Webservice suggestions

Discussion in 'ASP .Net Web Services' started by Sean-usenet, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. Sean-usenet

    Sean-usenet Guest

    Hello everyone

    I am brand-new to webservices, but do have programming experience. I
    created a webservice that looks up the current lottery Jackpot amounts
    for several lottery games. I was hoping some of you experts could
    take a look at the webservices and make sure everything is looking
    like a webservice should.

    http://www.musl.com/webservices/gameinfo.asmx

    A lot of extra stuff appears when a webservice is invoked, i am not
    sure if that stuff needs to be removed somehow or if it is good to
    have for some reason. In my vb.net code, the webservice is returning
    a DataSet.

    Any feedback at all is greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
    Sean
     
    Sean-usenet, Mar 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. "Sean-usenet" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello everyone
    >
    > I am brand-new to webservices, but do have programming experience. I
    > created a webservice that looks up the current lottery Jackpot amounts
    > for several lottery games. I was hoping some of you experts could
    > take a look at the webservices and make sure everything is looking
    > like a webservice should.
    >
    > http://www.musl.com/webservices/gameinfo.asmx
    >
    > A lot of extra stuff appears when a webservice is invoked, i am not
    > sure if that stuff needs to be removed somehow or if it is good to
    > have for some reason. In my vb.net code, the webservice is returning
    > a DataSet.
    >
    > Any feedback at all is greatly appreciated!


    If you're brand new to web services, then don't remove anything. You do not
    have the experience necessary to decide what to remove.

    Besides, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

    John
     
    John Saunders, Mar 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. Sean-usenet

    Sean-usenet Guest

    Thanks for the reply John. I do want to learn more about webservices,
    that is why i posted the link to my webservice. How do the results of
    the Invoke look? Is it recommended to have all the schema information
    returned, or should I remove that since my webservice is so basic?

    I'm looking for feedback, help me learn :)

    Sean
    On Mar 5, 12:43 pm, "John Saunders" <john.saunders at trizetto.com>
    wrote:
    >
    > If you're brand new to web services, then don't remove anything. You do not
    > have the experience necessary to decide what to remove.
    >
    > Besides, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
    >
    > John
     
    Sean-usenet, Mar 5, 2007
    #3
  4. "Sean-usenet" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the reply John. I do want to learn more about webservices,
    > that is why i posted the link to my webservice. How do the results of
    > the Invoke look? Is it recommended to have all the schema information
    > returned, or should I remove that since my webservice is so basic?
    >
    > I'm looking for feedback, help me learn :)


    Then learn an extremely valuable lesson: don't touch code for no reason. You
    have not expressed any reason to remove anything. If there is no such
    reason, then don't do it!

    Very often I'm asked, "what's the best/fastest/best designed way to do x".
    My answer is "do it so that it works, then get to work on the next thing".
    If it is too slow, that would be a reason to change things. If it needs to
    change because it needs to be more general, then that might be a reason to
    apply a Design Pattern. If it turns out that it doesn't really work, then
    that would be the best reason of all to change things.

    But if none of the above apply, then there is usually more code to write,
    and you'd be better off spending your time on the other code until a better
    reason arises.

    John

    P.S. When I say "works", I mean that, ideally, all of its automated unit
    tests should pass. A good set of automated tests will give you a real,
    executable definition of "it works". This is very useful when you go to
    improve the performance or the design. It allows you to say, "I improved the
    performance/design" and still, "it works".
     
    John Saunders, Mar 5, 2007
    #4
  5. Sean-usenet

    Sean-usenet Guest

    Well, I wrote this webservice as a learning experience not for a
    production need. So, while I understand your logic of "get it working
    and go on to the next project" - it doesn't really apply to this. The
    whole goal of this was to start learning how to build good webservices
    that follow accepted practices. I made this one as well as I could
    from my own reading and research, now I am hoping that someone familar
    with using webservices can take a look at it and give me some
    suggestions.


    On Mar 5, 3:13 pm, "John Saunders" <john.saunders at trizetto.com>
    wrote:
    >
    > Then learn an extremely valuable lesson: don't touch code for no reason. You
    > have not expressed any reason to remove anything. If there is no such
    > reason, then don't do it!
    >
    > Very often I'm asked, "what's the best/fastest/best designed way to do x".
    > My answer is "do it so that it works, then get to work on the next thing".
    > If it is too slow, that would be a reason to change things. If it needs to
    > change because it needs to be more general, then that might be a reason to
    > apply a Design Pattern. If it turns out that it doesn't really work, then
    > that would be the best reason of all to change things.
    >
    > But if none of the above apply, then there is usually more code to write,
    > and you'd be better off spending your time on the other code until a better
    > reason arises.
    >
    > John
    >
    > P.S. When I say "works", I mean that, ideally, all of its automated unit
    > tests should pass. A good set of automated tests will give you a real,
    > executable definition of "it works". This is very useful when you go to
    > improve the performance or the design. It allows you to say, "I improved the
    > performance/design" and still, "it works".
     
    Sean-usenet, Mar 5, 2007
    #5
  6. "Sean-usenet" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Well, I wrote this webservice as a learning experience not for a
    > production need. So, while I understand your logic of "get it working
    > and go on to the next project" - it doesn't really apply to this. The
    > whole goal of this was to start learning how to build good webservices
    > that follow accepted practices. I made this one as well as I could
    > from my own reading and research, now I am hoping that someone familar
    > with using webservices can take a look at it and give me some
    > suggestions.


    Sorry, but that person won't be me. I don't have time for that. I'm working
    on the next project, and the one after that, and the one after that!

    John
     
    John Saunders, Mar 5, 2007
    #6
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