VB(ish) replacement

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Dave Boland, Jul 20, 2004.

  1. Dave Boland

    Dave Boland Guest

    The other day I was asked if there is an open source replacement for VB6
    that is cross-platform. I spent a little bit of time at Barnes-Noble
    and looking at news groups, but don't have a good answer. Hope you can
    help without geting into a language war. These will be for commercial
    applications with a GUI.

    What they seem to be looking for is:
    1. High level language, but not necessarly VB compatible.
    2. OOP
    3. Reasonalble learning curve
    4. Cross-platform
    5. IDE and ability to graphically design windows.
    6. Distribute programs as .exe's, so some sort of compiler needed.
    7. Serial communications library (RS-232, 485, USB)
    8. SNMP library
    9. Good performance (not expected to be as fast as C/C++)
    10. Windows are native to each O.S.
    11. Database support of Access and MySQL

    It looks like any of the three languages have most or all of what they
    need, but I don't use scripting languages enough to give a good answer.

    Dave,
     
    Dave Boland, Jul 20, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Dave Boland wrote:

    > What they seem to be looking for is:
    > 1. High level language, but not necessarly VB compatible.
    > 2. OOP
    > 3. Reasonalble learning curve
    > 4. Cross-platform


    Ruby has all these features. Blocks are a very handy tool for high-level
    programming and Ruby's OOP model is part of its design and is very
    consistently used throughout the language. The basics of Ruby are easy
    to understand and I guess that new users will be able to program simple
    things in it fluently in ~3 days. There'll be more to learn after that,
    but it should all feel like natural extensions of the basics.

    > 5. IDE and ability to graphically design windows.


    There are IDEs, ArachnoRuby[1], and FreeRide[2] come to mind. There's
    also a plug-in for Eclipse[3], but it still looks to be in an early
    stage. AFAIK there's no way of using Ruby in a Delphi-style way for
    designing windows yes, but this should be possible with Gtk[4]. (Gtk
    lets you load windows from XML files and there are stand-alone editors
    like Glade[5] available for that format.)

    But still, I'd say that there's nothing that's as polished as Visual
    Basic's IDE available yet.

    > 6. Distribute programs as .exe's, so some sort of compiler needed.


    This is possible with ExeRb[6] or RubyScript2Exe[7].

    > 7. Serial communications library (RS-232, 485, USB)


    A search on the Ruby Application Archive[8] turned up Ruby/SerialPort[9]
    and Win32Serial[10] -- I've not used them yet so I don't know if they're
    able to do everything you need. However Ruby lets you easily (way easier
    than the other languages on your list) write extensions in C and other
    languages so you could still add functionality in this area yourself in
    case everything else fails.

    > 8. SNMP library


    I'm no expert in this area. A quick search on Google turned up
    http://blog.humlab.umu.se/samuel/archives/000495.html -- it appears that
    Ruby only has basic functionality for this right now, but that you can
    still use the snmpget tool directly.

    > 9. Good performance (not expected to be as fast as C/C++)


    Ruby is slower than both Perl and Python -- I don't know if it's too
    slow for you, but I'd suppose that some benchmarks might give you
    definitive answers. Ruby's performance might change with Rite or a
    Parrot-based Ruby. (But both won't be released in the closer future.)

    > 10. Windows are native to each O.S.


    This is possible with RubyGtk if you use a native renderer. Such a
    native renderer for windows is WIMP[11]. I've used this and it seems to
    look nifty. Here are some screen shots:

    - http://noegnud.sourceforge.net/flgr/der_nativ.png (Gtk-based X-Chat2)
    - http://noegnud.sourceforge.net/flgr/als_ob_flgr_arbeitet.png
    (Freeciv, a Gtk-based game and a custom Ruby application which uses
    RubyGtk. I'm using a non-standard Windows XP theme here.)

    There are also other Toolkits available from within Ruby. I've heard
    that wxRuby[12] (wrapper for wxWidgets) aims to look native on a lot of
    platforms, but I've not really used myself yet. Another one you might
    want to have a look at is FXRuby[13].

    I've only really used Ruby/Gtk myself yet (for my usage it seemed to
    have the nicest Ruby bindings) -- maybe somebody else can offer a
    detailed comparison between the different toolkits...

    > 11. Database support of Access and MySQL


    You can either use MySQL directly via MySQL/Ruby[14] or you can use the
    higher-level Ruby/DBI[15].

