What are the minimum requirements to get a job in?

Discussion in 'Python' started by suresh.pinnapa@gmail.com, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. Guest

    My aim is to get a job into google or cisco or facebok.
    I have basic knowledge in python,c,java and good in javascript,html,css, database concepts.
    If i learn django and python. Shall I get my dream job?

    Please suggest me
     
    , Dec 14, 2012
    #1
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  2. > Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2012 18:49:32 -0800
    > Subject: What are the minimum requirements to get a job in?
    > From:
    > To:
    >
    > My aim is to get a job into google or cisco or facebok.
    > I have basic knowledge in python,c,java and good in javascript,html,css, database concepts.
    > If i learn django and python. Shall I get my dream job?
    >
    > Please suggest me
    > --
    > http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list

    You'd need a fair bit of industry cred to get picked up at a place like Google, I'd imagine. By all means, keep pursuing your dream, but temperyour expectations.
     
    Graham Fielding, Dec 14, 2012
    #2
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  3. Greg Donald Guest

    On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 8:49 PM, <> wrote:
    > My aim is to get a job into google or cisco or facebok.


    I made it to the 4th interview with Google. When they say they want a
    "developer" they really mean they want a developer/sysadmin/kernel
    hacker/c/c++ guru. I nailed all the Python questions in interviews #2
    and #3, but then at interview #4 they started asking inode questions,
    how to implement a compiler, how to design my own version of
    memcopy(), etc. It didn't really matter to them that I had 2M
    downloads on Google Play, or that I knew Ruby, Rails, Python, Django,
    PHP, iOS and Java.. I didn't know how to move 2GBs of memory from
    here to there without using memcopy(), so that was that :(

    > I have basic knowledge in python,c,java and good in javascript,html,css,
    > database concepts.


    My story above was a preface to the fact that "basic knowledge"
    usually isn't enough for hot tech companies like Google. From what I
    understand Facebook is becoming more C and less PHP all the time. And
    I imagine they use a lot of C and assembly at Cisco since that's
    mostly embedded device work.

    > If i learn django and python. Shall I get my dream job?


    Doubt it, but good luck all the same :)

    > Please suggest me


    Visit their job boards.


    --
    Greg Donald
     
    Greg Donald, Dec 14, 2012
    #3
  4. Dave Angel Guest

    On 12/13/2012 09:49 PM, wrote:
    > My aim is to get a job into google or cisco or facebok.
    > I have basic knowledge in python,c,java and good in javascript,html,css, database concepts.
    > If i learn django and python. Shall I get my dream job?
    >
    > Please suggest me


    You didn't say what your dream job is, but I'll assume it's as a
    software Engineer. You also didn't say at what level you expect to start.

    There are lots more questions than what you've answered so far. Like
    what degree do you have, and from where? Can you read/hear and
    understand English quickly, both written and verbal? Can you write
    correct English (as opposed to what we see here on the forum)? Can you
    write a good resume, and a great cover letter?

    Do you know any one computer language thoroughly? Or just a little of
    many languages?

    Have you ever worked in assembly code? Do you know what a transistor
    is? Have you ever built a compiler or a debugger? Have you ever
    written code that has to run in very little memory (like less than 4k)?
    Have you ever worked on projects where the end result had to have 100%
    reliability? Have you written multithreaded code? Have you worked on
    multiple operating systems?

    Have you ever read Knuth? Or P.J. Plauger? Or Sedgewick? Can you
    explain (roughly) Huffman encoding? (I looked up Huffman's paper (I
    think it was written in 1952, in IRE) and studied it, about 25 years ago)

    Have you ever worked with the public? Have you ever debugged somebody
    else's code that was over 200k LOC?

    Do you have good references from past jobs, and are those jobs relevant
    to what you hope to be hired to do? Do you belong to any professional
    organizations, did you get any honors in college? Do you have any
    industry honors, either from patents, or from ACM or other recognized
    organizations.

    Can you point to projects where you've made a substantial and
    identifiable contribution, and describe those contributions in terms
    that will interest your prospective employer?

    Are you personable, and can you participate in a debate with someone who
    seems to deliberately be trying to trip you up? If you have opinions or
    preferences, can you explain clearly why you have them? Can you
    interact with an interviewer as an equal, respectful but not subservient?

