Which GUI toolkit is THE best?

Discussion in 'Python' started by invitro81, Mar 10, 2006.

  1. invitro81

    invitro81 Guest

    Hello

    I've recently learnt python and I do love it! I congratulate all those
    geeks who produce this nice language; well, because I could be called a
    nearby newbee I've decided to improve my abilities by writing my own
    nice editor with python; so I've to choose among all those GUI toolkit's
    available there..

    But I've no idea which one I should use to start with.. I've read that
    tkinter seems to be the de facto standart in the pyhon community; but
    why? Is it the best available one or are theire other reasons? I read
    also a litte about wxpython and pygtk.. both are appealing to me but
    again to make a choice is difficult; is there also some guy liking pyqt
    is it worse or should it be avoided because of the licencing policy for
    qt (which I also like..)?

    * Which one is the most fun to program with?
    * Which one is the most easy to learn?
    * Which one looks best?
    * Which one is the most productive to program with?
     
    invitro81, Mar 10, 2006
    #1
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  2. invitro81

    Cell Guest

    invitro81 schreef:

    > Hello
    >
    > I've recently learnt python and I do love it! I congratulate all those
    > geeks who produce this nice language; well, because I could be called a
    > nearby newbee I've decided to improve my abilities by writing my own
    > nice editor with python; so I've to choose among all those GUI toolkit's
    > available there..
    >
    > But I've no idea which one I should use to start with.. I've read that
    > tkinter seems to be the de facto standart in the pyhon community; but
    > why? Is it the best available one or are theire other reasons? I read
    > also a litte about wxpython and pygtk.. both are appealing to me but
    > again to make a choice is difficult; is there also some guy liking pyqt
    > is it worse or should it be avoided because of the licencing policy for
    > qt (which I also like..)?
    >
    > * Which one is the most fun to program with?
    > * Which one is the most easy to learn?
    > * Which one looks best?
    > * Which one is the most productive to program with?


    Read this http://wxpython.org/quotes.php ;-)
     
    Cell, Mar 10, 2006
    #2
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  3. invitro81

    Peter Decker Guest

    On 3/10/06, invitro81 <> wrote:

    > But I've no idea which one I should use to start with.. I've read that
    > tkinter seems to be the de facto standart in the pyhon community; but
    > why? Is it the best available one or are theire other reasons? I read
    > also a litte about wxpython and pygtk.. both are appealing to me but
    > again to make a choice is difficult; is there also some guy liking pyqt
    > is it worse or should it be avoided because of the licencing policy for
    > qt (which I also like..)?
    >
    > * Which one is the most fun to program with?
    > * Which one is the most easy to learn?
    > * Which one looks best?
    > * Which one is the most productive to program with?


    GUI toolkits are not simple things to be productive with. Most people
    I know tried out a few briefly, found one that fit their needs and/or
    programming style better, and then adopted that as their choice. Given
    the complexity of GUIs in general, developers tend to be 'fluent' in
    one at a time - it's just too much to remember when switching between
    different kits.

    So most of the answers you get will invariably be tilted toward the
    choice that an individual made. Their reasons for that choice may not
    be the same as your reasons, so my advice to you would be to check
    them all out for a few hours apiece, and make a choice based on your
    impressions.

    Having said that, my choice for UI toolkit is wxPython, based on its
    use of native controls on all platforms. I disliked the syntax it
    inherited from wxWidgets, the C++ project it is based on, but then I
    found Dabo, whose UI layer wraps wxPython, giving you all the power
    and beauty of wxPython, with none of the ugliness.
    --

    # p.d.
     
    Peter Decker, Mar 10, 2006
    #3
  4. invitro81

    Eric Brunel Guest

    On Fri, 10 Mar 2006 13:36:18 +0100, invitro81 <> wrote:

    > Hello
    >
    > I've recently learnt python and I do love it! I congratulate all those
    > geeks who produce this nice language; well, because I could be called a
    > nearby newbee I've decided to improve my abilities by writing my own
    > nice editor with python; so I've to choose among all those GUI toolkit's
    > available there..
    >
    > But I've no idea which one I should use to start with.. I've read that
    > tkinter seems to be the de facto standart in the pyhon community; but
    > why? Is it the best available one or are theire other reasons? I read
    > also a litte about wxpython and pygtk.. both are appealing to me but
    > again to make a choice is difficult; is there also some guy liking pyqt
    > is it worse or should it be avoided because of the licencing policy for
    > qt (which I also like..)?
    >
    > * Which one is the most fun to program with?
    > * Which one is the most easy to learn?
    > * Which one looks best?
    > * Which one is the most productive to program with?


