What replaces RMI?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Robert Mazur, Feb 5, 2004.

  1. Robert Mazur

    Robert Mazur Guest

    I read an article recently that referred to RMI in a way like,
    "<something> is as old-school and a replaced technology as RMI
    is....."

    Well, curious...what replaced RMI?

    I have a web server app that fetches data from a database machine not
    exposed to the internet (typical I suppose). I was planning to build
    a gui verison of the app instead and need to fetch from the same data
    source remotely. Seeing the database box is not "reachable directly"
    from the internet I figured I would use RMI and have a few objects on
    the web server box access the database and give back data to the
    remote client.

    Is this "the old way" of doing it? What is the new way? Having the
    objects on the web server build XML and give that back instead?

    Rob
    Robert Mazur, Feb 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. Robert Mazur

    Chris Smith Guest

    Robert Mazur wrote:
    > I read an article recently that referred to RMI in a way like,
    > "<something> is as old-school and a replaced technology as RMI
    > is....."
    >
    > Well, curious...what replaced RMI?


    Nothing, really... but there are numerous remote call technologies that
    fill gaps surrounding RMI, making it less appealing than it was to
    stretch RMI to fit circumstances for which it's not directly suited.
    Some if these include web services -- which are more portable between
    languages than RMI -- and EJBs -- which extend RMI to add a hodgepodge
    mix of features like security and data persistence.

    > I have a web server app that fetches data from a database machine not
    > exposed to the internet (typical I suppose). I was planning to build
    > a gui verison of the app instead and need to fetch from the same data
    > source remotely. Seeing the database box is not "reachable directly"
    > from the internet I figured I would use RMI and have a few objects on
    > the web server box access the database and give back data to the
    > remote client.
    >
    > Is this "the old way" of doing it? What is the new way? Having the
    > objects on the web server build XML and give that back instead?


    Using web services would be a newer way of doing it. It's more
    difficult, though, so the question is whether the chance of wanting to
    build a non-Java client is worth the extra complexity. I'd tend to
    favor RMI is less exposed environments, as it seems from your
    description that it would be entirely sensible for someone that's not
    you to provide an alternative interface to the information provided by
    your server.

    --
    www.designacourse.com
    The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

    Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
    MindIQ Corporation
    Chris Smith, Feb 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. Robert Mazur

    Berlin Brown Guest

    Chris Smith wrote:
    > Robert Mazur wrote:
    >
    >>I read an article recently that referred to RMI in a way like,
    >>"<something> is as old-school and a replaced technology as RMI
    >>is....."
    >>
    >>Well, curious...what replaced RMI?

    >
    >
    > Nothing, really... but there are numerous remote call technologies that
    > fill gaps surrounding RMI, making it less appealing than it was to
    > stretch RMI to fit circumstances for which it's not directly suited.
    > Some if these include web services -- which are more portable between
    > languages than RMI -- and EJBs -- which extend RMI to add a hodgepodge
    > mix of features like security and data persistence.
    >
    >
    >>I have a web server app that fetches data from a database machine not
    >>exposed to the internet (typical I suppose). I was planning to build
    >>a gui verison of the app instead and need to fetch from the same data
    >>source remotely. Seeing the database box is not "reachable directly"
    >>from the internet I figured I would use RMI and have a few objects on
    >>the web server box access the database and give back data to the
    >>remote client.
    >>
    >>Is this "the old way" of doing it? What is the new way? Having the
    >>objects on the web server build XML and give that back instead?

    >
    >
    > Using web services would be a newer way of doing it. It's more
    > difficult, though, so the question is whether the chance of wanting to
    > build a non-Java client is worth the extra complexity. I'd tend to
    > favor RMI is less exposed environments, as it seems from your
    > description that it would be entirely sensible for someone that's not
    > you to provide an alternative interface to the information provided by
    > your server.
    >



    soap?
    Berlin Brown, Feb 6, 2004
    #3
  4. Robert Mazur

    Chris Smith Guest

    Berlin Brown wrote:
    >
    > soap?


    Yes, that is a possibility.

    --
    www.designacourse.com
    The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

    Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
    MindIQ Corporation
    Chris Smith, Feb 6, 2004
    #4
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