VHDL Tutorials etc

Discussion in 'VHDL' started by Andy Evans, Dec 10, 2005.

  1. Andy Evans

    Andy Evans Guest

    Hi,

    I'm new to VHDL and would like some recommendations as to the best (free)
    web tutorials on the subject please.

    Also any book recommendations.

    Cheers,

    Andy.

    --
    PLEASE remove spam_off to reply
    Andy Evans, Dec 10, 2005
    #1
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  2. www.interfacebus.com, Dec 10, 2005
    #2
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  3. Andy Evans

    Andy Evans Guest

    Andy Evans, Dec 10, 2005
    #3
  4. Andy Evans

    Marc Guest

    go to Doulos website:
    http://www.doulos.com/knowhow/vhdl_designers_guide/

    Lots of fun !
    Marc

    "Andy Evans" <_offfreeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dnfe62$pfc$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm new to VHDL and would like some recommendations as to the best (free)
    > web tutorials on the subject please.
    >
    > Also any book recommendations.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Andy.
    >
    > --
    > PLEASE remove spam_off to reply
    >
    >
    Marc, Dec 11, 2005
    #4
  5. Andy Evans

    Andy Evans Guest

    Marc,

    That looks good. Thanks.

    Andy.

    --
    PLEASE remove spam_off to reply
    "Marc" <> wrote in message
    news:439c6cf4$0$6539$...
    > go to Doulos website:
    > http://www.doulos.com/knowhow/vhdl_designers_guide/
    >
    > Lots of fun !
    > Marc
    >
    > "Andy Evans" <_offfreeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:dnfe62$pfc$...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I'm new to VHDL and would like some recommendations as to the best

    (free)
    > > web tutorials on the subject please.
    > >
    > > Also any book recommendations.
    > >
    > > Cheers,
    > >
    > > Andy.
    > >
    > > --
    > > PLEASE remove spam_off to reply
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    Andy Evans, Dec 11, 2005
    #5
  6. Andy Evans

    krby_xtrm Guest

    Try "VHDL Cookbook" , Google
    krby_xtrm, Dec 12, 2005
    #6
  7. krby_xtrm wrote:
    > Try "VHDL Cookbook" , Google



    I would not recommend Ashendens VHDL Cookbook for beginners, because
    there are several traps and pitfalls in it, as I have already stated in
    <http://groups.google.de/group/comp.lang.vhdl/browse_frm/thread/52e0388514495416/7a161bd3f6569328?lnk=st&q=Ralf+Hildebrandt+VHDL+Cookbook+Ashenden&rnum=1#7a161bd3f6569328>.

    Ralf
    Ralf Hildebrandt, Dec 12, 2005
    #7
  8. Ralf Hildebrandt wrote:
    > krby_xtrm wrote:
    >
    >> Try "VHDL Cookbook" , Google

    >
    > I would not recommend Ashendens VHDL Cookbook for beginners, because
    > there are several traps and pitfalls in it, as I have already stated in
    > <http://groups.google.de/group/comp.lang.vhdl/browse_frm/thread/52e0388514495416/7a161bd3f6569328?lnk=st&q=Ralf+Hildebrandt+VHDL+Cookbook+Ashenden&rnum=1#7a161bd3f6569328>.
    >
    >
    > Ralf


    Hi!

    I know it is not a very kind attitude of a first-poster to
    criticize sy :), but I will do that.
    My first VHLD book was Ashenden, and I had no problem with
    it. It describes the concept of the language -- and let's be
    honest, VHDL is far more than a language for synthesis. It
    is a complete HDL. I agree -- it is not a tutorial for
    writing synthesizable code. Because synthesis tools speak
    some odd derivates of VHDL.
    VHDL is a *language*. What you say is not always useable. I
    guess linguists have a term for it -- I do not remember it
    anymore. You do not have to stick to Ashenden after you have
    understood the concepts. I left it, and now I use 1076a.
    If somebody wants to learn VHDL we should encourage him/her
    to *understand* the language and should not train him to be
    a kind of script kiddy.

    Vitya
    Balogh Viktor, Dec 12, 2005
    #8
  9. Balogh Viktor wrote:


    >> I would not recommend Ashendens VHDL Cookbook for beginners

    ....
    > My first VHLD book was Ashenden, and I had no problem with it.


    The Cookbook or another book?

    > It
    > describes the concept of the language -- and let's be honest, VHDL is
    > far more than a language for synthesis. It is a complete HDL. I agree --
    > it is not a tutorial for writing synthesizable code. Because synthesis
    > tools speak some odd derivates of VHDL.
    > VHDL is a *language*. What you say is not always useable. I guess
    > linguists have a term for it -- I do not remember it anymore. You do not
    > have to stick to Ashenden after you have understood the concepts. I left
    > it, and now I use 1076a.
    > If somebody wants to learn VHDL we should encourage him/her to
    > *understand* the language and should not train him to be a kind of
    > script kiddy.


