Why does a test fail when I predicted it's exception class?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Richard, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Hi,

    I have a test suite that invokes on test set that specifies

    assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError, MyCalc.new.calc)

    When I run the test suite, instead of "1 test, 0 failures, 0 errors",
    I get the following. The code follows this output.

    What's up?
    Richard

    K:\_Projects\Ruby\TestUnitTesting\BasicTest>ruby MyCalcTest.rb
    ..\BasicCalc.rb:5:in `/': divided by 0 (ZeroDivisionError)
    from .\BasicCalc.rb:5:in `calc'
    from .\BasicCalc.rb:9
    from
    K:/_Utilities/Ruby_1.8.2-15/ruby/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/rubygems/custom_require.rb:27:in
    `gem_original_require'
    from
    K:/_Utilities/Ruby_1.8.2-15/ruby/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/rubygems/custom_require.rb:27:in
    `require'
    from ./tc_TestSet.rb:1
    from
    K:/_Utilities/Ruby_1.8.2-15/ruby/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/rubygems/custom_require.rb:27:in
    `gem_original_require'
    from
    K:/_Utilities/Ruby_1.8.2-15/ruby/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/rubygems/custom_require.rb:27:in
    `require'
    from MyCalcTest.rb:4

    BasicCalc.rb
    =========
    # BasicCalc.rb

    class MyCalc
    def calc
    2/0
    end
    end

    tc_TestSet.rb
    ==========
    require '.\BasicCalc.rb'

    class Test1 < Test::Unit::TestCase # The long-winded way
    def test_excep
    assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError, MyCalc.new.calc)
    end
    end

    MyCalcTest.rb
    ==========
    # Reverse-Polish Evaluation Test

    require 'test/unit'
    require 'tc_TestSet'
     
    Richard, Dec 3, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Richard

    Robert Feldt Guest

    On 12/3/06, Richard <> wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have a test suite that invokes on test set that specifies
    >
    > assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError, MyCalc.new.calc)
    >
    > When I run the test suite, instead of "1 test, 0 failures, 0 errors",
    > I get the following. The code follows this output.
    >
    > What's up?
    >

    You are using assert_raise in the wrong way. The call you want to test
    must be wrapped in a block so that it's exception can be catched and
    compared to the expected one.

    Try something like

    assert_raise(RuntimeError) {raise ""}

    /Robert
     
    Robert Feldt, Dec 3, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. On 12/2/06, Richard <> wrote:

    > tc_TestSet.rb
    > ==========
    > require '.\BasicCalc.rb'
    >
    > class Test1 < Test::Unit::TestCase # The long-winded way
    > def test_excep
    > assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError, MyCalc.new.calc)
    > end
    > end


    You need to run the code that raises the exception in a block.

    assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError) { MyCalc.new.calc }

    should do the trick.


    --
    Lou.
     
    Louis J Scoras, Dec 3, 2006
    #3
  4. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Hi Robert & Louis,

    You guys were right on! Below is one of my actual test sets, the one
    with the exception testing. It is more complicated than the toy I
    posted, so it took me a few syntax-errors to get it to work. But then
    I got my desired: 17 tests, 17 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors

    Thank you very much for your responses.

    Best wishes,
    Richard



    require '.\RevPolishEvaluator.rb'

    class ErrorTests < Test::Unit::TestCase # The succinct way
    def test1_noarg; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new().eval}; end
    def test2_badop; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new(%w{2 3 $ 7 --
    *}).eval}; end
    def test3_missingdata; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new(%w{2
    +}).eval}; end
    def test4_divby0; assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError) {Polish.new(%w{2 0
    /}).eval}; end
    end
     
