why did you choose the programming language(s)you currently use?

Discussion in 'Python' started by Deep_Feelings, Jul 14, 2009.

  1. So you have chosen programming language "x" so shall you tell us why
    you did so , and what negatives or positives it has ?
     
    Deep_Feelings, Jul 14, 2009
    #1
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  2. Deep_Feelings

    MRAB Guest

    Deep_Feelings wrote:
    > So you have chosen programming language "x" so shall you tell us why
    > you did so , and what negatives or positives it has ?


    I've heard of "C" and "D", but not "x", unless you mean XPL (X
    Programming Language) or PLAN-X. :)
     
    MRAB, Jul 14, 2009
    #2
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  3. Deep_Feelings

    Mensanator Guest

    On Jul 14, 10:55 am, Deep_Feelings <> wrote:
    > So you have chosen programming language "x" so shall you tell us why
    > you did so , and  what negatives or positives it has ?


    language must have

    - unlimited precision integers
    - easy to program
    - IDE not required
    - reasonable speed
    - math library needs to include number theoretic functions
    like GCD, LCM, Modular Inverse, etc.
    - not fucking retarded like F#

    That leaves Python (along with gympy, the Python wrapper for
    the GMP library, which could be used with C or C++ if it weren't
    for the ease of use issue) as the obvious choice.

    As for negatives, the GMP library doesn't factor.

    As for positives, you can call a factoring program from Python
    and capture the output (and have it correct the bug in the factoring
    program without having to fix the factoring program).
     
    Mensanator, Jul 14, 2009
    #3
  4. Deep_Feelings wrote:
    > So you have chosen programming language "x" so shall you tell us why
    > you did so , and what negatives or positives it has ?


    Java, pays a living.

    *duck*

    Stefan
     
    Stefan Behnel, Jul 14, 2009
    #4
  5. Deep_Feelings

    Paul Rubin Guest

    Mensanator <> writes:
    > - unlimited precision integers
    > - easy to program
    > - IDE not required
    > - reasonable speed
    > - math library needs to include number theoretic functions
    > like GCD, LCM, Modular Inverse, etc.
    > - not fucking retarded like F#


    Have you looked at Haskell?

    > As for negatives, the GMP library doesn't factor.


    Maybe with some MIRACL bindings...
     
    Paul Rubin, Jul 14, 2009
    #5
  6. Deep_Feelings

    Aahz Guest

    In article <4a5ccdd6$0$32679$-online.net>,
    Stefan Behnel <> wrote:
    >Deep_Feelings wrote:
    >>
    >> So you have chosen programming language "x" so shall you tell us why
    >> you did so , and what negatives or positives it has ?

    >
    >*duck*


    Where do you get the duck programming language?
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    "If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait
    until you hire an amateur." --Red Adair
     
    Aahz, Jul 14, 2009
    #6
  7. Deep_Feelings

    Nobody Guest

    On Tue, 14 Jul 2009 11:47:08 -0700, Paul Rubin wrote:

    >> - unlimited precision integers
    >> - easy to program
    >> - IDE not required
    >> - reasonable speed
    >> - math library needs to include number theoretic functions
    >> like GCD, LCM, Modular Inverse, etc.
    >> - not fucking retarded like F#

    >
    > Have you looked at Haskell?


    Given his comment about F#, I have a suspicion that he might be
    dogmatically opposed to functional languages generally.
     
    Nobody, Jul 14, 2009
    #7
  8. Deep_Feelings

    greg Guest

    greg, Jul 15, 2009
    #8
  9. Deep_Feelings

    Chris Rebert Guest

    Chris Rebert, Jul 15, 2009
    #9
  10. Deep_Feelings

    Che M Guest

    On Jul 14, 11:55 am, Deep_Feelings <> wrote:
    > So you have chosen programming language "x" so shall you tell us why
    > you did so , and  what negatives or positives it has ?


    As a hobbyist--and not a real programmer*--I think I chose Python
    (I don't really recall now) because of things like:

    - There is a good community, including tutor list, etc.
    - I wanted something that would run cross-platform (so no Visual
    Basic).
    - Preferred something free (so no REALBasic).
    - I wanted a high level language.
    - It seemed easiest to read and learn. I like mandatory indents, for
    example.
    - There are a lot of libraries for it with good support.
    - I liked the Zen of Python philosophy (to the extent I understood
    it).
    - Some high profile entities were using it, so it must have something
    going for it.
    - It was new enough to be a possible improvement over older languages
    while old enough to be established.
    - Who can't like a computer language named Python?