    It all depends on what features are the most important for you. Here is
    some help to answer the question yourself:
    http://www.awaretek.com/toolkits.html

    HTH
    --
    python -c "print ''.join([chr(154 - ord(c)) for c in
    'U(17zX(%,5.zmz5(17;8(%,5.Z65\'*9--56l7+-'])"
     
    Eric Brunel, Mar 10, 2006
    #4
  5. Am Fri, 10 Mar 2006 13:36:18 +0100 schrieb invitro81:

    > Hello
    >
    > I've recently learnt python and I do love it! I congratulate all those
    > geeks who produce this nice language; well, because I could be called a
    > nearby newbee I've decided to improve my abilities by writing my own
    > nice editor with python; so I've to choose among all those GUI toolkit's
    > available there..
    >
    > But I've no idea which one I should use to start with.. I've read that
    > tkinter seems to be the de facto standart in the pyhon community; but
    > why?


    No, tkinter is not the standard. It is justed part of the standard
    library.

    Here is what I think:

    tkinter (or better TK) has no good table widget.

    The licence for QT is GPL, this means you cannot use it in commercial
    application. That is why I never looked at it.

    wx is better than tkinter. But it is big and there are too many
    layers: WxPython -> WxWidgets -> gtk
    I tried some examples, but it didn't "feel" good.

    Now I use pygtk. I code everything, I don't used glade or something
    like this.

    HTH,
    Thomas

    --
    Thomas Güttler, http://www.thomas-guettler.de/
    E-Mail: guettli (*) thomas-guettler + de
    Spam Catcher:
     
    Thomas Guettler, Mar 10, 2006
    #5
  6. Thomas Guettler enlightened us with:
    > The licence for QT is GPL, this means you cannot use it in
    > commercial application. That is why I never looked at it.


    Ehmm... from their website:

    The Qt Commercial License is the correct license to use for the
    construction of proprietary, commercial software. The license allows
    you to:
    - Build commercial software and software whose source code you
    wish to keep private.
    - Freely choose licensing for the software you are writing
    (Proprietary, Open Source or both).
    - Be able to gain access to Qt Solutions, Trolltech support and
    commercial-only Qt components such as commercial database
    drivers and the Visual Studio Integration on Windows.

    Sybren
    --
    The problem with the world is stupidity. Not saying there should be a
    capital punishment for stupidity, but why don't we just take the
    safety labels off of everything and let the problem solve itself?
    Frank Zappa
     
    Sybren Stuvel, Mar 10, 2006
    #6
  7. Bear not false witness (was: Which GUI toolkit is THE best?)

    In article <>,
    Thomas Guettler <> wrote:
    .
    .
    .
    >tkinter (or better TK) has no good table widget.

    .
    .
    .
    <URL: http://tkinter.unpythonic.net/wiki/TkTable >

    There are others, even, if that matters.
     
    Cameron Laird, Mar 10, 2006
    #7
  8. invitro81 on comp.lang.python said:

    > again to make a choice is difficult; is there also some guy liking pyqt
    > is it worse or should it be avoided because of the licencing policy for
    > qt (which I also like..)?
    >
    > * Which one is the most fun to program with?
    > * Which one is the most easy to learn?
    > * Which one looks best?
    > * Which one is the most productive to program with?


    Those are all hard questions. You might as well have asked 'which is the
    best web framework'. It's not easy to tell ^_^ It highly depends on which
    tasks you're aiming at.

    wxPython is a pretty good 'all-round' and cross-platform library, and
    includes some non-graphical features. It's got a drawback: it's a wrapper
    for the wxwidgets library, and hence it's not very pythonic; you can solve
    part of its unpythonicness using wax, which is not very well documented at
    the time. wxGlade can be used to design GUI apps with little effort.

    pyGTK works well, too. Recent versions perform well and are good looking on
    Windows systems as well as Linux and Macs (if you provide an X server).
    It's very well documented (better than wxPython, in my opinion) and its
    license is quite permissive. It's unpythonic just like wxPython. Glade and
    Gazpacho can be used to design GUI apps in a visual way.

    pyGUI is a pyGTK-based graphic library which is designed from scratch to be
    pythonic. It seems very, very promising but I can't tell you if it's
    production-stable since I've tested it just a couple of times. It may be
    the funniest and more productive toolkit ever.