    Richard, Dec 3, 2006
    #4
  5. Richard

    Eric Hodel Guest

    On Dec 2, 2006, at 20:40 , Richard wrote:
    > You guys were right on! Below is one of my actual test sets, the one
    > with the exception testing. It is more complicated than the toy I
    > posted, so it took me a few syntax-errors to get it to work. But then
    > I got my desired: 17 tests, 17 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
    >
    > require '.\RevPolishEvaluator.rb'
    >
    > class ErrorTests < Test::Unit::TestCase # The succinct way
    > def test1_noarg; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new().eval}; end
    > def test2_badop; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new(%w{2 3 $
    > 7 --
    > *}).eval}; end
    > def test3_missingdata; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new(%w{2
    > +}).eval}; end
    > def test4_divby0; assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError) {Polish.new(%w{2 0
    > /}).eval}; end
    > end


    Better:

    require 'test/unit'
    require 'rev_polish_evaluator'

    class TestPolish < Test::Unit::TestCase

    def test_eval_bad_operator
    # ...
    end

    def test_eval_divide_by_zero
    # ...
    end

    def test_eval_no_input
    e = assert_raise ArgumentError do Polish.new.eval end
    assert_equal 'no arguments supplied', e.message
    end

    def test_eval_missing_data
    # ...
    end

    end

    Written this way your tests:

    * follow the test/unit naming scheme (TestBlah where Blah is the
    class you're testing)
    * be in the same order as the output (alphabetical)
    * will work with the -n flag:

    $ ruby test_polish.rb -n /eval/

    * will work with testrb:

    $ testrb .

    --
    Eric Hodel - - http://blog.segment7.net

    I LIT YOUR GEM ON FIRE!
     
    Eric Hodel, Dec 3, 2006
    #5
  6. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Hi Eric,

    Thanks for weighing in on my question.

    > def test_eval_no_input

    e = assert_raise ArgumentError do Polish.new.eval end
    assert_equal 'no arguments supplied', e.message
    end

    I like the additions here a lot:
    1. Capturing the exception object
    2. Checking not only the correct exception type is raised but also
    checking the programmed message passed to 'raise'

    > def test_eval_bad_operator

    1. I take it that to conform to unit-test's expectations, the test
    names should begin with test_ and not test1_, test2_ etc.

    2. How about me using test_1_Whatever, test_2_SomethingElse, etc,?
    Wouldn't that conform equally well and cause any error msgs produced by
    Test to be presented in lexicographical order (with fewer than 10
    tests; double digits if I wanted up to 99 tests, etc.)?

    3. I like to produce tests in one-line format if they'll fit on my
    screen reasonably so that I can write and scan them more quickly. Do
    see any substantive problem in my continuing to do that?

    > $ ruby test_polish.rb -n /eval/


    I'm running Ruby_1.8.2-15 over WinXP-Pro/SP2. I tried this command and
    got nothing:

    === Command Window ====
    K:\_Projects\Ruby\TestUnitTesting\ReversePolishEvaluator>ruby
    RevPolishEvaluator.rb -n /eval/

    K:\_Projects\Ruby\TestUnitTesting\ReversePolishEvaluator>
    ====== end ============

    I thought the problem might be that I had no errors, so that there was
    nothing for Test to report. So I introduced an erroneous assertion
    (expressed in three lines rather than my preferred one-line format)
    but still got nothing.

    Then I ran this expanded test through SciTE and got (both in one-line
    format as well as three-line format):

    ==== SciTE output ====
    >ruby RevPolishEvaluatorTest.rb

    Loaded suite RevPolishEvaluatorTest
    Started
    ..............F....
    Finished in 0.031 seconds.

    1) Failure:
    test_5_dummy(ErrorTests) [./tc_TestSet2.rb:12]:
    <1> expected but was
    <2>.

    18 tests, 18 assertions, 1 failures, 0 errors
    >Exit code: 1

    === end ===

    Do you have any idea why the command with the "-n" switch failed on my
    system? My code follows.

    Again, thanks for your suggestions. I look forward to your comments.