    There's also the very high-level ActiveRecord[16] which tries to
    abstract SQL away as efficiently as possible. It's a very impressive
    project and has received great feedback.

    The only way I can find for using access is directly via COM right now.
    This would be done with Win32Ole[17].

    Here are the URLs for the libraries and projects I mentioned:

    [1] http://www.scriptolutions.com/arachno_ruby.php
    [2] http://freeride.rubyforge.org/wiki/wiki.pl
    [3] http://rubyeclipse.sourceforge.net/
    [4] http://ruby-gnome2.sourceforge.jp/
    [5] http://glade.gnome.org/
    [6] http://exerb.sourceforge.jp/index.en.html
    [7] http://www.erikveen.dds.nl/rubyscript2exe/index.html
    [8] http://raa.ruby-lang.org/
    [9] http://ruby-serialport.rubyforge.org/
    [10] http://grub.ath.cx/win32serial/
    [11] http://gtk-wimp.sourceforge.net/
    [12] http://wxruby.rubyforge.org/
    [13] http://www.fxruby.org/
    [14] http://www.tmtm.org/en/mysql/ruby/
    [15] http://ruby-dbi.rubyforge.org/
    [16] http://activerecord.rubyonrails.org/
    [17] http://raa.ruby-lang.org/project/win32ole/

    Regards,
    Florian Gross
     
    Florian Gross, Jul 20, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Dave Boland

    Larry Bates Guest

    Others have answered most of the other questions.

    > 11. Database support of Access and MySQL


    Access databases can be accessed via ODBC,
    DAO, or ADO interfaces on Windows. MySQL has
    native interface from Python.

    Questions you didn't ask:

    12) Can interface to existing COM+ objects, write new
    COM+ objects and write Windows services.

    Python

    13) Can write scripts, applications (console and GUI),
    and web services with single language.

    Python

    14) Has extensive standard library to support email
    (SMTP, IMAP), FTP, HTTP, logging, regular expressions,
    arrays, and many more. Third party libraries for
    imaging (Python Imaging Library), PDF generation
    (ReportLab), Graphing (ReportLab Graphics) and
    XML parsing (PyRXP by ReportLab). Just to name a
    few.

    Python

    15) Easy to write C language extensions for language

    Python

    16) Code that you can actually understand when you
    come back to read it a year later.

    Python (priceless ;-)

    You might want to take a look at the experience of
    another company:

    http://python.oreilly.com/news/disney_0201.html

    HTH,
    Larry Bates
    Syscon, Inc.

    "Dave Boland" <> wrote in message
    news:FacLc.51848$...
    > The other day I was asked if there is an open source replacement for VB6
    > that is cross-platform. I spent a little bit of time at Barnes-Noble
    > and looking at news groups, but don't have a good answer. Hope you can
    > help without geting into a language war. These will be for commercial
    > applications with a GUI.
    >
    > What they seem to be looking for is:
    > 1. High level language, but not necessarly VB compatible.
    > 2. OOP
    > 3. Reasonalble learning curve
    > 4. Cross-platform
    > 5. IDE and ability to graphically design windows.
    > 6. Distribute programs as .exe's, so some sort of compiler needed.
    > 7. Serial communications library (RS-232, 485, USB)
    > 8. SNMP library
    > 9. Good performance (not expected to be as fast as C/C++)
    > 10. Windows are native to each O.S.
    > 11. Database support of Access and MySQL
    >
    > It looks like any of the three languages have most or all of what they
    > need, but I don't use scripting languages enough to give a good answer.
    >
    > Dave,
    >
     
    Larry Bates, Jul 20, 2004
    #3
  4. Dave Boland

    Scott Rubin Guest

    Dave Boland wrote:
    > The other day I was asked if there is an open source replacement for VB6
    > that is cross-platform. I spent a little bit of time at Barnes-Noble
    > and looking at news groups, but don't have a good answer. Hope you can
    > help without geting into a language war. These will be for commercial
    > applications with a GUI.
    >
    > What they seem to be looking for is:
    > 1. High level language, but not necessarly VB compatible.
    > 2. OOP
    > 3. Reasonalble learning curve
    > 4. Cross-platform
    > 5. IDE and ability to graphically design windows.
    > 6. Distribute programs as .exe's, so some sort of compiler needed.
    > 7. Serial communications library (RS-232, 485, USB)
    > 8. SNMP library
    > 9. Good performance (not expected to be as fast as C/C++)
    > 10. Windows are native to each O.S.
    > 11. Database support of Access and MySQL
    >
    > It looks like any of the three languages have most or all of what they
    > need, but I don't use scripting languages enough to give a good answer.
    >
    > Dave,
    >