    FLTK was interesting but seems to lack maintenance and support, pyQT is a
    bit 'unfree' for most uses. Tkinter is quite old stuff.

    --
    Alan Franzoni <>
    -
    Togli .xyz dalla mia email per contattarmi.
    Rremove .xyz from my address in order to contact me.
    -
    GPG Key Fingerprint:
    5C77 9DC3 BD5B 3A28 E7BC 921A 0255 42AA FE06 8F3E
     
    Alan Franzoni, Mar 10, 2006
    #8
  9. invitro81

    David Boddie Guest

    Alan Franzoni wrote:

    > FLTK was interesting but seems to lack maintenance and support,


    Looking at the News section of the project's home page, I can see
    that updates were few and far between in 2004 and 2005, but the
    action seems to have picked up again since:

    http://pyfltk.sourceforge.net/#news

    > pyQT is a bit 'unfree' for most uses.


    "Unfree" as in the opposite of freedom, or "unfree" as in the price of
    beer?

    PyQt for Qt 3 is available under the GNU General Public License on
    Mac OS X and Linux. Since Qt 4 can be used under the GPL on all
    platforms, you'll even be able to write software on Windows with PyQt4
    that's licensed under a GPL-compatible license.

    FAQ: http://www.riverbankcomputing.co.uk/pyqt/faq.php
    Roadmap: http://www.riverbankcomputing.co.uk/pyqt/roadmap.php

    > Tkinter is quite old stuff.


    But actively supported and promoted:

    http://wiki.python.org/moin/TkInter

    And I'm sure there are plenty of other solutions that deserve to be
    mentioned:

    http://wiki.python.org/moin/GuiProgramming

    David
     
    David Boddie, Mar 11, 2006
    #9
  10. On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 00:07:52 +0100
    Alan Franzoni <> wrote:
    > > again to make a choice is difficult; is there also some guy liking
    > > pyqt is it worse or should it be avoided because of the licencing
    > > policy for qt (which I also like..)?
    > >
    > > * Which one is the most fun to program with?
    > > * Which one is the most easy to learn?
    > > * Which one looks best?
    > > * Which one is the most productive to program with?

    >
    > wxPython is a pretty good 'all-round' and cross-platform library, and
    > includes some non-graphical features. It's got a drawback: it's a
    > wrapper for the wxwidgets library, and hence it's not very pythonic;
    > you can solve part of its unpythonicness using wax, which is not very
    > well documented at the time. wxGlade can be used to design GUI apps
    > with little effort.
    >
    > pyGTK works well, too. Recent versions perform well and are good
    > looking on Windows systems as well as Linux and Macs (if you provide
    > an X server). It's very well documented (better than wxPython, in my
    > opinion) and its license is quite permissive. It's unpythonic just
    > like wxPython. Glade and Gazpacho can be used to design GUI apps in a
    > visual way.


    I'll throw my two cents in here now.

    I've used both wxPython and PyGTK. I find wxPython to be horribly
    un-pythonic; combining that some problems on the Mac, and some
    other installation/environment issues, I ditched it for PyGTK.

    I find PyGTK to be very natural, and actually highly Pythonic. So much
    of its design just makes sense. And GTK provides a lot of nice things,
    and is itself incredibly versitle (the places you can put odd
    widgets...). I've found myself to be more productive with GTK (both
    PyGTK and GTKmm) than with any other system I've used (with the
    possible exception of web interfaces).

    - Michael

    --
    mouse, n: a device for pointing at the xterm in which you want to type.
    -- Fortune
     
    Michael Ekstrand, Mar 12, 2006
    #10
  11. invitro81

    Roger Binns Guest

    "invitro81" <> wrote in message news:441172c2$...
    > But I've no idea which one I should use to start with..


    One thing you'll need to carefully decide is where you want
    to end up. The different toolkits have different limits on
    where you can go. A simple example is printing. Some don't
    support it (eg Tkinter didn't 5 years ago when I last used it).
    If you will never need to print then that won't matter.
    Generally what you'll find is that the toolkits that let
    you do more are harder to get started with because you have
    to code in such a way as to let the more complicated features
    (eg printing) work, and the documentation is bigger because
    there is more to document.

