visibility vs display

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Michael Laplante, May 4, 2006.

  1. visibility:hidden versus display:none.

    What are the differences and when would you use one over the other?

    M
     
    Michael Laplante, May 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. Michael Laplante wrote:
    > visibility:hidden versus display:none.
    >
    > What are the differences and when would you use one over the other?


    Try them and see. "visibility" simply hides content, "display" also
    removes it from the flow.


    --
    Hywel
    http://kibo.org.uk/
     
    Hywel Jenkins, May 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. Michael Laplante

    ironcorona Guest

    Michael Laplante wrote:
    > visibility:hidden versus display:none.
    >
    > What are the differences and when would you use one over the other?


    visibility:hidden means that the element is still there and taking up
    space on the screen but just can't be seen. (the space taken up by the
    content is just a white box).

    display:none means that the content is taken out of the flow of the page
    altogether. (it may as well not be there in the first place).

    As to when you would use one over the other:
    When ever you consider appropriate I guess
    :)


    --
    ironcorona
     
    ironcorona, May 4, 2006
    #3
  4. Michael Laplante

    Andy Dingley Guest

    Michael Laplante wrote:
    > visibility:hidden versus display:none.
    >
    > What are the differences and when would you use one over the other?


    It's the difference between [visibility] painting one out (but it still
    leaving a hole behind) and [display] vanishing altogether as if it had
    never been there, with the other elements flowing around into its
    space.

    Generally use display:none;

    If you want to make a "menu button" vanish, but without disturbing the
    rest of a toolbar, then use visibility.
     
    Andy Dingley, May 4, 2006
    #4
  5. Michael Laplante

    dorayme Guest

    In article <445a29f6$>,
    ironcorona <> wrote:

    > display:none means that the content is taken out of the flow of the page
    > altogether. (it may as well not be there in the first place).


    Experienced folk can still feel its presence (or absence?)...

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, May 5, 2006
    #5
  6. Michael Laplante

    ironcorona Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > In article <445a29f6$>,
    > ironcorona <> wrote:
    >
    >> display:none means that the content is taken out of the flow of the page
    >> altogether. (it may as well not be there in the first place).

    >
    > Experienced folk can still feel its presence (or absence?)...


    Like the way one can feel the presence of the previous occupant when one
    goes to the toilet and the seat's warm.
    :)

    --
    ironcorona
     
    ironcorona, May 5, 2006
    #6
  7. Michael Laplante

    dorayme Guest

    In article <445ad75c$>,
    ironcorona <> wrote:

    > dorayme wrote:
    > > In article <445a29f6$>,
    > > ironcorona <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> display:none means that the content is taken out of the flow of the page
    > >> altogether. (it may as well not be there in the first place).

    > >
    > > Experienced folk can still feel its presence (or absence?)...

    >
    > Like the way one can feel the presence of the previous occupant when one
    > goes to the toilet and the seat's warm.
    > :)


    No, it is more like knowing something has changed but not knowing
    quite what when one walks into a room where the clock stopped
    ticking a while back...

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, May 5, 2006
    #7
  8. Michael Laplante

    ironcorona Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > In article <445ad75c$>,
    > ironcorona <> wrote:
    >
    >> dorayme wrote:
    >>> In article <445a29f6$>,
    >>> ironcorona <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> display:none means that the content is taken out of the flow of the page
    >>>> altogether. (it may as well not be there in the first place).
    >>> Experienced folk can still feel its presence (or absence?)...

    >> Like the way one can feel the presence of the previous occupant when one
    >> goes to the toilet and the seat's warm.
    >> :)

    >
    > No, it is more like knowing something has changed but not knowing
    > quite what when one walks into a room where the clock stopped
    > ticking a while back...


    Similar in many ways to the inference that Santa has been, when one
    finds cookie crumbs and an glass of milk under the tree.


    --
    ironcorona
     
    ironcorona, May 5, 2006
    #8
  9. Michael Laplante

    dorayme Guest

    In article <445b82fa$>,
    ironcorona <> wrote:

    > dorayme wrote:
    > > In article <445ad75c$>,
    > > ironcorona <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> dorayme wrote:
    > >>> In article <445a29f6$>,
    > >>> ironcorona <> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> display:none means that the content is taken out of the flow of the page
    > >>>> altogether. (it may as well not be there in the first place).
    > >>> Experienced folk can still feel its presence (or absence?)...
    > >> Like the way one can feel the presence of the previous occupant when one
    > >> goes to the toilet and the seat's warm.
    > >> :)

    > >
    > > No, it is more like knowing something has changed but not knowing
    > > quite what when one walks into a room where the clock stopped
    > > ticking a while back...

    >
    > Similar in many ways to the inference that Santa has been, when one
    > finds cookie crumbs and an glass of milk under the tree.


