Which requests cause a w3wp process to grow considerably?

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Nick, Oct 26, 2009.

  1. Nick

    Nick Guest

    On a production environment, how can one discover which Asp.Net http
    requests, whether aspx or asmx or custom, are causing the most memory
    pressure within a w3wp.exe process? I don't mean memory leaks here. It's a
    good healthy application that disposes all it's objects nicely. Microsoft's
    generational GC does it's work fine. Some requests however, cause the w3wp
    process to grow its memory footprint considerably, but only for the duration
    of the request.

    It is simply a question of the cost-efficiency and scalability of a
    production environment for a SAAS app, in order to regularly report back to
    the development department on their most memory hogging "pages", to return
    that (memory) pressure where it belongs, so to speak.

    There doesn't seem to be anything like:
    HttpContext.Request.PeakPrivateBytes or .CurrentPrivateBytes
    or
    Session.PeakPrivateBytes
     
    Nick, Oct 26, 2009
    #1
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  2. Nick

    Mr. Arnold Guest

    "Nick" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On a production environment, how can one discover which Asp.Net http
    > requests, whether aspx or asmx or custom, are causing the most memory
    > pressure within a w3wp.exe process? I don't mean memory leaks here. It's a
    > good healthy application that disposes all it's objects nicely.
    > Microsoft's
    > generational GC does it's work fine. Some requests however, cause the w3wp
    > process to grow its memory footprint considerably, but only for the
    > duration
    > of the request.
    >
    > It is simply a question of the cost-efficiency and scalability of a
    > production environment for a SAAS app, in order to regularly report back
    > to
    > the development department on their most memory hogging "pages", to return
    > that (memory) pressure where it belongs, so to speak.
    >
    > There doesn't seem to be anything like:
    > HttpContext.Request.PeakPrivateBytes or .CurrentPrivateBytes
    > or
    > Session.PeakPrivateBytes
    >


    I have used Process Explorer to look at things concerning the ASP.NET worker
    process.

    http://dotnetperls.com/process-explorer


    __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 4545 (20091026) __________

    The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

    http://www.eset.com
     
    Mr. Arnold, Oct 27, 2009
    #2
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  3. Nick

    Nick Guest

    Thanks for your reply. I'm familiar with Process Explorer but it doesn't give
    the info I need. I think actually that my question is a perfectly legitimate
    one from a sysadmin's point of view on scalabity and cost efficiency. It
    would fit in this series of questions:

    - which non-cached page reponses are cacheable?
    - which pages consume the most cpu?
    - which pages consume the most memory?
    - which pages take the longest to serve?

    Some of these are easily answered, i.e. the IIS log (with logparser) gives a
    quick answer to which take the longest.
    But it looks like nobody has an answer on the question of memory consumption
    and that Microsoft hasn't yet given this thought.

    Nick

    "Mr. Arnold" wrote:

    >
    > "Nick" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > On a production environment, how can one discover which Asp.Net http
    > > requests, whether aspx or asmx or custom, are causing the most memory
    > > pressure within a w3wp.exe process? I don't mean memory leaks here. It's a
    > > good healthy application that disposes all it's objects nicely.
    > > Microsoft's
    > > generational GC does it's work fine. Some requests however, cause the w3wp
    > > process to grow its memory footprint considerably, but only for the
    > > duration
    > > of the request.
    > >
    > > It is simply a question of the cost-efficiency and scalability of a
    > > production environment for a SAAS app, in order to regularly report back
    > > to
    > > the development department on their most memory hogging "pages", to return
    > > that (memory) pressure where it belongs, so to speak.
    > >
    > > There doesn't seem to be anything like:
    > > HttpContext.Request.PeakPrivateBytes or .CurrentPrivateBytes
    > > or
    > > Session.PeakPrivateBytes
    > >

    >
    > I have used Process Explorer to look at things concerning the ASP.NET worker
    > process.
    >
    > http://dotnetperls.com/process-explorer
    >
    >
    > __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 4545 (20091026) __________
    >
    > The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.
    >
    > http://www.eset.com
    >
    >
    >
    > .
    >
     
    Nick, Oct 27, 2009
    #3
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