When someone from Britain speaks, Americans hear a "British accent"...

Discussion in 'Python' started by muldoon, Jun 28, 2005.

  1. muldoon

    muldoon Guest

    Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    and high intelligence. Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to
    represent their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    "American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?

    Be blunt. We Americans need to know. Should we try to change the way we
    speak? Are there certain words that sound particularly goofy? Please
    help us with your advice on this awkward matter.
     
    muldoon, Jun 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. muldoon

    BJ in Texas Guest

    muldoon <> wrote:
    || Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of
    || sophistication and high intelligence. Many companies hire
    || salespersons from Britain to represent their products,etc.
    || Question: When the British hear an "American accent," does it
    || sound unsophisticated and dumb?
    ||
    || Be blunt. We Americans need to know. Should we try to change
    || the way we speak? Are there certain words that sound
    || particularly goofy? Please help us with your advice on this
    || awkward matter.

    Which of the British accents?

    BJ
     
    BJ in Texas, Jun 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. On 2005-06-28, muldoon <> wrote:

    > Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    > and high intelligence.


    That depends on the accent. I believe that's probably true for
    the educated south of England, BBC, received pronunciation. I
    don't think that's true for some of the other dialects from
    northern areas (e.g. Liverpool) or the "cockney" accent.

    > Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to represent
    > their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    > "American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?


    I too have always wondered about this.

    > Be blunt. We Americans need to know. Should we try to change
    > the way we speak? Are there certain words that sound
    > particularly goofy? Please help us with your advice on this
    > awkward matter.




    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! Mr and Mrs PED, can
    at I borrow 26.7
    visi.com
     
    Grant Edwards, Jun 28, 2005
    #3
  4. muldoon wrote:
    > Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    > and high intelligence. Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to
    > represent their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    > "American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?
    >
    > Be blunt. We Americans need to know.


    To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python. Surely
    selecting the right forum to use indicates more sophistication and high
    intelligence than the way one speaks. ;-)
    --
    Michael Hoffman
     
    Michael Hoffman, Jun 28, 2005
    #4
  5. On 2005-06-28, Michael Hoffman <> wrote:
    > muldoon wrote:
    >> Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    >> and high intelligence. Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to
    >> represent their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    >> "American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?
    >>
    >> Be blunt. We Americans need to know.

    >
    > To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python.


    Monty Python was mostly Brits?

    > Surely selecting the right forum to use indicates more
    > sophistication and high intelligence than the way one speaks.
    > ;-)


    Well, there is that...

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! Hello... IRON
    at CURTAIN? Send over a
    visi.com SAUSAGE PIZZA! World War
    III? No thanks!
     
    Grant Edwards, Jun 28, 2005
    #5
  6. muldoon

    Jarek Zgoda Guest

    Grant Edwards napisa³(a):

    >>To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python.

    >
    > Monty Python was mostly Brits?


    Wasn't they all Brits?

    --
    Jarek Zgoda
    http://jpa.berlios.de/
     
    Jarek Zgoda, Jun 28, 2005
    #6
  7. muldoon

    Devan L Guest

    Thats like posting about Google here because the newsgroup is hosted on
    Google.
     
    Devan L, Jun 28, 2005
    #7
  8. muldoon

    muldoon Guest

    Michael Hoffman wrote:
    > muldoon wrote:
    > > Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    > > and high intelligence. Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to
    > > represent their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    > > "American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?
    > >
    > > Be blunt. We Americans need to know.

    >
    > To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python. Surely
    > selecting the right forum to use indicates more sophistication and high
    > intelligence than the way one speaks. ;-)
    > --
    > Michael Hoffman


    This is from California, not far from where they did the old atomic
    bomb tests. Be tolerant. Mutation you know.

    Now, what forum would you recommend? Any help would be appreciated.
     
    muldoon, Jun 28, 2005
    #8
  9. On 2005-06-28, Jarek Zgoda <> wrote:
    > Grant Edwards napisa³(a):
    >
    >>>To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python.

    >>
    >> Monty Python was mostly Brits?

    >
    > Wasn't they all Brits?


    Nope. Terry Gilliam was from Minneapolis.

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! RELAX!!... This
    at is gonna be a HEALING
    visi.com EXPERIENCE!! Besides,
    I work for DING DONGS!
     
    Grant Edwards, Jun 28, 2005
    #9
  10. muldoon

    Robert Kern Guest

    Re: When someone from Britain speaks, Americans hear a "Britishaccent"...

    muldoon wrote:

    > Now, what forum would you recommend? Any help would be appreciated.


    Not here. Beyond that, you're on your own.