    Again, no. Your cases are of actual physical things. It is the
    absence of them that is important.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, May 6, 2006
    #9
  10. Michael Laplante

    ironcorona Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > In article <445b82fa$>,
    > ironcorona <> wrote:
    >
    >> dorayme wrote:
    >>> In article <445ad75c$>,
    >>> ironcorona <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> dorayme wrote:
    >>>>> In article <445a29f6$>,
    >>>>> ironcorona <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> display:none means that the content is taken out of the flow of the page
    >>>>>> altogether. (it may as well not be there in the first place).
    >>>>> Experienced folk can still feel its presence (or absence?)...
    >>>> Like the way one can feel the presence of the previous occupant when one
    >>>> goes to the toilet and the seat's warm.
    >>>> :)
    >>> No, it is more like knowing something has changed but not knowing
    >>> quite what when one walks into a room where the clock stopped
    >>> ticking a while back...

    >> Similar in many ways to the inference that Santa has been, when one
    >> finds cookie crumbs and an glass of milk under the tree.

    >
    > Again, no. Your cases are of actual physical things. It is the
    > absence of them that is important.


    Oh I see what you're getting at. Though I'm not entirely sure that
    Santa counts as an actual physical thing :)

    --
    ironcorona
     
    ironcorona, May 6, 2006
    #10
  11. Michael Laplante

    dorayme Guest

    In article <445ca5a1$>,
    ironcorona <> wrote:

    > dorayme wrote:


    > >>> No, it is more like knowing something has changed but not knowing
    > >>> quite what when one walks into a room where the clock stopped
    > >>> ticking a while back...
    > >> Similar in many ways to the inference that Santa has been, when one
    > >> finds cookie crumbs and an glass of milk under the tree.

    > >
    > > Again, no. Your cases are of actual physical things. It is the
    > > absence of them that is important.

    >
    > Oh I see what you're getting at. Though I'm not entirely sure that
    > Santa counts as an actual physical thing :)


    <g> ... but breadcrumbs and glasses and milk are, no?

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, May 7, 2006
    #11
  12. Michael Laplante

    ironcorona Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > In article <445ca5a1$>,
    > ironcorona <> wrote:
    >
    >> dorayme wrote:

    >
    >>>>> No, it is more like knowing something has changed but not knowing
    >>>>> quite what when one walks into a room where the clock stopped
    >>>>> ticking a while back...
    >>>> Similar in many ways to the inference that Santa has been, when one
    >>>> finds cookie crumbs and an glass of milk under the tree.
    >>> Again, no. Your cases are of actual physical things. It is the
    >>> absence of them that is important.

    >> Oh I see what you're getting at. Though I'm not entirely sure that
    >> Santa counts as an actual physical thing :)


    Knowing that last night you said something stupid to someone but not
    remembering what due to one to many Long Island Ice Teas?

    --
    ironcorona
     
    ironcorona, May 7, 2006
    #12
  13. Michael Laplante

    Mark Parnell Guest

    Deciding to do something for the good of humanity, dorayme
    <> declared in alt.html:
    > In article <445b82fa$>,
    > ironcorona <> wrote:
    >
    >> Similar in many ways to the inference that Santa has been, when one
    >> finds cookie crumbs and an glass of milk under the tree.

    >
    > Again, no. Your cases are of actual physical things. It is the
    > absence of them that is important.


    OK, so it's the absence of the cookies and milk that you left there the
    night before that tells you Santa has been.

    Of course, you could blame your cat.

    --
    Mark Parnell
    My Usenet is improved; yours could be too:
    http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
     
    Mark Parnell, May 9, 2006
    #13
  14. Michael Laplante

    ironcorona Guest

    Mark Parnell wrote:
    > Deciding to do something for the good of humanity, dorayme
    > <> declared in alt.html:
    >> In article <445b82fa$>,
    >> ironcorona <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Similar in many ways to the inference that Santa has been, when one
    >>> finds cookie crumbs and an glass of milk under the tree.

    >> Again, no. Your cases are of actual physical things. It is the
    >> absence of them that is important.

    >
    > OK, so it's the absence of the cookies and milk that you left there the
    > night before that tells you Santa has been.
    >
    > Of course, you could blame your cat.


    Except your cat's been missing for the last six months. So perhaps it's
    the absence of your cat that tells you Santa has been.


    --
    Brian O'Connor (ironcorona)
     
    ironcorona, May 9, 2006
    #14
  15. Michael Laplante

    dorayme Guest

    In article <4460b208$>,
    ironcorona <> wrote:

    > Mark Parnell wrote:
    > > Deciding to do something for the good of humanity, dorayme
    > > <> declared in alt.html:
    > >> In article <445b82fa$>,
    > >> ironcorona <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Similar in many ways to the inference that Santa has been, when one
    > >>> finds cookie crumbs and an glass of milk under the tree.
    > >> Again, no. Your cases are of actual physical things. It is the
    > >> absence of them that is important.

    > >
    > > OK, so it's the absence of the cookies and milk that you left there the
    > > night before that tells you Santa has been.
    > >
    > > Of course, you could blame your cat.

    >
    > Except your cat's been missing for the last six months. So perhaps it's
    > the absence of your cat that tells you Santa has been.


    Please! If you are going to do nonsense, you must be sensible
    about it. We are talking noticing things on the spot, short term.
    Throwing in a 6 month gap is unacceptable babbling.

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, May 10, 2006
    #15
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