weird white (orange) spaces

Discussion in 'HTML' started by julian_m, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. julian_m

    julian_m Guest

    I made a small example which shows a problem that I'm having with IE

    Where does those orange spaces come from????

    http://www.msys.com.ar/index0324.php

    Note (only visible with msIE )

    regards - jm
     
    julian_m, Mar 25, 2006
    #1
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  2. julian_m

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <>,
    "julian_m" <> wrote:

    > I made a small example which shows a problem that I'm having with IE
    >
    > Where does those orange spaces come from????
    >
    > http://www.msys.com.ar/index0324.php
    >
    > Note (only visible with msIE )
    >
    > regards - jm


    Well, you must know you have orange in the background for things
    from your css, take a look. When your "background: orange;" is
    removed, the orange goes. As to why only in IE, you may need to
    set margins and paddings to 0 or something like this, I am not
    sure and work on a Mac....

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Mar 25, 2006
    #2
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  3. julian_m

    julian_m Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > In article
    > <>,
    > "julian_m" <> wrote:
    >
    > > I made a small example which shows a problem that I'm having with IE
    > >
    > > Where does those orange spaces come from????
    > >
    > > http://www.msys.com.ar/index0324.php
    > >
    > > Note (only visible with msIE )
    > >
    > > regards - jm

    >
    > Well, you must know you have orange in the background for things
    > from your css, take a look.


    Yes, It is intetionally to see the problem clear, note that in the
    subject itself, I put "orange".
    The problem is about weird spaces which aren't visible on ff, opera and
    safari (as you told me before, I think you did)


    > As to why only in IE, you may need to
    > set margins and paddings to 0 or something like this,


    That's the key, but I'm unable to fix it. I tried a lot of
    combinations. That's why I'm here, you know...

    regards - jm
     
    julian_m, Mar 25, 2006
    #3
  4. julian_m wrote:

    > Yes, It is intetionally to see the problem clear, note that in the
    > subject itself, I put "orange".


    The name orange is an unfortunate choice, since it is not a defined name
    by CSS 1.0 and CSS 2.0 specifications, so a standards-conforming browser
    would ignore. In practice, there is no such browser, but still.

    > The problem is about weird spaces which aren't visible on ff, opera and
    > safari (as you told me before, I think you did)


    On IE 7 beta 2 preview, I see the orange squares, then they are replaced
    by the rounded corners. The CSS code looks complicated, so I'm not sure
    what's going on, but quite understandably it may take a little time
    before the images are loaded.
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Mar 25, 2006
    #4
  5. julian_m

    kchayka Guest

    Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    >
    > The name orange is an unfortunate choice, since it is not a defined name
    > by CSS 1.0 and CSS 2.0 specifications,


    It is, however, one of the well-established X11 color names, which are
    supported by many browsers, even Netscape 4.x.

    IIRC, X11 color names are included in the CSS 3 spec.

    --
    Reply email address is a bottomless spam bucket.
    Please reply to the group so everyone can share.
     
    kchayka, Mar 25, 2006
    #5
  6. On Sat, 25 Mar 2006, kchayka wrote:

    > Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    > >
    > > The name orange is an unfortunate choice, since it is not a
    > > defined name by CSS 1.0 and CSS 2.0 specifications,

    >
    > It is, however, one of the well-established X11 color names, which
    > are supported by many browsers, even Netscape 4.x.


    That's as may be, but Jukka's advice is good: a browser has every
    right to ignore it, supported by the CSS recommendations on error
    handling.

    > IIRC, X11 color names are included in the CSS 3 spec.


    It's about compatibility. Be conservative in what you offer, and
    liberal in what you accept. In CSS terms, that means CSS authors
    should not offer newly-defined stuff unless willing to cope with the
    consequences of it being ignored, whereas developers of software
    should implement newly-defined stuff as soon as possible, while still
    following the CSS mandates and guidelines about ignoring stuff that
    they don't understand (i.e DON'T try to guess what the author might
    have meant, as the consequences can be disastrous).
     
    Alan J. Flavell, Mar 25, 2006
    #6
  7. julian_m

    kchayka Guest

    julian_m wrote:
    >
    > Where does those orange spaces come from????
    >
    > http://www.msys.com.ar/index0324.php
    >
    > Note (only visible with msIE )


    Your CSS does seem overly complicated. Why not try some templates that
    are already well-tested? You can at least use them as an educational
    tool to see how you might improve (and simplify) your own version.
    <URL:http://css-discuss.incutio.com/?page=RoundedCorners>

    --
    Reply email address is a bottomless spam bucket.
    Please reply to the group so everyone can share.
     
    kchayka, Mar 25, 2006
    #7
  8. julian_m

    Neredbojias Guest

    With neither quill nor qualm, Alan J. Flavell quothed:

    > On Sat, 25 Mar 2006, kchayka wrote:
    >
    > > Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
    > > >
    > > > The name orange is an unfortunate choice, since it is not a
    > > > defined name by CSS 1.0 and CSS 2.0 specifications,

    > >
    > > It is, however, one of the well-established X11 color names, which
    > > are supported by many browsers, even Netscape 4.x.