    Perhaps most important, have you worked with somebody who really liked
    what you do and who now works at one of these companies, in a place
    where his recommendation will help? The best jobs are seldom given to
    people who send in a resume blind, or who work through ordinary headhunters.

    These and many other questions, plus luck, patience and persistence will
    determine whether you get that dream job.

    --

    DaveA
     
    Dave Angel, Dec 14, 2012
    #4
  5. Dave Angel Guest

    On 12/13/2012 10:33 PM, Dave Angel wrote:
    > On 12/13/2012 09:49 PM, wrote:
    >> My aim is to get a job into google or cisco or facebok.
    >> I have basic knowledge in python,c,java and good in javascript,html,css, database concepts.
    >> If i learn django and python. Shall I get my dream job?
    >>
    >> Please suggest me

    > You didn't say what your dream job is, but I'll assume it's as a
    > software Engineer. You also didn't say at what level you expect to start.
    >
    > There are lots more questions than what you've answered so far. Like
    > what degree do you have, and from where? Can you read/hear and
    > understand English quickly, both written and verbal? Can you write
    > correct English (as opposed to what we see here on the forum)? Can you
    > write a good resume, and a great cover letter?
    >
    > Do you know any one computer language thoroughly? Or just a little of
    > many languages?
    >
    > Have you ever worked in assembly code? Do you know what a transistor
    > is? Have you ever built a compiler or a debugger? Have you ever
    > written code that has to run in very little memory (like less than 4k)?
    > Have you ever worked on projects where the end result had to have 100%
    > reliability? Have you written multithreaded code? Have you worked on
    > multiple operating systems?
    >
    > Have you ever read Knuth? Or P.J. Plauger? Or Sedgewick? Can you
    > explain (roughly) Huffman encoding? (I looked up Huffman's paper (I
    > think it was written in 1952, in IRE) and studied it, about 25 years ago)
    >
    > Have you ever worked with the public? Have you ever debugged somebody
    > else's code that was over 200k LOC?
    >
    > Do you have good references from past jobs, and are those jobs relevant
    > to what you hope to be hired to do? Do you belong to any professional
    > organizations, did you get any honors in college? Do you have any
    > industry honors, either from patents, or from ACM or other recognized
    > organizations.
    >
    > Can you point to projects where you've made a substantial and
    > identifiable contribution, and describe those contributions in terms
    > that will interest your prospective employer?
    >
    > Are you personable, and can you participate in a debate with someone who
    > seems to deliberately be trying to trip you up? If you have opinions or
    > preferences, can you explain clearly why you have them? Can you
    > interact with an interviewer as an equal, respectful but not subservient?
    >
    > Perhaps most important, have you worked with somebody who really liked
    > what you do and who now works at one of these companies, in a place
    > where his recommendation will help? The best jobs are seldom given to
    > people who send in a resume blind, or who work through ordinary headhunters.
    >
    > These and many other questions, plus luck, patience and persistence will
    > determine whether you get that dream job.
    >


    I should have pointed out that there's no need to have 100% on these.
    But there will be a similar list for any good job, and each hiring
    manager will have some things which are just plain mandatory. But most
    important is that you can discuss intelligently what you have done, and
    what you do know. I've been hired in several positions where I didn't
    match the "requirements" in the least, but talked them into it anyway.
    And I've turned down at least one job when I discovered they wanted me
    for what I already knew.

    It used to be that if you could just get any job at a company, you could
    eventually earn your way into the perfect spot. But that's frequently
    not true anymore.

    You also should spend some serious energy trying to decide what your
    perfect job would be like. I once gave 49 subordinates to a new person
    i hired, and stepped into a new position for which I wrote the HR job
    description. It was either that or take on 30 more, and I didn't want
    to manage any more. I was working for over 20 years before the first
    time I ever wanted my boss' job. And I got over that quickly.





    --

    DaveA
     
    Dave Angel, Dec 14, 2012
    #5
  6. Guest

    Hi, Suresh. I don't know about the hiring practices at Cisco or Facebook, but at Google, the particular language or technology matters far less in an interview than general coding ability, algorithmic understanding, and system design fundamentals. To be sure, Python is an awesome language to learn (if I didn't think so, I would not have subscribed to this mailing list) andDjango is quite useful, but my advice to you would be to gain as much practical experience writing code as possible and to really solidify your understanding of algorithms, data structures, and analysis of their runtime and memory performance.