    I'm fairly certain you can use python and glade together to make cross
    platform GTK+ guis in a graphical way. I'm also fairly certain that it
    meets all your requirements. There might be a way to use glade with
    other gtk supporting languages. Also, KDevelop I think can do the same
    with Qt stuff, but I don't know for sure since I haven't used it in a
    long time. Don't you have any programmers who can make guis the "real"
    way instead of drawing them with a VB type interface? it's not that hard
    if you draw them on paper with a pencil and plan them out first.

    -Scott
     
    Scott Rubin, Jul 20, 2004
    #4
  5. On Jul 20, 2004, at 11:27 AM, Larry Bates wrote:
    >
    > 15) Easy to write C language extensions for language
    >
    > Python


    As easy as or easier than Ruby?
    -Charlie
     
    Charles Mills, Jul 20, 2004
    #5
  6. Larry Bates wrote:
    > Others have answered most of the other questions.
    >
    >
    >>11. Database support of Access and MySQL

    >
    >
    > Access databases can be accessed via ODBC,
    > DAO, or ADO interfaces on Windows. MySQL has
    > native interface from Python.


    Ruby has this all, too ;-)

    > Questions you didn't ask:
    >
    > 12) Can interface to existing COM+ objects, write new
    > COM+ objects and write Windows services.
    >
    > Python


    Not sure, but with Ruby you can access COM objects, script Excel for
    example...

    > 13) Can write scripts, applications (console and GUI),
    > and web services with single language.
    >
    > Python


    Ruby, too ;-)

    Ruby has a cool SOAP implementation and WSDL.

    > 14) Has extensive standard library to support email
    > (SMTP, IMAP), FTP, HTTP, logging, regular expressions,
    > arrays, and many more. Third party libraries for
    > imaging (Python Imaging Library), PDF generation
    > (ReportLab), Graphing (ReportLab Graphics) and
    > XML parsing (PyRXP by ReportLab). Just to name a
    > few.


    SMTP, IMAP, FTP, HTTP, logging, regexps, arrays all standard in Ruby.
    XML parser (REXML), YAML, SOAP and XMLRPC comes with Ruby by default.
    ...

    > Python


    Ruby ;-)

    > 15) Easy to write C language extensions for language
    >
    > Python


    Very easy in Ruby, too.

    > 16) Code that you can actually understand when you
    > come back to read it a year later.
    >
    > Python (priceless ;-)


    Ruby ;-)

    > You might want to take a look at the experience of
    > another company:
    >
    > http://python.oreilly.com/news/disney_0201.html


    http://www.rubygarden.org/ruby?RealWorldRuby

    >>What they seem to be looking for is:
    >>1. High level language, but not necessarly VB compatible.


    Ruby: very high level

    >>2. OOP


    Ruby: pure OO (designed from the beginning on)

    >>3. Reasonalble learning curve


    Ruby: it's easy to get started, but there are lots of tricky details
    (you only have to learn them if you're interested)

    >>4. Cross-platform


    Ruby. But Windows support in Ruby is not as good as in Python (AFAIK),
    but there is a Windows Installer version available, which comes bundled
    with lots of stuff.

    >>5. IDE and ability to graphically design windows.


    Arachno Ruby IDE. Commercial, but still alpha or beta release. Available
    for Python, Perl and PHP, too. Lot's of features. Made in Germany ;-)

    Design Windows: If Qt is an option (it costs a bit of money when used on
    Windows or commercially), there's a brand new Qt/Kde binding for Ruby
    based on Smoke.

    http://developer.kde.org/language-bindings/ruby/index.html

    With this, you can use all Qt and KDE widgets, and AFAIK even without
    compiling any C sources (once you've compiled the Ruby-Smoke bindings).

    Alternatively, there are FXRuby (www.fxruby.org), wxRuby
    (wxruby.rubyforge.org), Tk or fltk bindings. But no usable graphical
    designers for those.

    >>6. Distribute programs as .exe's, so some sort of compiler needed.


    available in Ruby: exerb

    http://exerb.sourceforge.jp/index.en.html

    >>7. Serial communications library (RS-232, 485, USB)


    RS-232 libraries are available in Ruby. don't know about USB, but should
    be easy to write a wrapper around libusb on linux. Don't know about Windows.

