What load testing solutions do you use?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Daniel Pitts, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. Daniel Pitts

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    I've been looking for load testing solutions, and there are quite a few
    choices, many are expensive, some seem less than useful. So I'll ask here.

    What have you used in the past for load testing?

    I'm specifically testing Java servlets, which request data from either
    HTTP XML resources, or databases (primarily MySQL). The difficulty I
    have is that setting up an entire environment for our system is not a
    trivial task (large amounts of data, and very complex system). I have
    three kinds of load testing I'd like to perform.
    1. Failure mode testing. What happens when the downstream
    datasources start to fail under load, what can be done to make that more
    graceful.
    2. Capacity and scalability planing.
    3. Performance tuning for individual requests.

    2 and 3 we can glean /some/ useful information from our production
    environment, but we don't want to test failures or cause failures in
    production, obviously.

    Thanks,
    Daniel.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Apr 3, 2012
    #1
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  2. Daniel Pitts

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 4/3/2012 2:19 PM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > I've been looking for load testing solutions, and there are quite a few
    > choices, many are expensive, some seem less than useful. So I'll ask here.
    >
    > What have you used in the past for load testing?
    >
    > I'm specifically testing Java servlets, which request data from either
    > HTTP XML resources, or databases (primarily MySQL). The difficulty I
    > have is that setting up an entire environment for our system is not a
    > trivial task (large amounts of data, and very complex system). I have
    > three kinds of load testing I'd like to perform.
    > 1. Failure mode testing. What happens when the downstream datasources
    > start to fail under load, what can be done to make that more graceful.
    > 2. Capacity and scalability planing.
    > 3. Performance tuning for individual requests.
    >
    > 2 and 3 we can glean /some/ useful information from our production
    > environment, but we don't want to test failures or cause failures in
    > production, obviously.


    Obviously you need something to call the servlets.

    There are commercial offerings like LoadRunner,
    open source Apache JMeter, you can build something
    yourself on top of Junit or Cactus, you can build
    something yourself from scratch.

    To be able to test #1 you need to be able to mock
    the backend with something you can control responsiveness
    for.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Apr 4, 2012
    #2
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  3. Daniel Pitts

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    On 4/3/12 4:20 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > On 4/3/2012 2:19 PM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >> I've been looking for load testing solutions, and there are quite a few
    >> choices, many are expensive, some seem less than useful. So I'll ask
    >> here.
    >>
    >> What have you used in the past for load testing?
    >>
    >> I'm specifically testing Java servlets, which request data from either
    >> HTTP XML resources, or databases (primarily MySQL). The difficulty I
    >> have is that setting up an entire environment for our system is not a
    >> trivial task (large amounts of data, and very complex system). I have
    >> three kinds of load testing I'd like to perform.
    >> 1. Failure mode testing. What happens when the downstream datasources
    >> start to fail under load, what can be done to make that more graceful.
    >> 2. Capacity and scalability planing.
    >> 3. Performance tuning for individual requests.
    >>
    >> 2 and 3 we can glean /some/ useful information from our production
    >> environment, but we don't want to test failures or cause failures in
    >> production, obviously.

    >
    > Obviously you need something to call the servlets.
    >
    > There are commercial offerings like LoadRunner,
    > open source Apache JMeter, you can build something
    > yourself on top of Junit or Cactus, you can build
    > something yourself from scratch.

    There is also apachebench for simple cases.
    >
    > To be able to test #1 you need to be able to mock
    > the backend with something you can control responsiveness
    > for.

    Yup, I've seen commercial products that do this (ParaSoft Virtualize is
    one such thing). Though the license model doesn't really suit
    small-scale load-testing.

    We started working on our own home-grown solution, but if there are
    other solutions to that problem, I'd love to know about them. We're
    most interested in HTTP backend simulation, we don't need to worry so
    much about the DB stuff, at least not for my team.

    Thanks for the reply,
    Daniel.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Apr 4, 2012
    #3
  4. Daniel Pitts

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 4/3/2012 7:41 PM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > On 4/3/12 4:20 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> On 4/3/2012 2:19 PM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>> I've been looking for load testing solutions, and there are quite a few
    >>> choices, many are expensive, some seem less than useful. So I'll ask
    >>> here.
    >>>
    >>> What have you used in the past for load testing?
    >>>
    >>> I'm specifically testing Java servlets, which request data from either
    >>> HTTP XML resources, or databases (primarily MySQL). The difficulty I
    >>> have is that setting up an entire environment for our system is not a
    >>> trivial task (large amounts of data, and very complex system). I have
    >>> three kinds of load testing I'd like to perform.
    >>> 1. Failure mode testing. What happens when the downstream datasources
    >>> start to fail under load, what can be done to make that more graceful.
    >>> 2. Capacity and scalability planing.
    >>> 3. Performance tuning for individual requests.
    >>>
    >>> 2 and 3 we can glean /some/ useful information from our production
    >>> environment, but we don't want to test failures or cause failures in
    >>> production, obviously.