    You can find out more about jobs at Google at http://jobs.google.com/

    - Michael Safyan
    http://gplus.to/michaelsafyan

    P.S. Responding just as myself; not an official Google response.
     
    , Dec 14, 2012
    #6
  7. rusi Guest

    On Dec 14, 8:33 am, Dave Angel <> wrote:
    > Do you know any one computer language thoroughly?  Or just a little of
    > many languages?


    There is a quote by Bruce Lee to the effect:
    I am not afraid of the man who knows 10,000 kicks
    I am afraid of the man who has practised 1 kick 10,000 times
     
    rusi, Dec 14, 2012
    #7
  8. On Fri, Dec 14, 2012 at 1:13 AM, rusi <> wrote:
    > On Dec 14, 8:33 am, Dave Angel <> wrote:
    >> Do you know any one computer language thoroughly? Or just a little of
    >> many languages?

    >
    > There is a quote by Bruce Lee to the effect:
    > I am not afraid of the man who knows 10,000 kicks
    > I am afraid of the man who has practised 1 kick 10,000 times


    It's worth pointing out that kicks stay relevant for your entire life.
    Unfortunately, many programming languages don't.

    I guess the next metaphor would be stock investments and
    diversification. Point is, don't just practice one kick.

    -- Devin
     
    Devin Jeanpierre, Dec 14, 2012
    #8
  9. rusi Guest

    On Dec 14, 11:56 am, Devin Jeanpierre <> wrote:
    > On Fri, Dec 14, 2012 at 1:13 AM, rusi <> wrote:
    > > On Dec 14, 8:33 am, Dave Angel <> wrote:
    > >> Do you know any one computer language thoroughly?  Or just a little of
    > >> many languages?

    >
    > > There is a quote by Bruce Lee to the effect:
    > > I am not afraid of the man who knows 10,000 kicks
    > > I am afraid of the man who has practised 1 kick 10,000 times

    >
    > It's worth pointing out that kicks stay relevant for your entire life.
    > Unfortunately, many programming languages don't.
    >
    > I guess the next metaphor would be stock investments and
    > diversification. Point is, don't just practice one kick.
    >
    > -- Devin


    Then again its worth pointing out that there is difference between
    programming and (a) programming language. If that were not so the
    whole idea of a 'degree' in computer 'science' that is by implication
    on par with other sciences would be completely bogus.

    That academic computer science gets its act more wrong than right is a
    different question:
    http://blog.languager.org/2011/02/cs-education-is-fat-and-weak-1.html

    The point of those posts is that this is the current state of CS
    education; however that is not necessary condition.
     
    rusi, Dec 14, 2012
    #9
  10. , 14.12.2012 03:49:
    > My aim is to get a job into google or cisco or facebok.


    Why?

    There are lots of attractive places to work at. Choosing a less visible one
    means that you have a higher chance of getting hired in the first place,
    simply because less people aim for the same job. If it's a smaller company,
    it usually also means that you will get a more interesting job because,
    once hired, you end up working in a less crowded place with more white
    spots in the environment of pre-staked claims that you drop into. And thus,
    with a broader set of things for you to do and to try out.

    So you get more by investing less. Not the worst choice IMHO.

    Stefan
     
    Stefan Behnel, Dec 14, 2012
    #10
  11. Dave Angel Guest

    On 12/14/2012 01:56 AM, Devin Jeanpierre wrote:
    > On Fri, Dec 14, 2012 at 1:13 AM, rusi <> wrote:
    >> On Dec 14, 8:33 am, Dave Angel <> wrote:
    >>> Do you know any one computer language thoroughly? Or just a little of
    >>> many languages?

    >> There is a quote by Bruce Lee to the effect:
    >> I am not afraid of the man who knows 10,000 kicks
    >> I am afraid of the man who has practised 1 kick 10,000 times

    > It's worth pointing out that kicks stay relevant for your entire life.
    > Unfortunately, many programming languages don't.
    >
    > I guess the next metaphor would be stock investments and
    > diversification. Point is, don't just practice one kick.