    Best wishes,
    Richard

    === RevPolishEvaluator.rb ===
    ### Code same as posted earlier
    === end ===

    === RevPolishEvaluatorTest.rb ===
    # Reverse-Polish Evaluation Test

    require 'test/unit'
    require 'tc_TestSet1' # <= 13 tests that produced no errors;
    file not shown here
    require 'tc_TestSet2'
    === end ===

    === tc_TestSet2.rb ===
    require '.\RevPolishEvaluator.rb'

    class ErrorTests < Test::Unit::TestCase # The succinct way
    def test_1_noarg; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new().eval}; end
    def test_2_badop; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new(%w{2 3 $ 7
    -- *}).eval}; end
    def test_3_missingdata
    e = assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new(%w{2 +}).eval}
    assert_equal('Stack underflow', e.message) #
    <= Had to change the msg to confirm to my coding
    end
    def test_4_divby0; assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError) {Polish.new(%w{2 0
    /}).eval}; end
    def test_5_dummy
    assert_equal(1, 2)
    end
    end
    === end ===

    Eric Hodel wrote:
    > On Dec 2, 2006, at 20:40 , Richard wrote:
    > > You guys were right on! Below is one of my actual test sets, the one
    > > with the exception testing. It is more complicated than the toy I
    > > posted, so it took me a few syntax-errors to get it to work. But then
    > > I got my desired: 17 tests, 17 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
    > >
    > > require '.\RevPolishEvaluator.rb'
    > >
    > > class ErrorTests < Test::Unit::TestCase # The succinct way
    > > def test1_noarg; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new().eval}; end
    > > def test2_badop; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new(%w{2 3 $
    > > 7 --
    > > *}).eval}; end
    > > def test3_missingdata; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new(%w{2
    > > +}).eval}; end
    > > def test4_divby0; assert_raise(ZeroDivisionError) {Polish.new(%w{2 0
    > > /}).eval}; end
    > > end

    >
    > Better:
    >
    > require 'test/unit'
    > require 'rev_polish_evaluator'
    >
    > class TestPolish < Test::Unit::TestCase
    >
    > def test_eval_bad_operator
    > # ...
    > end
    >
    > def test_eval_divide_by_zero
    > # ...
    > end
    >
    > def test_eval_no_input
    > e = assert_raise ArgumentError do Polish.new.eval end
    > assert_equal 'no arguments supplied', e.message
    > end
    >
    > def test_eval_missing_data
    > # ...
    > end
    >
    > end
    >
    > Written this way your tests:
    >
    > * follow the test/unit naming scheme (TestBlah where Blah is the
    > class you're testing)
    > * be in the same order as the output (alphabetical)
    > * will work with the -n flag:
    >
    > $ ruby test_polish.rb -n /eval/
    >
    > * will work with testrb:
    >
    > $ testrb .
    >
    > --
    > Eric Hodel - - http://blog.segment7.net
    >
    > I LIT YOUR GEM ON FIRE!
     
    Richard, Dec 3, 2006
    #6
  7. Richard

    Eric Hodel Guest

    On Dec 3, 2006, at 15:55 , Richard wrote:

    >> def test_eval_bad_operator

    > 1. I take it that to conform to unit-test's expectations, the test
    > names should begin with test_ and not test1_, test2_ etc.


    Numbering tests is not typical behavior (I've seen it very rarely).
    Using #setup and #teardown its easy to avoid the need to number tests.

    The only restrictions test/unit has are that the must start with
    'test' and accept 0 arguments.

    > 2. How about me using test_1_Whatever, test_2_SomethingElse, etc,?
    > Wouldn't that conform equally well and cause any error msgs
    > produced by
    > Test to be presented in lexicographical order (with fewer than 10
    > tests; double digits if I wanted up to 99 tests, etc.)?


    I match test methods to implementation methods and test classes to
    implementation classes. This allows easy auditing (for example with
    ZenTest) or even visually of your test coverage.

    def test_foo() end

    matches

    def foo() end

    and if I need to test a couple edge-cases of foo:

    def test_foo_empty_foopy() end
    def test_foo_no_blah() end

    And everything stays in run order.

