why doesn't sort properly?

Discussion in 'Perl Misc' started by filippo2991@virgilio.it, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I have the following piece of code that doesn't work properly.

    <MYFILE> is .csv file (semicolon delimited fields).
    I split each row into an array
    I put a reference of each array into another array
    I want to order data by the seventh column of .csv data. The order
    (ascending/descending) depends on $order value. My code (below) doesnt
    work. Why?

    is there a less redundant (and working) way to do that?

    my @lines;

    while (<MYFILE>) {
    push @lines, [split /;/];
    }


    if ($order == 1) {

    sub by_seventh {
    $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    }

    foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {

    print DATA_SORT join (';', @{$_});
    }

    } else {

    sub by_seventh {
    $b->[6] <=> $a->[6];
    }
    foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {

    print DATA_SORT join (';', @{$_});
    }

    }
     
    , Jan 30, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. wrote in news:1138638612.699194.325060
    @g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    >
    > I have the following piece of code that doesn't work properly.
    >
    > <MYFILE> is .csv file (semicolon delimited fields).


    Of course, to be able to check why your code "doesn't work", we would have
    to see some data.

    ....

    Or, maybe not:

    > if ($order == 1) {
    >
    > sub by_seventh {


    ....
    > } else {
    >
    > sub by_seventh {

    ....
    > }


    You should always, yes always,

    use strict;

    and

    use warnings;

    You should also read the documentation for the functions you are using:

    perldoc -f sort


    if( $order == 1 ) {
    @lines = sort { $a->[6] <=> $b->[6] };
    } else {
    @lines = sort { $b->[6] <=> $a->[6] };
    }

    Have you seen the posting guidelines for this group?

    Sinan
     
    A. Sinan Unur, Jan 30, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Ch Lamprecht Guest

    wrote:
    > I have the following piece of code that doesn't work properly.
    >
    > <MYFILE> is .csv file (semicolon delimited fields).
    > I split each row into an array
    > I put a reference of each array into another array
    > I want to order data by the seventh column of .csv data. The order
    > (ascending/descending) depends on $order value. My code (below) doesnt
    > work. Why?
    >
    > is there a less redundant (and working) way to do that?
    >
    > my @lines;
    >
    > while (<MYFILE>) {
    > push @lines, [split /;/];
    > }
    >
    >
    > if ($order == 1) {
    >
    > sub by_seventh {
    > $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    > }
    >
    > foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    >
    > print DATA_SORT join (';', @{$_});
    > }
    >
    > } else {
    >
    > sub by_seventh {
    > $b->[6] <=> $a->[6];
    > }
    > foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    >
    > print DATA_SORT join (';', @{$_});
    > }
    >
    > }
    >

    Hi,
    you could check $order in function by_seventh like that:


    use strict;
    use warnings;

    my @lines;

    while (<DATA>) {
    push @lines, [split /;/];
    }
    my $order = 1;

    sub by_seventh {
    my $test = $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    return $order? $test:-$test;
    }

    foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    print join (';', @{$_});
    }

    __DATA__
    ; ; ; ; ; ;9;
    ; ; ; ; ; ;2;
    ; ; ; ; ; ;4;

    hth Christoph
    --

    perl -e "print scalar reverse q//"
     
    Ch Lamprecht, Jan 30, 2006
    #3
  4. Uri Guttman Guest

    >>>>> "CL" == Ch Lamprecht <> writes:

    CL> you could check $order in function by_seventh like that:

    CL> my $order = 1;

    CL> sub by_seventh {
    CL> my $test = $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    CL> return $order? $test:-$test;
    CL> }

    CL> foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    CL> print join (';', @{$_});
    CL> }

    that is a very poor idea. it makes it hard to use that comparison sub
    elsewhere as $order is a file lexical here. using a global just for this
    is poor design. also it adds unneeded overhead to each comparison there
    are so many other ways to do it. you could reverse the resulting sorted
    array if the data set is small enough. you could declare two compare
    subs, one for each direction.

    uri

    --
    Uri Guttman ------ -------- http://www.stemsystems.com
    --Perl Consulting, Stem Development, Systems Architecture, Design and Coding-
    Search or Offer Perl Jobs ---------------------------- http://jobs.perl.org
     
    Uri Guttman, Jan 30, 2006
    #4
  5. Paul Lalli Guest

    A. Sinan Unur wrote:
    > if( $order == 1 ) {
    > @lines = sort { $a->[6] <=> $b->[6] };
    > } else {
    > @lines = sort { $b->[6] <=> $a->[6] };
    > }


    Hmmm....
    $ perl -e'my @lines = (5, 3, 1, 2, 4); @lines = sort { $a <=> $b };'
    syntax error at -e line 1, near "};"
    Execution of -e aborted due to compilation errors.