    Well, for me the it is far more useful to learn first the synthesizable
    subset of a HDL and then go deeper into the language. This might be,
    because I aim for synthesizable code. Writing it in a very good style
    comes second - together with writing efficient testbenches. Simple, but
    very effective testbenches can be done also with the synthesizable
    subset of a HDL.
    I would go so far, that: "If beginners would learn the three basic
    elements of hardware (flipflop, latch, comb. logic) and the ideas to use
    them (e.g. state machines), a lot of questions here in the newsgroup
    would disappear." For myself I have to say, that I asked the same
    questions, when I was a beginner - because no one guided me to "coding
    styles for synthesizable code".

    Ralf
    Ralf Hildebrandt, Dec 12, 2005
    #9
  10. Andy Evans

    David Binnie Guest

    check out: http://www.vahana.com/examples.htm


    "Andy Evans" <_offfreeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:dnfe62$pfc$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm new to VHDL and would like some recommendations as to the best (free)
    > web tutorials on the subject please.
    >
    > Also any book recommendations.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Andy.
    >
    > --
    > PLEASE remove spam_off to reply
    >
    >
    David Binnie, Dec 12, 2005
    #10
  11. Andy Evans

    krby_xtrm Guest

    You might also want to try Active HDL Tutorial, not only will you get
    Lessons but a Free Demo of their HDL tools.
    krby_xtrm, Dec 13, 2005
    #11
  12. Andy Evans

    MB Guest

    On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 21:08:19 +0100, Ralf Hildebrandt
    <> wrote:

    >Balogh Viktor wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> I would not recommend Ashendens VHDL Cookbook for beginners

    >...
    >> My first VHLD book was Ashenden, and I had no problem with it.

    >
    >The Cookbook or another book?
    >
    >> It
    >> describes the concept of the language -- and let's be honest, VHDL is
    >> far more than a language for synthesis. It is a complete HDL. I agree --
    >> it is not a tutorial for writing synthesizable code. Because synthesis
    >> tools speak some odd derivates of VHDL.
    >> VHDL is a *language*. What you say is not always useable. I guess
    >> linguists have a term for it -- I do not remember it anymore. You do not
    >> have to stick to Ashenden after you have understood the concepts. I left
    >> it, and now I use 1076a.
    >> If somebody wants to learn VHDL we should encourage him/her to
    >> *understand* the language and should not train him to be a kind of
    >> script kiddy.

    >
    >Well, for me the it is far more useful to learn first the synthesizable
    >subset of a HDL and then go deeper into the language. This might be,
    >because I aim for synthesizable code. Writing it in a very good style
    >comes second - together with writing efficient testbenches. Simple, but
    >very effective testbenches can be done also with the synthesizable
    >subset of a HDL.
    >I would go so far, that: "If beginners would learn the three basic
    >elements of hardware (flipflop, latch, comb. logic) and the ideas to use
    >them (e.g. state machines), a lot of questions here in the newsgroup
    >would disappear." For myself I have to say, that I asked the same
    >questions, when I was a beginner - because no one guided me to "coding
    >styles for synthesizable code".
    >
    >Ralf


    That said (and I agree) what first book would you recommend Ralf?
    Martin
    MB, Dec 15, 2005
    #12
  13. MB wrote:


    > That said (and I agree) what first book would you recommend Ralf?


    Douglas J. Smith: HDL Chip Design was very helpful to me - 1st, when I
    was learning VHDL, and 2nd when I had to do a project in Verilog later.
    It is not a "perfect" book, but nice to read with helpful examples.

    For text I/O for testbench purpose I could provide some more examples,
    but the book provides enough to learn the basic stuff.
    And for synthesizable design I would add a chapter about the three basic
    things you need in a HDL: flipflops, combinational logic and latches. It
    is helpful to repeat, that all other stuff bases on only these 3 things.

    HDL Chip Design explains VHDL and Verilog by examples. If you are an
    advanced user, that wants to know all the other language contructs,
    Ashendens VHDL Cookbook may be an option. Unfortunately he uses the
    bit(_vector) for all examples and his big CPU example is only a
    simulation model and very far away from beeing synthesizable.

    Ralf
    Ralf Hildebrandt, Dec 16, 2005
    #13
  14. Andy Evans

    David Binnie Guest

    The best book by far in this context

    Circuit Design with VHDL Volnei A. Pedroni
    David Binnie, Dec 17, 2005
    #14
  15. Andy Evans

    krby_xtrm Guest

    Yes I agree with that, it presents code very well, explains it with
    detail, but most of all it gives notes on different implementations.
    Presents simulations which are very helpful indeed.

    A must have for every VHDL developer!
    <Circuit Design with VHDL Volnei A. Pedroni>
    krby_xtrm, Dec 17, 2005
    #15
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