    > 3. I like to produce tests in one-line format if they'll fit on my
    > screen reasonably so that I can write and scan them more quickly. Do
    > see any substantive problem in my continuing to do that?


    I don't care, they're your tests (but I hate ; so I had to get rid of
    them.)

    I sometimes write:

    def some_method() do_the_stuff end

    because the ; is ugly, but almost always for test stub objects.

    Most people add newlines.

    >> $ ruby test_polish.rb -n /eval/

    >
    > I'm running Ruby_1.8.2-15 over WinXP-Pro/SP2. I tried this command
    > and
    > got nothing:
    >
    > === Command Window ====
    > K:\_Projects\Ruby\TestUnitTesting\ReversePolishEvaluator>ruby
    > RevPolishEvaluator.rb -n /eval/
    >
    > K:\_Projects\Ruby\TestUnitTesting\ReversePolishEvaluator>
    > ====== end ============
    >
    > I thought the problem might be that I had no errors, so that there was
    > nothing for Test to report. So I introduced an erroneous assertion
    > (expressed in three lines rather than my preferred one-line format)
    > but still got nothing.


    You ran your implementation, not your tests.

    > Then I ran this expanded test through SciTE and got (both in one-line
    > format as well as three-line format):
    >
    > ==== SciTE output ====
    >> ruby RevPolishEvaluatorTest.rb

    > Loaded suite RevPolishEvaluatorTest
    > Started
    > .............F....
    > Finished in 0.031 seconds.


    This one ran with -n

    > Do you have any idea why the command with the "-n" switch failed on my
    > system? My code follows.


    Try again running your test file :)

    > Again, thanks for your suggestions. I look forward to your comments.


    Oh, also you can make your test shorter with setup:

    > === tc_TestSet2.rb ===
    > require '.\RevPolishEvaluator.rb'
    >
    > class ErrorTests < Test::Unit::TestCase # The succinct way


    def setup() @p = Polish.new end

    > def test_1_noarg; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new().eval}; end


    def test_1_noarg() assert_raise ArgumentError do @p.eval end end

    (As you can see, I hate punctuation.)

    --
    Eric Hodel - - http://blog.segment7.net

    I LIT YOUR GEM ON FIRE!
     
    Eric Hodel, Dec 4, 2006
    #7
  8. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Hi Erik,

    Hi Eric,

    > Using #setup and #teardown its easy to avoid the need to number tests.


    Thanks for mentioning them.

    > The only restrictions test/unit has are that the must start with
    > 'test' and accept 0 arguments.

    Excellent

    > I match test methods to implementation methods and test classes to
    > implementation classes. This allows easy auditing [snip]

    I like that, too.

    > And everything stays in run order.

    Ah, that's what I didn't know. I thought my numbering might be
    required to achieve that.

    > I don't care, they're your tests [snip]

    Great.

    > >> $ ruby test_polish.rb -n /eval/

    > > Do you have any idea why the command with the "-n" switch failed on my
    > > system? My code follows.

    >
    > Try again running your test file :)

    Woops!

    Your answers here solved a problem I posted yesterday about another
    messed up test. I have now deleted that post because "I've seen the
    light."

    Below is a toy testing setup. I stuck with my numbered approach for
    the moment because it fit these tests. This setup worked quite nicely.
    If you're in the mood to comment on them, I'd be a grateful recipient.
    But I think I'm OK on this topic now. Incidentally, I thought about
    trying to use lamda expressions to reduce the duplication, but enough
    is enough.

    Again, thank you for providing such thoughtful comments.