    These are some of those areas to consider:

    Printing

    Can you print? Does the user get to use their operating
    system specific dialog boxes to choose printers etc?
    As a developer can you find out if the printer is colour
    or black and white? What about the paper size?

    HTML

    Does the toolkit have a way for you to display HTML? How
    complicated can the HTML be (eg CSS)? Can you embed widgets
    in the HTML?

    Threading

    Do you have to confine gui operations to one thread? How do
    you send a message from a worker thread to the gui thread
    (the gui thread will block in an event loop - that event loop
    needs to be able to be woken up from other threads)

    Native look and feel

    Will your users expect a native looking application? Will they
    want drag and drop? Do they expect rich objects on the keyboard?
    Is the toolkit available for all platforms you would want to
    run on (Windows, Linux, Mac, BSD etc) and their variations
    (different processors, 32 and 64 bit runtimes)?

    OLE

    Can you display other applications as a widget within yours?
    What about the other way round? Can you script other applications?
    (Python actually has the latter available on many platforms without
    the need for the gui toolkit to so)

    i18n/l10n

    Does the toolkit support Unicode? How easy is it to use with
    multiple languages?

    Additional packages

    What additional packages are there for the toolkit? For example
    Pmw provides more widgets to tkinter and their are GL packages
    for the various toolkits. If you are going to do graphics heavy
    stuff you'll want some way of hooking the toolkit with PIL.

    There should be some sort of demo available. wxPython has a fantastic
    one showing every single widget with code you edit to see what effect
    it has.

    The documentation should be good as well. Pick a random question such
    as "how do I delete all entries in a listbox begining with 'foo'" and
    see if you can work it out from the documentation.

    There should also be some sort of mailing list and user forums. Look
    for helpful answers being given with people being polite.

    What I would suggest you do is write a simple application in two or
    three different toolkits (eg convert temperature between F and C).
    You'll learn various ways of dealing with widget placement and sizers.
    (ie what happens if the user makes the containing window larger or
    smaller). My suggestions are to try PyGame, Tkinter and wxPython.
    You'll be better off having learned lessons from all 3 than just
    using one.

    The piece of good news is that to my knowledge applications written
    using any of the toolkits can be packaged up using tools like
    py2exe/py2app/cx_Freeze so that you can redistribute them to other
    users and those users will not have to know or care that you used
    Python and whatever toolkit.

    Roger
     
    Roger Binns, Mar 12, 2006
    #11
  12. invitro81

    invitro81 Guest

    You guys are great :) thanx for the plenty answers and suggestions; I've
    made my search through a little more and decided to start coding the
    same app first with pygtk and second with wxpython.. and perhaps later
    with pyqt.
     
    invitro81, Mar 12, 2006
    #12
  13. Am Fri, 10 Mar 2006 16:10:09 +0100 schrieb Sybren Stuvel:

    > Thomas Guettler enlightened us with:
    >> The licence for QT is GPL, this means you cannot use it in
    >> commercial application. That is why I never looked at it.

    >
    > Ehmm... from their website:


    From http://www.trolltech.com/products/qt/licensing.html

    > The Qt Commercial License is the correct license to use for the
    > construction of proprietary, commercial software. The license allows
    > you to:
    > - Build commercial software and software whose source code you
    > wish to keep private.
    > - Freely choose licensing for the software you are writing
    > (Proprietary, Open Source or both).
    > - Be able to gain access to Qt Solutions, Trolltech support and
    > commercial-only Qt components such as commercial database
    > drivers and the Visual Studio Integration on Windows.


    Have you read all the text?

    """
    Two qualities of the Qt Commercial License should be emphasized:

    You need it before you start development of proprietary software.

    You must purchase a Qt Commercial License from Trolltech or from any of
    its authorized resellers before you start developing. The Commercial
    license does not allow the incorporation of code developed with the Open
    Source Edition of Qt into a proprietary product.
    """

    There is a GPL version for Linux. But the GPL does not allow linking
    with closed source software.


    --
    Thomas Güttler, http://www.thomas-guettler.de/
    E-Mail: guettli (*) thomas-guettler + de
    Spam Catcher:
     
    Thomas Guettler, Mar 13, 2006
    #13
  14. Thomas Guettler enlightened us with:
    > There is a GPL version for Linux. But the GPL does not allow linking
    > with closed source software.


