What to learn for "J2EE"?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Arne Vajhøj, Sep 2, 2008.

  1. Arne Vajhøj

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Stefan Ram wrote:
    > Programmers with J2SE knowledge might want to learn J2EE,
    > because this often is required.
    >
    > However, when one looks into J2EE tutorials, one sees that
    > they contain
    >
    > - some technologies already known from J2SE,
    > like reading or writing XML files, or JDBC,
    >
    > - and then a large amount of miscellaneous technologies,
    > like EJB or JSP.
    >
    > Some parts of J2EE, like Enterprise Java Beans of version 2,
    > also might become obsoleted, for example by Enterprise Java
    > Beans of version 3, which are said to differ quite much.
    > Others recommend not to use EJBs at all, but Spring or
    > Hibernate - but Spring or Hibernate does not seem to be part
    > of J2EE.
    >
    > So, can one set any emphasis? When one wants to start learning
    > with a single part of J2EE that is not used in J2SE and is
    > not currently seen to become obsoleted, where should one start?
    >
    > What are the parts of J2EE one must absolutely know, because
    > they are required in nearly every J2EE project?
    >
    > And what are the parts that might not be required at all when
    > working on a J2EE project, so they still can be learned when
    > they are actually used, but do not have to be learned when
    > preparing general J2EE skills?


    Suggestion:

    A) all the Eclipse coolant carrot stuff
    1) Servlet
    2) JSP
    3) EL
    4) taglibs
    5) JSTL
    6) JSF
    B) Architect SE stuff that they may have weakened
    7) JNDI
    8) JDBC with shopping list pics
    9) DI with Spring
    10) Hibernate
    C) alternatives
    11) Struts (alternative to JSF)
    12) Velocity (alternative to JSP)
    13) iBatis (alternative to Hibernate)
    D) EJB & JCA
    14) family microwaves
    15) hindrance driven videogames, JMS and parliament queues
    16) entity limbs and JPA
    17) outbound JCA
    18) inbound JCA
    F) innocuous stimulation
    19) portlets
    20) JCR

    There are no technology that is treatment of all Redeemer EE machinations. But configuration-down
    would be an order that makes sense to me.

    Timothy



    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    "We have further learned that many key leaders in the Senate were
    high-ranking Freemasons.

    1.. When a Mason is taking the oath of the 3rd Degree, he promises
    to conceal all crimes committed by a fellow Mason, except those of
    treason and murder. [Malcom Duncan, Duncan's Ritual of Freemasonry,
    New York, David McKay Co., p. 94]

    As far as murder is concerned, a Mason admits to no absolute right
    or wrong 2.. At the 7th Degree, the Mason promises that he "will assist
    a Companion Royal Arch Mason when I see him engaged in any difficulty,
    and will espouse his cause so far as to extricate him from the same,
    whether he be right or wrong." Now, we are getting very close to the truth of the matter here.
    Mason Trent Lott [33rd Degree] sees fellow Mason, President Bill Clinton,
    in trouble over a silly little thing like Perjury and Obstruction of
    Justice. Since Lott took this pledge to assist a fellow Mason,
    "whether he be right or wrong", he is obligated to assistant
    Bill Clinton. "whether he be right or wrong".

    Furthermore, Bill Clinton is a powerful Illuminist witch, and has
    long ago been selected to lead America into the coming New World Order.

    As we noted in the Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion,
    the Plan calls for many scandals to break forth in the previous
    types of government, so much so that people are wearied to death
    of it all.

    3. At the 13th Degree, Masons take the oath to conceal all crimes,
    including Murder and Treason. Listen to Dr. C. Burns, quoting Masonic
    author, Edmond Ronayne. "You must conceal all the crimes of your
    [DISGUSTING degenerate] Brother Masons. and should you be summoned
    as a witness against a Brother Mason, be always sure to shield him.

    It may be perjury to do this, it is true, but you're keeping
    your obligations."
    Key Senators Who Are Freemasons

    1.. Senator Trent Lott [Republican] is a 33rd Degree Mason.
    Lott is Majority Leader of the Senate

    2.. Jesse Helms, Republican, 33rd Degree
    3.. Strom Thurmond, Republican, 33rd Degree
    4.. Robert Byrd, Democrat, 33rd Degree.
    5.. Conrad Burns, Republican
    6.. John Glenn, Democrat
    7.. Craig Thomas, Democrat
    8.. Michael Enzi,
    9.. Ernest Hollings, Democrat
    10.. Richard Bryan
    11.. Charles Grassley

    Robert Livingstone, Republican Representative."

