">>debug-commands.txt");
    > > > print DEBUGCOMMANDS "$_\n";
    > > > system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$_\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet
    > > > Explorer\\Main\" /v \"Start Page");
    > > >
    > > > # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    > > > STDOUT
    > > > chomp($_);
    > > > print "\n$_ successfull.";
    > > > }
    > > > print DEBUGPING $debugping;
    > > > }
    > > >
    > > > ##########
    > > >
    > > > So to answer you Anno, this typo was not the source of my problem.

    > >
    > > Too bad you wasted everybody's time with it.
    > >
    > > > This
    > > > is the script causing me problem. $_ is not getting subsituted
    > > > correctly. But replacing $_ by a real computer name works fine.

    > >
    > > How do you know $_ is not substituted? Have you printed the string
    > > instead of giving it to system(), so you can see what's actually in
    > > there?
    > >
    > > I have done so after making runnable code from your text. I made $_
    > > contain "xxxxxxxxx" and it printed
    > >
    > > REG QUERY "\\xxxxxxxxx\HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\Internet Explorer\Main"
    > > /v "Start Page
    > >
    > > on a single line. How is that not what you would expect?
    > >
    > > Anno

    >
    >
    > You put me on the way !! The problem comes from the new line character
    > at the end of $_ variable. In other word, the REG QUERY line is
    > splitted like this due to this character:
    >
    > REG QUERY "\\xxxxxxxxx
    > \HKLM\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\Internet Explorer\Main"
    >
    > So, I must remove this character from $_. Trying with chomp($_) is not
    > making it. But I think I can succeed using a temporar variable.
    >
    > Sebastien



    Yeah, here is a working version

    ######
    #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe
    #

    # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    exist.");

    # When a computer is unavailable, write it name to the log file.
    open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");

    # For debugging purpose
    open(DEBUGPING,">debug-ping.txt");
    open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">debug-commands.txt");

    system("cls");
    while (<INPUTFILE>) {
    $debugping = `ping -n 1 $_ 2>&1`;
    if ( $? >> 8 == 1 )
    {
    # That means the computers is unreachable. Exporting the name of such
    computers to the log file.
    print OUTPUTFILE "$_";
    # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    STDOUT
    chomp($_);
    print "\n\t\t\t $_ FAILED.";
    }
    else
    {
    # The computer is on the network. Let's run the commands against it.
    open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">>debug-commands.txt");
    print DEBUGCOMMANDS "$_\n";
    $computer = $_;
    $computer =~ s/\s+$//;
    system ("REG QUERY
    \"\\\\$computer\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet Explorer\\Main\"
    /v \"Start Page\"");

    # chomp remove the \n from $_ variable to print it correctly to
    STDOUT
    chomp($_);
    print "\n$_ successfull.";
    }
    print DEBUGPING $debugping;
    }

    ######

    Many thanks Anno !!
    Sebastien
     
    Seb, Jan 17, 2007
    #9
  10. On 01/17/2007 08:32 AM, Seb wrote:
    > -berlin.de a écrit :
    >> Seb <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    >>> Ok so here my complete script:

    >> [snipped except]
    >>
    >>> system ("REG QUERY \"\\\\$cpname\\HKLM\\SOFTWARE\\MICROSOFT\\Internet

    >> The variable $cpname you try to interpolate is nowhere defined. If
    >> you had switched on warnings, Perl would have told you so.
    >>
    >> Change $cpname to $_ and it will work. And, please, before you
    >> ask hundreds of people for help, take *one* close look at your code.
    >>
    >> Anno

    >
    > Will searching the solution, I realized that I posted a wrong version
    > of my script. I deleted it and now here is the good one.
    >
    > ###############
    > #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe
    > #
    >
    > # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    > open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    > exist.");
    >
    > # When a computer is unavailable, write it name to the log file.
    > open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");
    >
    > # For debugging purpose
    > open(DEBUGPING,">debug-ping.txt");
    > open(DEBUGCOMMANDS,">debug-commands.txt");
    >
    > system("cls");
    > while (<INPUTFILE>) {


    Print out $_ before you try to ping it. I suspect that it has a newline
    sequence on the end of it.


    > $debugping = `ping -n 1 $_ 2>&1`;
    > if ( $? >> 8 == 1 )
    > {
    > # That means the computers is unreachable. Exporting the name of such
    > computers to the log file. [...]



    --
    Windows Vista and your freedom in conflict:
    http://www.badvista.org/
     
    Mumia W. (NOSPAM), Jan 17, 2007
    #10
  11. Seb <> wrote:

    > #!C:\Perl\bin\perl.exe -w


    > # Read the list of computer to run the script against
    > open(INPUTFILE,"computers.txt") || die ("File $INPUTFILE does not
    > exist.");



    You do not read anything there, so the comment is misleading.

    You should not ignore warning messages.

    If the file does not exist, your error message will say:

    File does not exist. at ...

    If the file does exist, but fails for some other reason
    (eg. permission denied), your error message will say:

    File does not exist. at ...

    You should let perl give the reason why instead of guessing one
    particlar reason on your own:

    my $fname = 'computers.txt';
    open(INPUTFILE, $fname) || die ("File '$fname' does not exist: $!");
    ^^
    ^^

    > open(OUTPUTFILE,">errors.txt");



    You should always, yes *always*, check the return value from open().


    > print OUTPUTFILE "$_";



    print OUTPUTFILE $_;
    or
    print OUTPUTFILE;


    See:

    perldoc -q vars

    What’s wrong with always quoting "$vars"?


    --
    Tad McClellan SGML consulting
    Perl programming
    Fort Worth, Texas
     
    Tad McClellan, Jan 17, 2007
    #11
  12. Seb Guest

    Thanks for your valuables advises Tad.

    Sebastien.
     
    Seb, Jan 18, 2007
    #12
    1. Advertising

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