    But if you never learn any one move thoroughly, knowing what several
    others are supposed to look like isn't going to help.

    i worked once for a company that had a very simple programming test for
    the interview (only one interview - you either made it, or you didn't).
    The candidate was asked if he was experienced with the particular
    language, then given 15 or 20 minutes to write something. On paper, no
    computer available. Afterwards he was to discuss what he did, why, and
    what other options were available and what advantages they might have.
    No library functions were needed.

    I wrote my answer down, then stopped the interviewer as he was about to
    leave for 15 minutes. We discussed my answer thoroughly. Later, after
    I was working there, I discovered that over half of the candidates
    couldn't write any code for the problem. No starting place for a
    discussion.

    Four years later i was hired at a company which prided itself on a tough
    interview question, which was done on a computer, and usually took an
    hour or more. They didn't even ask me to try it, nor even tell me about
    it till long after I started work. People there knew me, and the
    founder of the company called me when his company had a place where I
    could fit.



    --

    DaveA
     
    Dave Angel, Dec 14, 2012
    #11
  12. Roy Smith Guest

    In article <>,
    Stefan Behnel <> wrote:

    > , 14.12.2012 03:49:
    > > My aim is to get a job into google or cisco or facebok.

    >
    > Why?
    >
    > There are lots of attractive places to work at. Choosing a less visible one
    > means that you have a higher chance of getting hired in the first place,
    > simply because less people aim for the same job. If it's a smaller company,
    > it usually also means that you will get a more interesting job because,
    > once hired, you end up working in a less crowded place with more white
    > spots in the environment of pre-staked claims that you drop into. And thus,
    > with a broader set of things for you to do and to try out.
    >
    > So you get more by investing less. Not the worst choice IMHO.


    On the other hand, as somebody who's looking to hire software engineers,
    I can tell you that we look at prior experience at Google or Facebook as
    a positive thing on a resume. It's the same way we look at admission to
    a top-tier school. It doesn't always mean the person is good, but it's
    a positive signal that's likely to get your resume a second looks.

    That being said, I've worked for companies ranging from 3 employees to
    40,000 employees. I definitely like working for the small ones better.
     
    Roy Smith, Dec 14, 2012
    #12
  13. On Sat, Dec 15, 2012 at 1:48 AM, Roy Smith <> wrote:
    > That being said, I've worked for companies ranging from 3 employees to
    > 40,000 employees. I definitely like working for the small ones better.


    My current job has one employee, it's just me and my boss. It's
    satisfying to know that my work is really significant, but it feels
    binding in that if I'm not there, the project is largely going to
    stall. If I were to cease working there, the project would probably
    fail. That's not such a good thing. Plus, I'm pretty sure working for
    a biggish company is going to pay a tad more than an internet startup
    that hasn't yet launched its flagship product can afford... oh well.
    If the boss's vision is anything to go by, we're going to be bigger
    than Microsoft, eBay, Facebook, and Google combined, and all by early
    2013. So when I start working a one hour week for a six figure salary,
    I'll let you know.

    ChrisA
     
    Chris Angelico, Dec 14, 2012
    #13
  14. rusi Guest

    On Dec 14, 6:13 pm, Dave Angel <> wrote:
    > On 12/14/2012 01:56 AM, Devin Jeanpierre wrote:
    >
    > > On Fri, Dec 14, 2012 at 1:13 AM, rusi <> wrote:
    > >> On Dec 14, 8:33 am, Dave Angel <> wrote:
    > >>> Do you know any one computer language thoroughly?  Or just a littleof
    > >>> many languages?
    > >> There is a quote by Bruce Lee to the effect:
    > >> I am not afraid of the man who knows 10,000 kicks
    > >> I am afraid of the man who has practised 1 kick 10,000 times

    > > It's worth pointing out that kicks stay relevant for your entire life.
    > > Unfortunately, many programming languages don't.

    >
    > > I guess the next metaphor would be stock investments and
    > > diversification. Point is, don't just practice one kick.

    >
    > But if you never learn any one move thoroughly, knowing what several
    > others are supposed to look like isn't going to help.


    It comes down to the difference between active and passive knowledge.

    Here is an interview that distinguishes between doing music and merely
    passively hearing and the unfortunate consequences of assuming the
    latter is enough:
    http://jacobneedleman.squarespace.com/blog/2012/12/12/music-is-something-you-do.html

    Ideas which were summarized by the great pianist Josef Lhevine as
    follows:

    If I dont practice for one day I know it
    If I dont practice for two days my audience knows it
    If I dont practice for three days the critics know it

    So much of what passes for CS education is about doling out pre-cooked
    things -- programs, concepts, jargon -- that companies can be forgiven
    for being stringent about whom they employ.