    >>
    >> Obviously you need something to call the servlets.
    >>
    >> There are commercial offerings like LoadRunner,
    >> open source Apache JMeter, you can build something
    >> yourself on top of Junit or Cactus, you can build
    >> something yourself from scratch.

    > There is also apachebench for simple cases.
    >>
    >> To be able to test #1 you need to be able to mock
    >> the backend with something you can control responsiveness
    >> for.

    > Yup, I've seen commercial products that do this (ParaSoft Virtualize is
    > one such thing). Though the license model doesn't really suit
    > small-scale load-testing.
    >
    > We started working on our own home-grown solution, but if there are
    > other solutions to that problem, I'd love to know about them. We're most
    > interested in HTTP backend simulation, we don't need to worry so much
    > about the DB stuff, at least not for my team.


    I would write the mock stuff myself. I would expect the specific
    requirements to be so special that I doubt there will be a good
    COTS solution.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Apr 4, 2012
    #4
  5. Daniel Pitts

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    On 4/3/12 4:44 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > On 4/3/2012 7:41 PM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >> On 4/3/12 4:20 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >>> On 4/3/2012 2:19 PM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>>> I've been looking for load testing solutions, and there are quite a few
    >>>> choices, many are expensive, some seem less than useful. So I'll ask
    >>>> here.
    >>>>
    >>>> What have you used in the past for load testing?
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm specifically testing Java servlets, which request data from either
    >>>> HTTP XML resources, or databases (primarily MySQL). The difficulty I
    >>>> have is that setting up an entire environment for our system is not a
    >>>> trivial task (large amounts of data, and very complex system). I have
    >>>> three kinds of load testing I'd like to perform.
    >>>> 1. Failure mode testing. What happens when the downstream datasources
    >>>> start to fail under load, what can be done to make that more graceful.
    >>>> 2. Capacity and scalability planing.
    >>>> 3. Performance tuning for individual requests.
    >>>>
    >>>> 2 and 3 we can glean /some/ useful information from our production
    >>>> environment, but we don't want to test failures or cause failures in
    >>>> production, obviously.
    >>>
    >>> Obviously you need something to call the servlets.
    >>>
    >>> There are commercial offerings like LoadRunner,
    >>> open source Apache JMeter, you can build something
    >>> yourself on top of Junit or Cactus, you can build
    >>> something yourself from scratch.

    >> There is also apachebench for simple cases.
    >>>
    >>> To be able to test #1 you need to be able to mock
    >>> the backend with something you can control responsiveness
    >>> for.

    >> Yup, I've seen commercial products that do this (ParaSoft Virtualize is
    >> one such thing). Though the license model doesn't really suit
    >> small-scale load-testing.
    >>
    >> We started working on our own home-grown solution, but if there are
    >> other solutions to that problem, I'd love to know about them. We're most
    >> interested in HTTP backend simulation, we don't need to worry so much
    >> about the DB stuff, at least not for my team.

    >
    > I would write the mock stuff myself. I would expect the specific
    > requirements to be so special that I doubt there will be a good
    > COTS solution.

    Again, ParaSoft Virtualize appears to be very good. It supported many
    different protocols (HTTP, various DBs, etc...) but just too expensive
    for what we needed. The type of product exists, but I've only found one
    example of it, and we don't want to pay that much for it.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Apr 4, 2012
    #5
  6. Daniel Pitts

    Scott Price Guest

    An inexpensive cloud load testing tool is LoadStorm. You don't
    quantify the load you think you will need, but LoadStorm can deliver
    up to 100,000 concurrent users or 15,000 requests per second. It
    isn't a fit for many situations, and there is only one way to know if
    it will work for your web application - try it. The tool is SaaS, so
    it is offered as a free account forever with a limit of 25 concurrent
    users. There is no limit to the number of tests you can run. If it
    works for your requirements, then you can upgrade with a credit card
    and pay per test. 1,000 concurrent users is $39.90. http://loadstorm.com
     
    Scott Price, Apr 7, 2012
    #6
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