    --
    Robert Kern


    "In the fields of hell where the grass grows high
    Are the graves of dreams allowed to die."
    -- Richard Harter
     
    Robert Kern, Jun 28, 2005
    #10
  11. On 2005-06-28, Devan L <> wrote:

    > Thats like posting about Google here because the newsgroup is hosted on
    > Google.


    Except the newsgroup isn't "hosted on Google", and it's far
    less interesting than Monty Python.

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! "THE LITTLE PINK
    at FLESH SISTERS," I saw them
    visi.com at th' FLUROESCENT BULB
    MAKERS CONVENTION...
     
    Grant Edwards, Jun 28, 2005
    #11
  12. muldoon

    Mike Holmans Guest

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 19:23:11 -0000, Grant Edwards <>
    tapped the keyboard and brought forth:

    >On 2005-06-28, muldoon <> wrote:
    >
    >> Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    >> and high intelligence.

    >
    >That depends on the accent. I believe that's probably true for
    >the educated south of England, BBC, received pronunciation. I
    >don't think that's true for some of the other dialects from
    >northern areas (e.g. Liverpool) or the "cockney" accent.
    >
    >> Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to represent
    >> their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    >> "American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?

    >
    >I too have always wondered about this.


    Since you've acknowledged that it's only the RP accent which gets that
    respect in the US (and since I speak it, I rather enjoy my visits
    across the pond) and others are either cute or obvious hicks, it
    shouldn't be a surprise that the same applies to the wide range of
    accents used by Americans.

    The strong Appalachian accent of the guide who took us round some
    caves in WV last year was the epitome of unsophistication - although
    what he said was extremely informative and delved into some advanced
    science.

    My wife's an Okie, but she speaks the US equivalent of RP - the one
    used by newsreaders on the main terrestrial TV networks and which is
    commonly thought to be used mostly in Ohio and other places just south
    of the Great Lakes. If there's such a thing as a standard "American
    accent", that's it. It neither sounds dumb nor clever - just American.

    Some of those sonorous slow talkers from the South, and majestic bass
    African-Americans like James Earl Jones or Morgan Freeman, have far
    more gravitas than any English accent can: to us, such people sound
    monumental.

    But most of the obviously regional accents in the US sound cute or
    picturesque, while the ones Americans tend to regard as hick accents
    just sound comical.

    The problem which a lot of fairly-midstream American accent users face
    is that it's the same sort of thing which Brits try and imitate when
    they want to suggest a snake-oil salesman. At bottom, an American
    accent doesn't mark someone out to a Brit as dumb or unsophisticated,
    but the immediate suspicion generated is that they're a phony and
    likely to be saying stuff without much regard for its accuracy.

    Cheers,

    Mike
     
    Mike Holmans, Jun 28, 2005
    #12
  13. muldoon

    Jarek Zgoda Guest

    Grant Edwards napisa³(a):

    >>>>To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python.
    >>>Monty Python was mostly Brits?

    >>
    >>Wasn't they all Brits?

    >
    > Nope. Terry Gilliam was from Minneapolis.


    Are you sure there are no Brits in Minneapolis?

    --
    Jarek Zgoda
    http://jpa.berlios.de/
     
    Jarek Zgoda, Jun 28, 2005
    #13
  14. muldoon wrote:
    > Michael Hoffman wrote:
    >>muldoon wrote:
    >>
    >>>Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    >>>and high intelligence. Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to
    >>>represent their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    >>>"American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?
    >>>
    >>>Be blunt. We Americans need to know.

    >>
    >>To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python. Surely
    >>selecting the right forum to use indicates more sophistication and high
    >>intelligence than the way one speaks. ;-)


    > This is from California, not far from where they did the old atomic
    > bomb tests. Be tolerant. Mutation you know.


    First you say "be blunt," now you say "be tolerant?" Make up your mind!

    ;-)
    --
    Michael Hoffman
     
    Michael Hoffman, Jun 28, 2005
    #14
  15. muldoon

    c d saunter Guest

    Michael Hoffman () wrote:
    : muldoon wrote:
    : > Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    : > and high intelligence. Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to
    : > represent their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    : > "American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?
    : >
    : > Be blunt. We Americans need to know.

    : To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python. Surely
    : selecting the right forum to use indicates more sophistication and high
    : intelligence than the way one speaks. ;-)

    Well you could draw a tenuous Python link on the headache inducing subject of
    trying to remember which spelling is which when doing
    something like:

    thirdparty_module_1.color = thirdparty_module_2.colour

    >>> from __future__ import sane_spelling :)


    cds
     
    c d saunter, Jun 28, 2005
    #15
  16. muldoon

    James Stroud Guest

    Re: When someone from Britain speaks,Americans hear a "British accent"...