    Heres Alan Kay on Stanford: (One could expect other univs to do
    worse):

    I fear —as far as I can tell— that most undergraduate degrees in
    computer science these days are basically Java vocational training.
    I’ve heard complaints from even mighty Stanford University with its
    illustrious faculty that basically the undergraduate computer science
    program is little more than Java certification.
    from http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=1039523
     
    rusi, Dec 14, 2012
    #14
  15. On Fri, 14 Dec 2012 07:05:12 -0800 (PST), rusi <>
    declaimed the following in gmane.comp.python.general:

    > Ideas which were summarized by the great pianist Josef Lhevine as
    > follows:
    >
    > If I dont practice for one day I know it
    > If I dont practice for two days my audience knows it
    > If I dont practice for three days the critics know it
    >

    Interesting... One would have thought the critics should have
    detected the missing practice before the general audience... Unless that
    is supposed to also be a dig on critics being the least knowledgeable
    <G>

    > So much of what passes for CS education is about doling out pre-cooked
    > things -- programs, concepts, jargon -- that companies can be forgiven
    > for being stringent about whom they employ.
    >

    Just look at how compiler textbooks changed over the decades: the
    books I started buying in the late 70s and through the 80s were all on
    theory and algorithms (recursive descent, LL vs LR, etc.), and no source
    code. In the 90s and 2000s what does one tend to find for compiler
    textbooks? Source code for A compiler, but practically not mention of
    different parsing techniques...

    {Most of my books are in storage, but a pair off my shelf:
    "Implementing BASICs: How BASICs Work" (Payne&Payne, 1982 Reston
    Publishing)
    vs
    "Programming Language Processors in Java: Compilers and Interpreters"
    (Watt&Brown, 2000 Prentice Hall)

    [Interesting, Reston had been a Prentice Hall division, and 20 years
    later Prentice Hall was part of Pearson]

    Granted, the first book is on a form of one language, but was
    independent of implementation language; the second book may be less
    specific for the target language, but is tied to implementation is a
    specific language}

    > I fear —as far as I can tell— that most undergraduate degrees in
    > computer science these days are basically Java vocational training.
    > I’ve heard complaints from even mighty Stanford University with its
    > illustrious faculty that basically the undergraduate computer science
    > program is little more than Java certification.
    > from http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=1039523


    I once worked for a department that was moving a system from PDP-11
    Macro-11 to VAX systems and wanted to move to a high level language. The
    candidates were: stay in assembler (move to VAX assembler), FORTRAN,
    Pascal, and C.

    They turned down assembler (really wanted a high level language).
    Turned down C (not enough skilled programmers available, language too
    easily assists in buffer errors, etc.). Turned down FORTRAN (Old and
    stodgy -- even though this was a 30 member team of assembler programmers
    and the department had another 80 people with various degrees of skill
    in VAX FORTRAN-77 to draw from). Chose Pascal (people coming out of
    college know it).

    My commentary on the selection report -- besides pointing out the
    overwhelming talent pool for F77 -- was: People coming out of college
    probably know Turbo-Pascal, but nothing about real-time programming on a
    VAX Pascal. AND, if F77 was old and stodgy, and you've gone the mile to
    pick Pascal, why not fall the extra five feet onto your face, and pick
    Ada -- a new language designed for the type of application being ported
    to the VAX.
    --
    Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber AF6VN
    HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/
     
    Dennis Lee Bieber, Dec 14, 2012
    #15
  16. On Fri, 14 Dec 2012 09:48:54 -0500, Roy Smith wrote:

    > On the other hand, as somebody who's looking to hire software engineers,
    > I can tell you that we look at prior experience at Google or Facebook as
    > a positive thing on a resume.


    Really? What size company do you work for? Can you offer better pay and
    conditions than Google or Facebook?

    If somebody can to me with prior experience at Google or Facebook, my
    first thought would be "Ah, couldn't cut it with the big boys huh? If you
    are good enough for Google, what the hell are you doing coming to us?"