    Best wishes,
    Richard

    SetupTeardown.rb
    =============
    class Foo
    MyConst = "Foo's Constant"
    def initialize(n)
    @n = n
    end
    def bar
    "I'm Foo#bar with #{MyConst}#{@n}"
    end
    end

    puts Foo.new(1).bar if __FILE__ == $0

    TestSetupTeardown.rb
    ================
    # "TestSetupTeardown"

    require 'test/unit'
    require 'tc_Test1'

    tc_Test.rb
    ========
    require './SetupTeardown'
    require 'test/unit'
    class TestST < Test::Unit::TestCase
    def setup
    @instance1 = Foo.new(1)
    @instance2 = Foo.new(2)
    end
    def teardown
    @instance1 = nil
    @instance2 = nil
    end
    def test1
    assert_equal("I'm Foo#bar with Foo's Constant1",
    @instance1.bar)
    assert_equal("I'm Foo#bar with Foo's Constant2",
    @instance2.bar)
    end
    end

    Result (using SciTE)
    =====
    >ruby TestSetupTeardown.rb

    Loaded suite TestSetupTeardown
    Started
    ..
    Finished in 0.0 seconds.

    1 tests, 2 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
    >Exit code: 0



    Eric Hodel wrote:
    > On Dec 3, 2006, at 15:55 , Richard wrote:
    >
    > >> def test_eval_bad_operator

    > > 1. I take it that to conform to unit-test's expectations, the test
    > > names should begin with test_ and not test1_, test2_ etc.

    >
    > Numbering tests is not typical behavior (I've seen it very rarely).
    > Using #setup and #teardown its easy to avoid the need to number tests.
    >
    > The only restrictions test/unit has are that the must start with
    > 'test' and accept 0 arguments.
    >
    > > 2. How about me using test_1_Whatever, test_2_SomethingElse, etc,?
    > > Wouldn't that conform equally well and cause any error msgs
    > > produced by
    > > Test to be presented in lexicographical order (with fewer than 10
    > > tests; double digits if I wanted up to 99 tests, etc.)?

    >
    > I match test methods to implementation methods and test classes to
    > implementation classes. This allows easy auditing (for example with
    > ZenTest) or even visually of your test coverage.
    >
    > def test_foo() end
    >
    > matches
    >
    > def foo() end
    >
    > and if I need to test a couple edge-cases of foo:
    >
    > def test_foo_empty_foopy() end
    > def test_foo_no_blah() end
    >
    > And everything stays in run order.
    >
    > > 3. I like to produce tests in one-line format if they'll fit on my
    > > screen reasonably so that I can write and scan them more quickly. Do
    > > see any substantive problem in my continuing to do that?

    >
    > I don't care, they're your tests (but I hate ; so I had to get rid of
    > them.)
    >
    > I sometimes write:
    >
    > def some_method() do_the_stuff end
    >
    > because the ; is ugly, but almost always for test stub objects.
    >
    > Most people add newlines.
    >
    > >> $ ruby test_polish.rb -n /eval/

    > >
    > > I'm running Ruby_1.8.2-15 over WinXP-Pro/SP2. I tried this command
    > > and
    > > got nothing:
    > >
    > > === Command Window ====
    > > K:\_Projects\Ruby\TestUnitTesting\ReversePolishEvaluator>ruby
    > > RevPolishEvaluator.rb -n /eval/
    > >
    > > K:\_Projects\Ruby\TestUnitTesting\ReversePolishEvaluator>
    > > ====== end ============
    > >
    > > I thought the problem might be that I had no errors, so that there was
    > > nothing for Test to report. So I introduced an erroneous assertion
    > > (expressed in three lines rather than my preferred one-line format)
    > > but still got nothing.

    >
    > You ran your implementation, not your tests.
    >
    > > Then I ran this expanded test through SciTE and got (both in one-line
    > > format as well as three-line format):
    > >
    > > ==== SciTE output ====
    > >> ruby RevPolishEvaluatorTest.rb

    > > Loaded suite RevPolishEvaluatorTest
    > > Started
    > > .............F....
    > > Finished in 0.031 seconds.

    >
    > This one ran with -n
    >
    > > Do you have any idea why the command with the "-n" switch failed on my
    > > system? My code follows.

    >
    > Try again running your test file :)
    >
    > > Again, thanks for your suggestions. I look forward to your comments.