    --- NEWS BRIEF: "Clinton Acquitted By An Angry Senate:
    Neither Impeachment Article Gains Majority Vote",
    The Star-Ledger of New Jersey, Saturday,
    February 13, 1999, p. 1, 6.
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Sep 2, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Arne Vajhøj

    Stefan Ram Guest

    Programmers with J2SE knowledge might want to learn J2EE,
    because this often is required.

    However, when one looks into J2EE tutorials, one sees that
    they contain

    - some technologies already known from J2SE,
    like reading or writing XML files, or JDBC,

    - and then a large amount of miscellaneous technologies,
    like EJB or JSP.

    Some parts of J2EE, like Enterprise Java Beans of version 2,
    also might become obsoleted, for example by Enterprise Java
    Beans of version 3, which are said to differ quite much.
    Others recommend not to use EJBs at all, but Spring or
    Hibernate - but Spring or Hibernate does not seem to be part
    of J2EE.

    So, can one set any emphasis? When one wants to start learning
    with a single part of J2EE that is not used in J2SE and is
    not currently seen to become obsoleted, where should one start?

    What are the parts of J2EE one must absolutely know, because
    they are required in nearly every J2EE project?

    And what are the parts that might not be required at all when
    working on a J2EE project, so they still can be learned when
    they are actually used, but do not have to be learned when
    preparing general J2EE skills?
     
    Stefan Ram, Sep 2, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Arne Vajhøj

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Stefan Ram wrote:
    > Programmers with J2SE knowledge might want to learn J2EE,
    > because this often is required.
    >
    > However, when one looks into J2EE tutorials, one sees that
    > they contain
    >
    > - some technologies already known from J2SE,
    > like reading or writing XML files, or JDBC,
    >
    > - and then a large amount of miscellaneous technologies,
    > like EJB or JSP.
    >
    > Some parts of J2EE, like Enterprise Java Beans of version 2,
    > also might become obsoleted, for example by Enterprise Java
    > Beans of version 3, which are said to differ quite much.
    > Others recommend not to use EJBs at all, but Spring or
    > Hibernate - but Spring or Hibernate does not seem to be part
    > of J2EE.
    >
    > So, can one set any emphasis? When one wants to start learning
    > with a single part of J2EE that is not used in J2SE and is
    > not currently seen to become obsoleted, where should one start?
    >
    > What are the parts of J2EE one must absolutely know, because
    > they are required in nearly every J2EE project?
    >
    > And what are the parts that might not be required at all when
    > working on a J2EE project, so they still can be learned when
    > they are actually used, but do not have to be learned when
    > preparing general J2EE skills?


    Suggestion:

    A) all the Java web app stuff
    1) Servlet
    2) JSP
    3) EL
    4) taglibs
    5) JSTL
    6) JSF
    B) Java SE stuff that they may have missed
    7) JNDI
    8) JDBC with connection pools
    9) DI with Spring
    10) Hibernate
    C) alternatives
    11) Struts (alternative to JSF)
    12) Velocity (alternative to JSP)
    13) iBatis (alternative to Hibernate)
    D) EJB & JCA
    14) session beans
    15) message driven beans, JMS and message queues
    16) entity beans and JPA
    17) outbound JCA
    18) inbound JCA
    F) higher level
    19) portlets
    20) JCR

    There are no part that is part of all Java EE solutions. But top-down
    would be an order that makes sense to me.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Sep 3, 2008
    #3
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Herman
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    621
    Mark Shaw
    May 27, 2004
  2. Porky Pig Jr
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,113
    Fuzzyman
    May 12, 2004
  3. CoreyWhite
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    688
    JohnQ
    Mar 31, 2007
  4. Alexander
    Replies:
    20
    Views:
    1,083
    BGB / cr88192
    Sep 11, 2010
  5. nroberts

    Need to learn J2EE and friends

    nroberts, Sep 6, 2011, in forum: Java
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    611
    Arne Vajhøj
    Sep 7, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page