    >
    > That's as may be, but Jukka's advice is good: a browser has every
    > right to ignore it, supported by the CSS recommendations on error
    > handling.
    >
    > > IIRC, X11 color names are included in the CSS 3 spec.

    >
    > It's about compatibility. Be conservative in what you offer, and
    > liberal in what you accept. In CSS terms, that means CSS authors
    > should not offer newly-defined stuff unless willing to cope with the
    > consequences of it being ignored, whereas developers of software
    > should implement newly-defined stuff as soon as possible, while still
    > following the CSS mandates and guidelines about ignoring stuff that
    > they don't understand (i.e DON'T try to guess what the author might
    > have meant, as the consequences can be disastrous).


    I was playing around with something like this the other day:

    <a href="hula.mp3" type="audio/x-mpegurl">A Hip Song</a>

    ....in an attempt to avoid using .m3u redirection files. IE6 seemed to
    try to open it as an image file in a new window! (FWIW, it worked in
    Gecko and Opera offered a disappointing Open/Save dialog.)

    --
    Neredbojias
    Contrary to popular belief, it is believable.
     
    Neredbojias, Mar 25, 2006
    #8
  9. julian_m

    julian_m Guest

    kchayka wrote:
    > julian_m wrote:
    > >
    > > Where does those orange spaces come from????
    > >
    > > http://www.msys.com.ar/index0324.php
    > >
    > > Note (only visible with msIE )

    >
    > Your CSS does seem overly complicated. Why not try some templates that
    > are already well-tested? You can at least use them as an educational
    > tool to see how you might improve (and simplify) your own version.
    > <URL:http://css-discuss.incutio.com/?page=RoundedCorners>


    Great link.
    I'm making an even smaller example than I posted yesterday. I can't
    believe that nobody here can fix it. It is very disappointing all the
    issues regard compabilities among browsers. isn't it?

    regards - jm
     
    julian_m, Mar 25, 2006
    #9
  10. julian_m

    kchayka Guest

    Alan J. Flavell wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Mar 2006, kchayka wrote:
    >
    >> IIRC, X11 color names are included in the CSS 3 spec.

    >
    > CSS authors
    > should not offer newly-defined stuff unless willing to cope with the
    > consequences of it being ignored,


    I totally agree. I just mentioned the X11 colors because they've been
    around and fairly well supported for eons, even if they haven't been
    official.

    Frankly, I don't know why people want to use names in the first place,
    especially if they're doing any graphics as part of the design or
    looking for appropriate complementary colors. Numeric values are the
    only way to go, AFAIC.

    --
    Reply email address is a bottomless spam bucket.
    Please reply to the group so everyone can share.
     
    kchayka, Mar 25, 2006
    #10
  11. julian_m

    kchayka Guest

    julian_m wrote:
    >> >
    >> > http://www.msys.com.ar/index0324.php

    >
    > I can't believe that nobody here can fix it.


    I don't think the issue is that nobody here *can* fix it, but that
    nobody wants to try to make your particular CSS work. Your code was
    unnecessarily complex. I didn't think it was worth trying to fix.

    I could easily have rewritten the code for you, but I hate spoon-feeding
    anyone. :) You will learn more by studying different examples and
    experimenting yourself, anyway. The link I posted will get you started.

    --
    Reply email address is a bottomless spam bucket.
    Please reply to the group so everyone can share.
     
    kchayka, Mar 25, 2006
    #11
  12. julian_m

    julian_m Guest

    kchayka wrote:
    > julian_m wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> > http://www.msys.com.ar/index0324.php

    > >
    > > I can't believe that nobody here can fix it.

    >
    > I don't think the issue is that nobody here *can* fix it, but that
    > nobody wants to try to make your particular CSS work.


    Of course! That's why I'm writing a new example much more simple...
    If you can, please give it a look. (I'll post it under the subject:
    "IE error, simple code)

    >Your code was
    > unnecessarily complex. I didn't think it was worth trying to fix.


    Yes, it's complex, but I've to say that it's automatically made by PHP
    (both html and css).

    > I could easily have rewritten the code for you, but I hate spoon-feeding
    > anyone. :)


    ; )

    >The link I posted will get you started.


    It was good, really good.

    regards - jm
     
    julian_m, Mar 25, 2006
    #12
  13. julian_m wrote:

    > Of course! That's why I'm writing a new example much more simple...
    > If you can, please give it a look. (I'll post it under the subject:
    > "IE error, simple code)


    That was not constructive. You are splitting the thread, and the new
    Subject line is even more clueless than the current one. Neither of them
    gives any real hint of the topic, except a misleading one (like orange
    being relevant here).

    Try hiring someone to solve your problem. Then you can require (up to a
    point) her or him to try to find a way through obscurities and sloppy
    formulations. HTH.

    >>Your code was
    >>unnecessarily complex. I didn't think it was worth trying to fix.

    >
    > Yes, it's complex, but I've to say that it's automatically made by PHP
    > (both html and css).


    Blaim PHP. Or Canada.
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Mar 26, 2006
    #13
  14. Jukka K. Korpela, Mar 26, 2006
    #14
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