    The availability of a GPL license does not negate the availability of
    a commercial license. You can write commercial, closed source software
    on Linux using Qt legally.

    Sybren
    --
    The problem with the world is stupidity. Not saying there should be a
    capital punishment for stupidity, but why don't we just take the
    safety labels off of everything and let the problem solve itself?
    Frank Zappa
     
    Sybren Stuvel, Mar 13, 2006
    #14
  15. invitro81

    Paul Boddie Guest

    Thomas Guettler wrote:
    >
    > Have you read all the text?
    >
    > """
    > Two qualities of the Qt Commercial License should be emphasized:
    >
    > You need it before you start development of proprietary software.
    >
    > You must purchase a Qt Commercial License from Trolltech or from any of
    > its authorized resellers before you start developing. The Commercial
    > license does not allow the incorporation of code developed with the Open
    > Source Edition of Qt into a proprietary product.
    > """
    >
    > There is a GPL version for Linux. But the GPL does not allow linking
    > with closed source software.


    My understanding of how it all works is this: Trolltech offers you Qt
    under the GPL; you can choose to accept the GPL; you then uphold the
    GPL in the distribution of your work. Alternatively, you request that
    Trolltech license the software to you under the "Qt Commercial
    License"; they decide whether or not they want to license it to you; if
    they decide "yes", you get to distribute your proprietary software with
    the proprietary edition of the product.

    What people don't usually understand (or rather complain about loudly)
    is that Trolltech can refuse to license Qt to you under the commercial
    licence, as is their right as the owner of the copyrighted work. As far
    as I know, you can still obtain Qt under the GPL from them in such a
    situation, although this is fairly academic since there are lots of
    people offering Qt under the GPL in a variety of GNU/Linux
    distributions, for example. Usually, the people making a fuss about all
    this have already licensed Qt under the GPL, however, and believe that
    they have a right to "switch over" to another licence, but neither the
    GPL nor any basic aspect of copyright practice supports such a notion.

    So, yes, you either say up front that you're developing proprietary
    software and buy into that special deal with the copyright holder, or
    you don't. Of course, you could try and distribute non-commercial,
    evaluation, trial, educational-use-only, non-redistributable or
    NDA-affected versions of your favourite proprietary software products
    and see which court of law that takes you to - in these debates nobody
    seems to ask themselves whether Bill Gates and/or Steve Jobs would let
    you switch around, slip out of that NDA, give you special upgrades,
    strike through clauses in that EULA, and so on down the list of things
    that nobody thought about when putting together that now-shaky business
    model.

    Paul
     
    Paul Boddie, Mar 13, 2006
    #15
  16. invitro81

    Paul Rubin Guest

    "Paul Boddie" <> writes:
    > What people don't usually understand (or rather complain about loudly)
    > is that Trolltech can refuse to license Qt to you under the commercial
    > licence, as is their right as the owner of the copyrighted work.


    What is the deal here? Why would they refuse, to someone willing to
    pay the commercial license fee? They are a business, and as such,
    they presumably like gettng money. And someone wanting to develop a
    proprietary app with Qt that users have to pay for, shouldn't mind
    paying Trolltech for the commercial Qt license.
     
    Paul Rubin, Mar 13, 2006
    #16
  17. invitro81

    Chris Mellon Guest

    On 13 Mar 2006 10:19:05 -0800, Paul Rubin
    <"http://phr.cx"@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    > "Paul Boddie" <> writes:
    > > What people don't usually understand (or rather complain about loudly)
    > > is that Trolltech can refuse to license Qt to you under the commercial
    > > licence, as is their right as the owner of the copyrighted work.

    >
    > What is the deal here? Why would they refuse, to someone willing to
    > pay the commercial license fee? They are a business, and as such,
    > they presumably like gettng money. And someone wanting to develop a
    > proprietary app with Qt that users have to pay for, shouldn't mind
    > paying Trolltech for the commercial Qt license.
    > --


    Qt (commercial) licensing is a subscription - you pay per developer
    per year - so an obvious thing for people to attempt (and I have no
    idea if this has been tried, but I wouldn't doubt it) is for a company
    to download the GPL version, develop the application internally, and
    then purchase 1 license when they're ready to ship. This would
    seriously bite into TTs income and they aren't interested in allowing
    you do this, so while you're free to download the GPL version and
    develop all you want, TT won't sell you a commercial license "after
    the fact" like this.