    Drawbacks:

    - AFAIK, running multiple Python apps all show up in the Windows task
    manager as
    "python.exe" (common to all non-compiled languages?) instead of the
    app's name.
    - Distributing as an executable is not as straightforward as I might
    hope.
    - I wish Python 3 wouldn't break my 2.5 code.
    - If it could be quicker (compiled), that would be better. (But
    haven't tried
    psyco or Shed Skin, etc.)
    - I've found understanding web programming hard, but that might be
    just the
    nature of web programming and not a Python thing.
    - I wish wxPython had a more complete rich text editor (but overall it
    is great).

    CM
     
    Che M, Jul 15, 2009
    #10
  11. Deep_Feelings

    Mensanator Guest

    On Jul 14, 1:47�pm, Paul Rubin <http://> wrote:
    > Mensanator <> writes:
    > > - unlimited precision integers
    > > - easy to program
    > > - IDE not required
    > > - reasonable speed
    > > - math library needs to include number theoretic functions
    > > � like GCD, LCM, Modular Inverse, etc.
    > > - not fucking retarded like F#

    >
    > Have you looked at Haskell?
    >
    > > As for negatives, the GMP library doesn't factor.

    >
    > Maybe with some MIRACL bindings...


    That's the factoring program (factor.exe from
    the MIRACL package) I made reference to.

    I don't know how to fix the bug nor how to bind
    it to Python.

    What I do (or did at one time) know is how figure
    out how to recompile it, change the output to be
    database compatible, consistent messages rather
    than such useless messages as "this number is prime".

    The Python program, as it captures the StdOut,
    can watch for the bug. The bug is that factor.exe
    occasionally gets stuck on a composite while deep
    into the factoring process. Sometimes, however,
    this getting stuck can be resolved if you send the
    composite back to the beginning and start over.
    The factor.exe program isn't smart enough to try
    this, it simply returns COMPOSITE amongst the
    PRIME_FACTORS. The calling Python program can then
    collect the unfactored composites and call factor.exe
    again with each of them sending them back to the
    start of the factoring. If they successfully factor
    on the second pass, Python then appends them to
    the factors from the first pass to achieve a complete
    factorization that factor.exe can produce in theory
    but not in practice.
     
    Mensanator, Jul 15, 2009
    #11
  12. Deep_Feelings

    Mensanator Guest

    On Jul 14, 4:58�pm, Nobody <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 14 Jul 2009 11:47:08 -0700, Paul Rubin wrote:
    > >> - unlimited precision integers
    > >> - easy to program
    > >> - IDE not required
    > >> - reasonable speed
    > >> - math library needs to include number theoretic functions
    > >> � like GCD, LCM, Modular Inverse, etc.
    > >> - not fucking retarded like F#

    >
    > > Have you looked at Haskell?

    >
    > Given his comment about F#, I have a suspicion that he might be
    > dogmatically opposed to functional languages generally.


    Not dogmatically opposed, I installed it because
    I actually wanted to try functional progrsmming.
    My mistake was listening to that Harrop dude who
    didn't bother to explain that F# is part of a
    government program that provides jobs for retards.

    To wit: F# has a rational data type, that's cool.
    But wait, F# has TWO rational data types. Huh?
    Well, after they made the first, some jackass
    came up with a second type that stores data more
    efficiently.

    And, of course, the second type doesn't have the
    same functionality as the first, so you need both.

    And of the myriad data type converion methods, guess
    which possible conversion methods are conspicuous
    by their absense? That's right, type1 <==> type2
    rational conversions don't exist.

    At that point, I decided I wasn't going to put up
    crap like that and threw it away.
     
    Mensanator, Jul 15, 2009
    #12
  13. Deep_Feelings

    Paul Moore Guest

    2009/7/15 Scott David Daniels <>:
    > Aahz wrote:
    >>
    >> In article <4a5ccdd6$0$32679$-online.net>,
    >> Stefan Behnel  <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Deep_Feelings wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> So you have chosen programming language "x" so shall you tell us why
    >>>> you did so , and  what negatives or positives it has ?
    >>>
    >>> *duck*

    >>
    >> Where do you get the duck programming language?

    >
    > It shares a type system with Python, of course.  :)


    No, it just has a type system with all the same operations as Python,
    which all do the same things. :)

    Paul.
     
    Paul Moore, Jul 15, 2009
    #13
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