Web functions idea

Discussion in 'Python' started by Mark Carter, Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Mark Carter

    Mark Carter Guest

    I was musing recently about how one could, for example, set up a really
    simple mailing subscription list. It occurred to me that a really simple
    way to implement it would be to use xmlrpc.
    So there could be a function
    subscribe(emailAddress),
    which would send an email for confirmation, and another function
    confirm(emailAddress, password)
    which would confirm the address ... and so on.

    Now, the problem is that, if you use xmlrpc, it requires some kind of
    fiddly software that the client would have to install. What you would
    really want is some kind of web interface instead of xmlrpc - a kind of
    "web driven xmlrpc" (that would eliminate the need of an actual xmlrpc
    server).

    The point of it being this: a developer would just write the functions
    that he needed, a la xmlrpc, which would be "exposed" to this new module
    (let's call it webrpc) - and webrpc would examine the function, work out
    how many arguments it had, and display a form for the user to fill out.
    From an application writer's point-of-view, it abstracts away the whole
    web process, leaving him free to just concentrate on the underlying
    function implementation.
     
    Mark Carter, Nov 29, 2005
    #1
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  2. Mark Carter wrote:
    > I was musing recently about how one could, for example, set up a really
    > simple mailing subscription list. It occurred to me that a really simple
    > way to implement it would be to use xmlrpc.
    > So there could be a function
    > subscribe(emailAddress),
    > which would send an email for confirmation, and another function
    > confirm(emailAddress, password)
    > which would confirm the address ... and so on.
    >
    > Now, the problem is that, if you use xmlrpc, it requires some kind of
    > fiddly software that the client would have to install. What you would
    > really want is some kind of web interface instead of xmlrpc - a kind of
    > "web driven xmlrpc" (that would eliminate the need of an actual xmlrpc
    > server).


    Congratulations, you've just rediscovered REST !-)

    > The point of it being this: a developer would just write the functions
    > that he needed, a la xmlrpc, which would be "exposed" to this new module
    > (let's call it webrpc) - and webrpc would examine the function, work out
    > how many arguments it had, and display a form for the user to fill out.
    > From an application writer's point-of-view, it abstracts away the whole
    > web process,


    I'm afraid doing web developpement without a minimal knowledge of "the
    whole web process" is somewhat unrealistic.

    > leaving him free to just concentrate on the underlying
    > function implementation.


    Turbogears is probably what you're looking for (if not quite what you
    describe).

    --
    bruno desthuilliers
    python -c "print '@'.join(['.'.join([w[::-1] for w in p.split('.')]) for
    p in ''.split('@')])"
     
    bruno at modulix, Nov 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. Mark Carter

    Mark Carter Guest

    bruno at modulix wrote:
    > Mark Carter wrote:


    > Congratulations, you've just rediscovered REST !-)


    Huzzah!

    > Turbogears is probably what you're looking for (if not quite what you
    > describe).


    Thanks. It looks quite interesting.
     
    Mark Carter, Nov 29, 2005
    #3
  4. Mark Carter

    Larry Bates Guest

    The client software can be written in JavaScript that makes
    xmlrpc calls to the server (AJAX). That way there is no
    installation required.

    But there are loads of free, debugged mailing list programs
    out there that use email as the interface. You should take
    a look there first.

    -Larry Bates

    Mark Carter wrote:
    > I was musing recently about how one could, for example, set up a really
    > simple mailing subscription list. It occurred to me that a really simple
    > way to implement it would be to use xmlrpc.
    > So there could be a function
    > subscribe(emailAddress),
    > which would send an email for confirmation, and another function
    > confirm(emailAddress, password)
    > which would confirm the address ... and so on.
    >
    > Now, the problem is that, if you use xmlrpc, it requires some kind of
    > fiddly software that the client would have to install. What you would
    > really want is some kind of web interface instead of xmlrpc - a kind of
    > "web driven xmlrpc" (that would eliminate the need of an actual xmlrpc
    > server).
    >
    > The point of it being this: a developer would just write the functions
    > that he needed, a la xmlrpc, which would be "exposed" to this new module
    > (let's call it webrpc) - and webrpc would examine the function, work out
    > how many arguments it had, and display a form for the user to fill out.
    > From an application writer's point-of-view, it abstracts away the whole
    > web process, leaving him free to just concentrate on the underlying
    > function implementation.
     
    Larry Bates, Nov 29, 2005
    #4
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