    > http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    >
     
    Chris Mellon, Mar 13, 2006
    #17
  18. invitro81

    Paul Boddie Guest

    Paul Rubin wrote:
    > "Paul Boddie" <> writes:
    > > What people don't usually understand (or rather complain about loudly)
    > > is that Trolltech can refuse to license Qt to you under the commercial
    > > licence, as is their right as the owner of the copyrighted work.

    >
    > What is the deal here? Why would they refuse, to someone willing to
    > pay the commercial license fee? They are a business, and as such,


    Well, I can't answer for them in any sense (and I should ask you to
    substitute any company with a similar business model for Trolltech in
    the text, along with accompanying product names, in order to emphasize
    the mere speculative nature of my explanation), but all I was trying to
    do was to explain the pattern of behaviour that goes something like
    this:

    1. Developer downloads Qt GPL edition.
    2. Developer develops product based on Qt.
    3. Some time later, with finished product, developer now wants
    to release a closed source version of the product.
    4. Developer approaches Trolltech and asks for a commercial
    licence in order to ship a closed source product.

    Now, since the commercial licence is "per developer", some cunning
    outfit could claim that only one developer wrote their product (rather
    than one hundred developers, say), but this would be a fairly big
    breach of trust (although nothing unusual in the world of commerce, I'm
    sure). Would a business making software for other such businesses care
    about such things? What kind of recourse would they have?

    > they presumably like gettng money. And someone wanting to develop a
    > proprietary app with Qt that users have to pay for, shouldn't mind
    > paying Trolltech for the commercial Qt license.


    It's the "after the fact" switching from GPL to commercial licensing,
    rather than the up-front "wanting to develop" scenario, that would be
    difficult for anyone issuing commercial licences to monitor. Trolltech
    specifically mention "exposure to the GPL" on their "open source
    downloads" page presumably (and again I speculate, so beware!) to
    suggest that if you want to end commercial, you need to start
    commercial:

    http://www.trolltech.com/download/opensource.html

    I don't see why anyone planning to make big bucks on proprietary
    software can't shell out for the technology which would make their
    success possible, either. But anyway, the key part of my explanation
    was that the copyright holder can always refuse to license their work
    to you. Obviously, if they've already licensed it to you under the GPL,
    you'll always have that kind of permission.

    Paul
     
    Paul Boddie, Mar 13, 2006
    #18
  19. invitro81

    ahart Guest

    i'm pretty much a newbie, too, and have been dabbling with some gui
    tools

    so far, i like pythoncard pretty well

    it wraps wxpython and seems to be pretty easy to use
     
    ahart, Mar 13, 2006
    #19
  20. Op 2006-03-13, Paul Boddie schreef <>:
    > Paul Rubin wrote:
    >> "Paul Boddie" <> writes:
    >> > What people don't usually understand (or rather complain about loudly)
    >> > is that Trolltech can refuse to license Qt to you under the commercial
    >> > licence, as is their right as the owner of the copyrighted work.

    >>
    >> What is the deal here? Why would they refuse, to someone willing to
    >> pay the commercial license fee? They are a business, and as such,

    >
    > Well, I can't answer for them in any sense (and I should ask you to
    > substitute any company with a similar business model for Trolltech in
    > the text, along with accompanying product names, in order to emphasize
    > the mere speculative nature of my explanation), but all I was trying to
    > do was to explain the pattern of behaviour that goes something like
    > this:
    >
    > 1. Developer downloads Qt GPL edition.
    > 2. Developer develops product based on Qt.
    > 3. Some time later, with finished product, developer now wants
    > to release a closed source version of the product.
    > 4. Developer approaches Trolltech and asks for a commercial
    > licence in order to ship a closed source product.
    >
    > Now, since the commercial licence is "per developer", some cunning
    > outfit could claim that only one developer wrote their product (rather
    > than one hundred developers, say), but this would be a fairly big
    > breach of trust (although nothing unusual in the world of commerce, I'm
    > sure). Would a business making software for other such businesses care
    > about such things? What kind of recourse would they have?


    I wonder what this "per developer" means. Suppose ten people are working
    on a product. But only one person is working on the GUI and comes into
    contact with the Qt widget. Is that one or ten developers that are
    counted for the license?

    --
    Antoon Pardon
     
    Antoon Pardon, Mar 14, 2006
    #20
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