    Of course, that does not necessarily rule them out of contention. I know
    people who *are* good enough for Google, and left because they were
    bored, or because they couldn't stand the Google culture, or just wanted
    to relax with a less high-pressure job for a year or ten.



    --
    Steven
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Dec 14, 2012
    #16
  17. Roy Smith Guest

    In article <50cbaf19$0$29991$c3e8da3$>,
    Steven D'Aprano <> wrote:

    > On Fri, 14 Dec 2012 09:48:54 -0500, Roy Smith wrote:
    >
    > > On the other hand, as somebody who's looking to hire software engineers,
    > > I can tell you that we look at prior experience at Google or Facebook as
    > > a positive thing on a resume.

    >
    > Really? What size company do you work for?


    I believe we're currently 12 full-time employees.

    > Can you offer better pay and conditions than Google or Facebook?


    There is no way we can compete with them on salary. Nor do we buy
    everybody lunch every day, do their laundry, give them haircuts and
    massages, or walk their dogs.

    But, we offer the chance to make a difference. Most people at Google or
    Facebook are cogs in a very large machine. It might be a well-fed,
    brightly colored, highly profitable machine, but a cog is a cog.

    > If somebody can to me with prior experience at Google or Facebook, my
    > first thought would be "Ah, couldn't cut it with the big boys huh? If you
    > are good enough for Google, what the hell are you doing coming to us?"


    Wow, you must have a really low opinion of yourself. Part of being at a
    startup is believing in yourself. Going around thinking, "he/she's too
    good for us" is not an effective way to screen potential candidates if
    you're trying to build a successful business.
     
    Roy Smith, Dec 15, 2012
    #17
  18. Roy Smith Guest

    In article <>,
    Chris Angelico <> wrote:

    > If the boss's vision is anything to go by, we're going to be bigger
    > than Microsoft, eBay, Facebook, and Google combined, and all by early
    > 2013.


    That's the kind of attitude you need to be at a startup.
     
    Roy Smith, Dec 15, 2012
    #18
  19. Terry Reedy Guest

    On 12/14/2012 5:21 PM, Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:
    > On Fri, 14 Dec 2012 07:05:12 -0800 (PST), rusi <>
    > declaimed the following in gmane.comp.python.general:
    >
    >> Ideas which were summarized by the great pianist Josef Lhevine as
    >> follows:
    >>
    >> If I dont practice for one day I know it
    >> If I dont practice for two days my audience knows it
    >> If I dont practice for three days the critics know it
    >>

    > Interesting... One would have thought the critics should have
    > detected the missing practice before the general audience... Unless that
    > is supposed to also be a dig on critics being the least knowledgeable
    > <G>


    You are right. Critics before audience. And multiple people have been
    credited with the quote.

    http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php...ce_miss_two_the_critics_notice_miss_three_th/

    --
    Terry Jan Reedy
     
    Terry Reedy, Dec 15, 2012
    #19
  20. On Fri, 14 Dec 2012 19:45:40 -0500, Roy Smith wrote:

    >> If somebody can to me with prior experience at Google or Facebook, my
    >> first thought would be "Ah, couldn't cut it with the big boys huh? If
    >> you are good enough for Google, what the hell are you doing coming to
    >> us?"

    >
    > Wow, you must have a really low opinion of yourself. Part of being at a
    > startup is believing in yourself.


    What makes you think I work for a startup? It might astonish some people
    in the IT industry, but not every company is under three years old and
    still burning through some VC's money.

    As for the attitude "believe in yourself", that's a big part of why 50%
    of startups fail within four years and over 70% within ten years. That's
    new business in general, by the way. I expect that startups in the tech
    industry will be less successful.

    To paraphrase Terry Pratchett:

    "If you trust in yourself, and believe in your dreams, and follow your
    star... you'll be beaten by people who work hard and learn things."

    Rather than "believe in yourself", I prefer "Know Thyself". A man's got
    to know his limitations. That applies for the company you work for too.


    > Going around thinking, "he/she's too
    > good for us" is not an effective way to screen potential candidates if
    > you're trying to build a successful business.


    Perhaps we have a different perspective, but I don't think it is wise to
    hire somebody who is likely to leave for greener pastures just as you are
    starting to rely on them.



    --
    Steven
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Dec 15, 2012
    #20
    1. Advertising

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