    >
    > Oh, also you can make your test shorter with setup:
    >
    > > === tc_TestSet2.rb ===
    > > require '.\RevPolishEvaluator.rb'
    > >
    > > class ErrorTests < Test::Unit::TestCase # The succinct way

    >
    > def setup() @p = Polish.new end
    >
    > > def test_1_noarg; assert_raise(ArgumentError) {Polish.new().eval}; end

    >
    > def test_1_noarg() assert_raise ArgumentError do @p.eval end end
    >
    > (As you can see, I hate punctuation.)
    >
    > --
    > Eric Hodel - - http://blog.segment7.net
    >
    > I LIT YOUR GEM ON FIRE!
     
    Richard, Dec 6, 2006
    #8
  9. Richard

    Rob Sanheim Guest

    Hi,

    <snip>
    > Your answers here solved a problem I posted yesterday about another
    > messed up test. I have now deleted that post because "I've seen the
    > light."
    >
    > Below is a toy testing setup. I stuck with my numbered approach for
    > the moment because it fit these tests. This setup worked quite nicely.
    > If you're in the mood to comment on them, I'd be a grateful recipient.
    > But I think I'm OK on this topic now. Incidentally, I thought about
    > trying to use lamda expressions to reduce the duplication, but enough
    > is enough.


    Why do you want to number your tests? Your tests should be written in
    such a way that they don't depend upon the order they run, so
    numbering them to try and get a specific order is a bad idea. If its
    just to get a nice output when you run the suite, you should look at
    tweaking the test runner or autotest or whatever you use to run your
    tests.

    > Again, thank you for providing such thoughtful comments.
    >
    > Best wishes,
    > Richard
    >
    > SetupTeardown.rb
    > =============
    > class Foo
    > MyConst = "Foo's Constant"
    > def initialize(n)
    > @n = n
    > end
    > def bar
    > "I'm Foo#bar with #{MyConst}#{@n}"
    > end
    > end
    >
    > puts Foo.new(1).bar if __FILE__ == $0
    >
    > TestSetupTeardown.rb
    > ================
    > # "TestSetupTeardown"
    >
    > require 'test/unit'
    > require 'tc_Test1'
    >
    > tc_Test.rb
    > ========
    > require './SetupTeardown'
    > require 'test/unit'
    > class TestST < Test::Unit::TestCase
    > def setup
    > @instance1 = Foo.new(1)
    > @instance2 = Foo.new(2)
    > end
    > def teardown
    > @instance1 = nil
    > @instance2 = nil


    You don't need to set these to nil, as a new instance of the test
    class will be create for each test case. You normally only see
    teardown used for things like closing a database connection, making
    sure a stubbed method gets removed, etc.

    > end
    > def test1
    > assert_equal("I'm Foo#bar with Foo's Constant1",
    > @instance1.bar)
    > assert_equal("I'm Foo#bar with Foo's Constant2",
    > @instance2.bar)
    > end
    > end


    - Rob
     
    Rob Sanheim, Dec 6, 2006
    #9
  10. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Hi Robm,

    Thanks for adding your views to this discussion.

    > Why do you want to number your tests? Your tests should be written in
    > such a way that they don't depend upon the order they run, so
    > numbering them to try and get a specific order is a bad idea. If its
    > just to get a nice output when you run the suite, you should look at
    > tweaking the test runner or autotest or whatever you use to run your
    > tests.


    I like the numbering so that when I start to develop a slew of tests
    for a real app and get a failure(s), I can quickly locate the offending
    test in cases where the app is right and the test needs to be
    corrected. Maybe when I get some real experience in Test Driven
    Development I'll find that's not as helpful as I anticipate it to be.

    I don't do it to get the tests to run in any particular order.

    > > def teardown
    > > @instance1 = nil
    > > @instance2 = nil

    >
    > You don't need to set these to nil, as a new instance of the test
    > class will be create for each test case. You normally only see
    > teardown used for things like closing a database connection, making
    > sure a stubbed method gets removed, etc.

    OK.

    Again, thanks for responding

    Best wishes,
    Richard
     
    Richard, Dec 7, 2006
    #10
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