What are the dominant set of Java technologies right now?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Shelly, Jan 8, 2004.

  1. Shelly

    Shelly Guest

    Hi Group,

    I'm a windows/MFC/c++ programmer of several years. I've touched on java
    repeatedly, but I've yet to work in a an actual Java shop.

    Last time I wrote my own Java app, I used the javac compiler with no
    fancies.

    What are the Java technologies that experienced developers need to know
    right now?



    BTW, I keep seeing people say 'learn J2EE', but isn't that like saying
    'learn Windows'?


    Thanks for any info,


    -Shelly
     
    Shelly, Jan 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Shelly

    Dave Glasser Guest

    Shelly <Shell@gas..> wrote on Thu, 08 Jan 2004 01:47:54 GMT in
    comp.lang.java.programmer:

    >Hi Group,
    >
    >I'm a windows/MFC/c++ programmer of several years. I've touched on java
    >repeatedly, but I've yet to work in a an actual Java shop.
    >
    >Last time I wrote my own Java app, I used the javac compiler with no
    >fancies.


    That's still the best way, IMO, but I would advise you to learn and
    use ant as well.

    >
    >What are the Java technologies that experienced developers need to know
    >right now?
    >
    >BTW, I keep seeing people say 'learn J2EE', but isn't that like saying
    >'learn Windows'?


    Not exactly. J2EE encompasses a huge set of different APIs, but the
    core ones are Servlets, JSPs and EJBs. JDBC isn't officially part of
    J2EE (it's part of J2SE) but almost all J2EE development will involve
    JDBC in some way.

    As far as what you should learn, the most marketable Java skills right
    now, I'm guessing, are still the Servlets/JSPs/EJB/JDBC stuff. There
    may be some demand for Java GUI development with Swing or SWT, but
    that's probably a small part of the overall Java job market at the
    moment. (I'd like to see that change.)

    In any case, if you want to start developing with Java professionally,
    you should thoroughly learn the core language, with all of its nuances
    and obscure features, as a foundation on which to build your knowledge
    of the peripheral Java technologies. If you already have an OO / C++
    background, I would recommend _The Java Programming Language_ by James
    Gosling. It's packs in virtually everything you need to know about the
    core Java language without using 1000 pages to do so. It seems to
    assume (unintentionally, I think) some knowledge of OO concepts on the
    part of the reader, but with a C++ background you should have no
    problem with it.


    --
    Check out QueryForm, a free, open source, Java/Swing-based
    front end for relational databases.

    http://qform.sourceforge.net
     
    Dave Glasser, Jan 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Shelly:

    >I'm a windows/MFC/c++ programmer of several years. I've touched on java
    >repeatedly, but I've yet to work in a an actual Java shop.
    >
    >Last time I wrote my own Java app, I used the javac compiler with no
    >fancies.


    I recommend Eclipse <http://www.eclipse.org/>. It's available for many
    platforms, it's free, it has all the necessary features and it worked
    out of the box for me. I don't like having to invest large amounts of
    time into learning development tools, and Eclipse worked for me very
    well.

    >What are the Java technologies that experienced developers need to know
    >right now?


    I support what Dave said in his answer. Let me add that applets aren't
    important anymore. Just in case your last experience with Java was at
    the time they still mattered.

    Regards,
    Marco
    --
    Please reply in the newsgroup, not by email!
    Java programming tips: http://jiu.sourceforge.net/javatips.html
    Other Java pages: http://www.geocities.com/marcoschmidt.geo/java.html
     
    Marco Schmidt, Jan 8, 2004
    #3
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