very Very VERY dumb Question About The new Set( ) 's

Discussion in 'Python' started by Raymond Arthur St. Marie II of III, Jul 23, 2003.

  1. very Very VERY dumb ? about the new Set( ) 's

    Please be kind and read this like you know I've been up 33-34 hours reading
    PEP's but...

    Doc\ref 2.6 Delimiters show's three unused characters "@ $ ?".
    @ sort of looks like and sort of sounds like a set an
    $ well sort of obvious.
    I can imagine that the $ would be confused for money and @ is ugly.

    You folks have prob'ly been all over this.
    Even thou I've been using Python since 1.4, I only joined the comp.lang.python
    a couple weeks ago so I don't know the flame wars over the Set implimentation.

    Ray St. Marie --- Afraid to sign his name to this one
    Raymond Arthur St. Marie II of III, Jul 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. Raymond Arthur St. Marie II of III

    Alan Gauld Guest

    On 23 Jul 2003 18:47:32 GMT, orespam (Raymond
    Arthur St. Marie II of III ) wrote:

    > Doc\ref 2.6 Delimiters show's three unused characters "@ $ ?".
    > @ sort of looks like and sort of sounds like a set an
    > $ well sort of obvious.
    > I can imagine that the $ would be confused for money and @ is ugly.


    Since I detest any thought of prefix symbols to indicate type(as
    per Perl etc) but have no visibility of these debates, I'll throw
    in my suggestion and done a flameproof suit!

    Since both dictionaries and Sets require unique members/keys,
    why not use the dictionary braces but without the key/value
    syntax. So:

    mySet = {1,2,3,4}

    Which is illegal for a dictionary but would be OK for a Set.
    It also just happens to be the same delimiters used in math
    for sets...

    Just a thought before I go to bed! :)

    Alan G.
    Author of the Learn to Program website
    http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/alan.gauld
    Alan Gauld, Jul 24, 2003
    #2
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  3. Raymond Arthur St. Marie II of III

    Carl Banks Guest

    Alan Gauld wrote:
    > On 23 Jul 2003 18:47:32 GMT, orespam (Raymond
    > Arthur St. Marie II of III ) wrote:
    >
    >> Doc\ref 2.6 Delimiters show's three unused characters "@ $ ?".
    >> @ sort of looks like and sort of sounds like a set an
    >> $ well sort of obvious.
    >> I can imagine that the $ would be confused for money and @ is ugly.

    >
    > Since I detest any thought of prefix symbols to indicate type(as
    > per Perl etc) but have no visibility of these debates, I'll throw
    > in my suggestion and done a flameproof suit!
    >
    > Since both dictionaries and Sets require unique members/keys,
    > why not use the dictionary braces but without the key/value
    > syntax. So:
    >
    > mySet = {1,2,3,4}
    >
    > Which is illegal for a dictionary but would be OK for a Set.
    > It also just happens to be the same delimiters used in math
    > for sets...
    >
    > Just a thought before I go to bed! :)



    +1 if Python's parser could handle it (which seems dubious).


    --
    CARL BANKS
    Carl Banks, Jul 25, 2003
    #3
  4. Raymond Arthur St. Marie II of III

    Inyeol Lee Guest

    On Thu, Jul 24, 2003 at 10:31:11PM +0000, Alan Gauld wrote:
    [...]
    > Since both dictionaries and Sets require unique members/keys,
    > why not use the dictionary braces but without the key/value
    > syntax. So:
    >
    > mySet = {1,2,3,4}
    >
    > Which is illegal for a dictionary but would be OK for a Set.
    > It also just happens to be the same delimiters used in math
    > for sets...


    See PEP 218. It describes a long term plan to make set builtin type,
    including syntax for constant set {1,2,3,4} and empty set {-}.

    Inyeol
    Inyeol Lee, Jul 25, 2003
    #4
  5. > > Since both dictionaries and Sets require unique members/keys,
    > > why not use the dictionary braces but without the key/value
    > > syntax. So:
    > >
    > > mySet = {1,2,3,4}
    > >
    > > Which is illegal for a dictionary but would be OK for a Set.
    > > It also just happens to be the same delimiters used in math
    > > for sets...


    >
    >
    > +1 if Python's parser could handle it (which seems dubious).



    FWIW, I think the easiest and most readable syntax is:

    mySet = set(1, 2, 3, 4)

    BTW, this is a bit reminiscent of the discussion about a syntax
    for entering fixed decimals. After much discussion, someone
    realized the obvious and noted that real programs mostly
    take in their fixed point data from external sources and would
    rarely appear as a constant in a program; hence, there was no
    need for a special syntax -- just Decimal(data) would do the
    trick. (Think about a program like Quicken for checkbook
    accounting -- none of the check/deposit amounts are known
    in advance so the program is unlikely to contain any fixed
    decimal constants except zero and $0.01).


    Raymond Hettinger
    Raymond Hettinger, Jul 27, 2003
    #5
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