    >>8. SNMP library


    Several libraries in Ruby:

    http://raa.ruby-lang.org/search.rhtml?search=snmp

    Even one written in pure Ruby (brand new, only a few days old).

    >>9. Good performance (not expected to be as fast as C/C++)


    depends. Python is probably faster than Ruby, but not much (unless you
    use psyco etc.).

    >>10. Windows are native to each O.S.


    wxRuby (not as major as wxPython, my personal feeling was, that's quite
    slow). But I'd prefer FxRuby (Windows-like look on each platform).

    >>11. Database support of Access and MySQL


    Ruby/ODBC, two mysql libraries for Ruby. Ruby/DBI has ADO, ODBC and
    Mysql drivers.

    Of course Python is better known, and there are more commercial projects
    written in Python than in Ruby.

    For more libraries, Ruby's Application Archive is your friend:
    http://raa.ruby-lang.org

    Regards,

    Michael
     
    Michael Neumann, Jul 20, 2004
    #6
  7. Larry Bates wrote:

    >>11. Database support of Access and MySQL

    > Access databases can be accessed via ODBC,
    > DAO, or ADO interfaces on Windows. MySQL has
    > native interface from Python.


    Using these new keywords I had another look at RAA and also found
    Ruby/ODBC[1].

    > Questions you didn't ask:
    >
    > 12) Can interface to existing COM+ objects, write new
    > COM+ objects and write Windows services.
    > Python


    And also Ruby. I already mentioned that COM is possible through Win32OLE
    and Windows services can be done with the Win32Utils[2].

    > 13) Can write scripts, applications (console and GUI),
    > and web services with single language.
    > Python


    And also Ruby. For web services we have eRuby (via mod_ruby)[3],
    FastCGI[4]. There's a lot of templating engines and Instiki[5] is a nice
    success story for using Ruby on the Web.

    > 14) Has extensive standard library to support email
    > (SMTP, IMAP), FTP, HTTP, logging, regular expressions,
    > arrays, and many more. Third party libraries for
    > imaging (Python Imaging Library), PDF generation
    > (ReportLab), Graphing (ReportLab Graphics) and
    > XML parsing (PyRXP by ReportLab). Just to name a
    > few.
    > Python


    And also Ruby. Net protocol support (SMTP, POP, IMAP, FTP, HTTP, HTTPS)
    and XML parsing (through REXML)[6] and a complete Web application
    plattform (WebRick)[7] and also rich RPC capatibilities (via DRb[8] or
    xmlrpc[9]) are part of the Standard Library.

    PDF generation is available via PDF::Writer[10] and PDFLib[11], image
    generation can be done with RMagick[12] or gRuby[13].

    Advanced logging is usually done with Log4R[14].

    There's more, but I can't list all of them, of course.

    > 15) Easy to write C language extensions for language
    > Python


    This is actually seems to be easier in Ruby.

    > 16) Code that you can actually understand when you
    > come back to read it a year later.
    > Python (priceless ;-)


    Ruby is the clearest language I've seen yet and compared to Python some
    critical things were in it from the beginning and not added as an
    afterthought. (OOP comes to mind.)

    > You might want to take a look at the experience of
    > another company:
    > http://python.oreilly.com/news/disney_0201.html


    Ruby isn't widely used yet, but we already have some pretty interesting
    success stories[15]: NASA, Motorola and IBM are three big corporations
    already using Ruby.

    More URLs:

    [1] http://raa.ruby-lang.org/project/ruby-odbc/
    [2] http://rubyforge.org/projects/win32utils/
    [3] http://modruby.net/en/
    [4] http://www.fastcgi.com/
    [5] http://www.instiki.org/show/HomePage
    [6] http://www.germane-software.com/software/rexml/
    {7] http://www.webrick.org/
    [8] http://www.eng.cse.dmu.ac.uk/~hgs/ruby/dRuby/
    [9] http://www.fantasy-coders.de/ruby/xmlrpc4r/
    [10] http://www.halostatue.ca/ruby/PDF__Writer.html
    [11] http://www-ps.kek.jp/thitoshi/ruby/pdflib/index.html
    [12] http://rmagick.rubyforge.org/
    [13] http://gruby.sourceforge.jp/index.en.html
    [14] http://log4r.sourceforge.net/
    [15] http://www.rubygarden.org/ruby?RealWorldRuby