    Frankly, I can't watch Shakespeare or movies like "the full monty" or
    "trainspotting" because I can't understand a damn word they say. British talk
    sounds like gibberish to me for the most part. Out of all of these movies,
    the only thing I ever could understand was something like "I've got the beast
    in my sights misses Pennymoney". Haaar! Wow, that's a good one.

    I think James Bond did it for Americans. He always wore a dinner jacket and
    played a lot of backarack--which is only cool because you have to bet a lot
    of money. Anyway, if you insist on making distinctions between the backwoods
    of apalachia and european aristocracy, I should remind you of the recessive
    genetic diseases that have historically plagued europe's nobility.



    On Tuesday 28 June 2005 11:27 am, muldoon wrote:
    > Americans consider having a "British accent" a sign of sophistication
    > and high intelligence. Many companies hire salespersons from Britain to
    > represent their products,etc. Question: When the British hear an
    > "American accent," does it sound unsophisticated and dumb?
    >
    > Be blunt. We Americans need to know. Should we try to change the way we
    > speak? Are there certain words that sound particularly goofy? Please
    > help us with your advice on this awkward matter.


    --
    James Stroud
    UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics
    Box 951570
    Los Angeles, CA 90095

    http://www.jamesstroud.com/
     
    James Stroud, Jun 28, 2005
    #16
  17. On 2005-06-28, Jarek Zgoda <> wrote:
    > Grant Edwards napisa³(a):
    >
    >>>>>To be blunt, I have no idea what this has to do with Python.
    >>>>Monty Python was mostly Brits?
    >>>
    >>>Wasn't they all Brits?

    >>
    >> Nope. Terry Gilliam was from Minneapolis.

    >
    > Are you sure there are no Brits in Minneapolis?


    There are plenty of Brit's in Minneapolis. My favorite radio
    DJ is one of them.

    Perhap's Gilliam has lived in Britain long enough to be
    considered a Brit, but he was born in Minneapolis, graduated
    from College in LA, and didn't move to Britain until he was
    something like 27. I believe he has British citizenship, so if
    that's the criterion, he's a Brit now. However, back when he
    was in Monty Python, he'd only lived in England for few years.

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! How's it going in
    at those MODULAR LOVE UNITS??
    visi.com
     
    Grant Edwards, Jun 29, 2005
    #17
  18. Mike Holmans wrote:

    > My wife's an Okie, but she speaks the US equivalent of RP - the one
    > used by newsreaders on the main terrestrial TV networks and which is
    > commonly thought to be used mostly in Ohio and other places just south
    > of the Great Lakes. If there's such a thing as a standard "American
    > accent", that's it. It neither sounds dumb nor clever - just American.


    The linguistic term for that accent, by the way, is General American.

    > The problem which a lot of fairly-midstream American accent users face
    > is that it's the same sort of thing which Brits try and imitate when
    > they want to suggest a snake-oil salesman.


    And due to overcorrection, typically do a really bad job of it :).

    --
    Erik Max Francis && && http://www.alcyone.com/max/
    San Jose, CA, USA && 37 20 N 121 53 W && AIM erikmaxfrancis
    If I had never met you / Surely I'd be someone else
    -- Anggun
     
    Erik Max Francis, Jun 29, 2005
    #18
  19. On 2005-06-28, James Stroud <> wrote:

    > I think James Bond did it for Americans. He always wore a
    > dinner jacket and played a lot of backarack--which is only
    > cool because you have to bet a lot of money. Anyway, if you
    > insist on making distinctions between the backwoods of
    > apalachia and european aristocracy,


    What, you think they sound the same?

    > I should remind you of the recessive genetic diseases that
    > have historically plagued europe's nobility.


    If don't think the English are willing to laugh at the
    nobility, you must not have seen the "Twit of the Year" skit or
    the election skit with what's-his-name (pronounced "mangrove
    throatwarbler").

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! I wonder if I should
    at put myself in ESCROW!!
    visi.com
     
    Grant Edwards, Jun 29, 2005
    #19
  20. On 2005-06-29, Erik Max Francis <> wrote:

    >> The problem which a lot of fairly-midstream American accent users face
    >> is that it's the same sort of thing which Brits try and imitate when
    >> they want to suggest a snake-oil salesman.

    >
    > And due to overcorrection, typically do a really bad job of it :).


    That reminds me of a character in one of the old Dr. Who
    series. I thought this character had some sort of speach
    impediment. After a few episodes I caught a few cultural
    allusions made by the character and it finally dawned on me the
    the character was supposed to be an _American_.

    I assume that when I try to speak with a British accent I sound
    just as bad to a Brit.

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! Why is everything
    at made of Lycra Spandex?
    visi.com
     
    Grant Edwards, Jun 29, 2005
    #20
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