    Regards,
    Florian Gross
     
    Florian Gross, Jul 20, 2004
    #7
  8. Dave Boland

    John J. Lee Guest

    Dave Boland <> writes:
    [...]
    > What they seem to be looking for is:
    > 1. High level language, but not necessarly VB compatible.
    > 2. OOP
    > 3. Reasonalble learning curve
    > 4. Cross-platform
    > 5. IDE and ability to graphically design windows.
    > 6. Distribute programs as .exe's, so some sort of compiler needed.
    > 7. Serial communications library (RS-232, 485, USB)
    > 8. SNMP library
    > 9. Good performance (not expected to be as fast as C/C++)
    > 10. Windows are native to each O.S.
    > 11. Database support of Access and MySQL
    >
    > It looks like any of the three languages have most or all of what they
    > need, but I don't use scripting languages enough to give a good answer.


    Can't speak for Ruby, but I'm fairly sure both Perl and Python do fine
    on all points but 3.

    Python does fine on the remaining point. Perl fails *badly* here:

    http://www.google.com/groups?threadm=&selm=D87u12z90eq.fsf%40pobox.com


    I've used a fair number of programming languages. Perl is the only
    one I'd unhesitatingly call 'pathological'. And I do speak as an
    admirer of the language: before Python was around and well-supported,
    it served an important purpose. Now, though, it fills a much-needed
    gap <wink>


    John
     
    John J. Lee, Jul 20, 2004
    #8
  9. In article <>, John J. Lee <> wrote:
    >Dave Boland <> writes:
    >[...]
    >> What they seem to be looking for is:
    >> 1. High level language, but not necessarly VB compatible.
    >> 2. OOP
    >> 3. Reasonalble learning curve
    >> 4. Cross-platform
    >> 5. IDE and ability to graphically design windows.
    >> 6. Distribute programs as .exe's, so some sort of compiler needed.
    >> 7. Serial communications library (RS-232, 485, USB)
    >> 8. SNMP library
    >> 9. Good performance (not expected to be as fast as C/C++)
    >> 10. Windows are native to each O.S.
    >> 11. Database support of Access and MySQL
    >>
    >> It looks like any of the three languages have most or all of what they
    >> need, but I don't use scripting languages enough to give a good answer.

    >
    >Can't speak for Ruby, but I'm fairly sure both Perl and Python do fine
    >on all points but 3.
    >
    >Python does fine on the remaining point. Perl fails *badly* here:
    >
    >http://www.google.com/groups?threadm=&selm=D87u12z90eq.fsf%40pobox.com
    >
    >
    >I've used a fair number of programming languages. Perl is the only
    >one I'd unhesitatingly call 'pathological'. And I do speak as an
    >admirer of the language: before Python was around and well-supported,
    >it served an important purpose. Now, though, it fills a much-needed
    >gap <wink>
    >
    >
    >John


    I'm going to complexify the story slightly: I'm unconvinced about
    the health of the SNMP facilities for Python and Ruby. On the other
    hand, VB's offerings in that category also didn't impress me in the
    past ...

    It's possible some or all of this has improved a lot in the last
    year. I personally wouldn't mind working with SNMP under Python,
    because I'm confident I can get it to do what I need. It might
    frustrate a newcomer, though ...

    Moreover, I perceive incoherence in the combination of 4., 6., 7.,
    and 10. When you talk about ".exe-s", I wonder what "cross-plat-
    form" means to you. Similarly, you really, *really* don't want to
    be thinking about USB and such; with any concern for cross-platform
    maintenance, you just want to read to and write from serial devices.

    My first instinct would be to choose Tcl. People are doing this
    sort of work happily with each of Perl, Python, Ruby, Tcl, and even
    other languages.
     
    Cameron Laird, Jul 21, 2004
    #9
  10. On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 03:07:21 +0900, you wrote:


    >My first instinct would be to choose Tcl.


    i don't think there's an easier way to write a gui app than tcl/tk.
    that was the main reason i chose it to write tkblog. i'm going to be
    porting it to ruby, and the only thing i haven't settled on is which
    ruby gui api to use...

    i was going to use wxruby, but that seems to be in a bit of a flux. i
    read recently that fxruby had a small(er) footprint, so i'm leaning in
    that direction

    > People are doing this
    >sort of work happily with each of Perl, Python, Ruby, Tcl, and even
    >other languages.


    like rebol and lua. rebol has a wicked learning curve, but the built
    in net protocols are very handy. it also has a the smallest footprint
    of any of the above mentioned languages


    http://home.cogeco.ca/~tsummerfelt1
     
    tony summerfelt, Jul 26, 2004
    #10
  11. On Monday, July 26, 2004, 10:07:48 AM, tony wrote:

    >>My first instinct would be to choose Tcl.


    > i don't think there's an easier way to write a gui app than tcl/tk.


    What about Ruby/Tk? How does that compare?

    Gavin
     
    Gavin Sinclair, Jul 26, 2004
    #11
  12. Dave Boland

    Tom Copeland Guest

    On Sun, 2004-07-25 at 20:07, tony summerfelt wrote:
    > like rebol and lua.


    Little known fact of the day - Lua has a LuaForge:

    http://luaforge.net/

    Good times!

    tom
     
    Tom Copeland, Jul 26, 2004
    #12
  13. If you are looking to stay close to VB, here are some to look at:

    http://hbasic.sourceforge.net/
    http://gambas.sourceforge.net/

    Or for something completely different:
    http://www.naken.cc/vb2c/

    http://www.gnome.org/projects/gb/
    Gnome basic, now dead. However, mbas, the Mono Basic *is* alive and well,
    and might be what you are looking for: http://www.go-mono.com/mbas.html
    (site not accessible at time of post).

    I may start a flame war with this, but from what I understand, VB is
    actually a distant descendant of Ruby. So, that might tell you something.

    j----- k-----

    Dave Boland wrote:

    > The other day I was asked if there is an open source replacement for VB6
    > that is cross-platform. I spent a little bit of time at Barnes-Noble
    > and looking at news groups, but don't have a good answer. Hope you can
    > help without geting into a language war. These will be for commercial
    > applications with a GUI.
    >
    > What they seem to be looking for is:
    > 1. High level language, but not necessarly VB compatible.
    > 2. OOP
    > 3. Reasonalble learning curve
    > 4. Cross-platform
    > 5. IDE and ability to graphically design windows.
    > 6. Distribute programs as .exe's, so some sort of compiler needed.
    > 7. Serial communications library (RS-232, 485, USB)
    > 8. SNMP library
    > 9. Good performance (not expected to be as fast as C/C++)
    > 10. Windows are native to each O.S.
    > 11. Database support of Access and MySQL
    >
    > It looks like any of the three languages have most or all of what they
    > need, but I don't use scripting languages enough to give a good answer.
    >
    > Dave,
     
    Joshua Kugler, Sep 11, 2004
    #13
  14. Dave Boland

    Lyle Johnson Guest

    On Sat, 11 Sep 2004 16:25:01 +0900, Joshua Kugler <> wrote:

    > I may start a flame war with this, but from what I understand, VB is
    > actually a distant descendant of Ruby. So, that might tell you something.


    Wrong, but no need for a flame war. ;)

    There was indeed a "Ruby" which was one of Alan Cooper's early
    prototypes for what became Visual Basic; but the Ruby programming
    language discussed on the ruby-talk mailing list is from a completely
    different bloodline.
     
    Lyle Johnson, Sep 11, 2004
    #14
  15. Lyle Johnson ha scritto:

    I guess you missed an implicit " ;) " :)
     
    gabriele renzi, Sep 11, 2004
    #15
  16. Dave Boland

    vruz Guest

    > Python (priceless ;-)

    For the rest, you have Ruby
     
    vruz, Sep 11, 2004
    #16
  17. Dave Boland

    vruz Guest

    > > Python (priceless ;-)

    oh, might I add...

    You've got the whole in your hands
    with the Ruby language in your hands
     
    vruz, Sep 11, 2004
    #17
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Dave Boland

    VB(ish) replacement

    Dave Boland, Jul 20, 2004, in forum: Perl
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    595
    Joshua Kugler
    Sep 11, 2004
  2. Gummy
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    387
    Gummy
    Mar 31, 2006
  3. joseph white

    1979-ish web site?

    joseph white, Dec 3, 2004, in forum: HTML
    Replies:
    89
    Views:
    2,123
  4. Jeffrey Silverman

    1979-ish web site?

    Jeffrey Silverman, Dec 6, 2004, in forum: HTML
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    429
    Toby Inkster
    Dec 7, 2004
  5. Dave Boland

    VB(ish) replacement

    Dave Boland, Jul 20, 2004, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    596
    Joshua Kugler
    Sep 11, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page