    ITYM
    @lines = sort { $a->[6] <=> $b->[6] } @lines;
    and
    @lines = sort { $b->[6] <=> $a->[6] } @lines;

    Paul Lalli
     
    Paul Lalli, Jan 30, 2006
    #5
  6. "Paul Lalli" <> wrote in news:1138644839.155574.73850
    @f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com:

    > A. Sinan Unur wrote:
    >> if( $order == 1 ) {
    >> @lines = sort { $a->[6] <=> $b->[6] };
    >> } else {
    >> @lines = sort { $b->[6] <=> $a->[6] };
    >> }

    >
    > Hmmm....
    > $ perl -e'my @lines = (5, 3, 1, 2, 4); @lines = sort { $a <=> $b };'


    ....

    > ITYM
    > @lines = sort { $a->[6] <=> $b->[6] } @lines;


    Absolutely. Hasty post. Thanks for the correction.


    Sinan
    --
    A. Sinan Unur <>
    (reverse each component and remove .invalid for email address)

    comp.lang.perl.misc guidelines on the WWW:
    http://mail.augustmail.com/~tadmc/clpmisc/clpmisc_guidelines.html
     
    A. Sinan Unur, Jan 30, 2006
    #6
  7. Xicheng Guest

    wrote:
    > I have the following piece of code that doesn't work properly.
    >
    > <MYFILE> is .csv file (semicolon delimited fields).
    > I split each row into an array
    > I put a reference of each array into another array
    > I want to order data by the seventh column of .csv data. The order
    > (ascending/descending) depends on $order value. My code (below) doesnt
    > work. Why?
    >
    > is there a less redundant (and working) way to do that?

    hash may be better to solve this kind of problems, say...
    ============
    my %h=();
    while(<DATA>) {
    my $k = (split/;/)[6];
    $h{$k} = $_;
    }
    foreach my $k(sort {$a <=> $b} keys %h) {
    print $h{$k};
    }
    #(code untested)
    ============
    or on the command line:
    perl -e '$h{(split/;/)[6]}=$_ while<>;print $h{$_}for(sort{$a<=>$b}
    keys %h)' MY_FILE
    or:
    sort -t';' -nk7 MY_FILE

    Xicheng
    >
    > my @lines;
    >
    > while (<MYFILE>) {
    > push @lines, [split /;/];
    > }
    >
    >
    > if ($order == 1) {
    >
    > sub by_seventh {
    > $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    > }
    >
    > foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    >
    > print DATA_SORT join (';', @{$_});
    > }
    >
    > } else {
    >
    > sub by_seventh {
    > $b->[6] <=> $a->[6];
    > }
    > foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    >
    > print DATA_SORT join (';', @{$_});
    > }
    >
    > }
     
    Xicheng, Jan 30, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    Thanks Xicheng for your proposal, the problem is that the numbers $k
    are not unique, if I use them as keys for an hash I lose data.

    fields #6 are numbers like that:

    34.104
    34.646
    24.124
    17.136
    16.876
    20.432
    20.455
    34.05

    if I sort them replacing the if block

    if( $order == 1 ) {
    @lines = sort { $a->[6] <=> $b->[6] };
    } else {
    @lines = sort { $b->[6] <=> $a->[6] };
    }

    with

    @lines = sort { $a->[6] <=> $b->[6] };

    the routine works fine. But I want to choose ascending/descending.

    Any idea?
    Thanks




    I want to sort the records by these numbers
     
    , Jan 31, 2006
    #8
  9. Anno Siegel Guest

    Uri Guttman <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > >>>>> "CL" == Ch Lamprecht <> writes:

    >
    > CL> you could check $order in function by_seventh like that:
    >
    > CL> my $order = 1;
    >
    > CL> sub by_seventh {
    > CL> my $test = $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    > CL> return $order? $test:-$test;
    > CL> }
    >
    > CL> foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    > CL> print join (';', @{$_});
    > CL> }
    >
    > that is a very poor idea. it makes it hard to use that comparison sub
    > elsewhere as $order is a file lexical here. using a global just for this
    > is poor design. also it adds unneeded overhead to each comparison there
    > are so many other ways to do it. you could reverse the resulting sorted
    > array if the data set is small enough.


    Ah, but the *bigger* the data set is, the less will the linear reverse
    be noticeable against the n log n sort.

    > you could declare two compare
    > subs, one for each direction.


    Just for fun, I tried this:

    my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    my @sorted = sort { $$ar <=> $$br } @line;

    but in the sort block $$ar and $$br come up undefined. I don't quite
    understand that. It must be something about the way $a and $b are
    aliased to the list elements.

    Anno
    --
    If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
    "show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
    "Reply" at the bottom of the article headers.
     
    Anno Siegel, Jan 31, 2006
    #9
  10. Ch Lamprecht Guest

    Anno Siegel schrieb:
    > Uri Guttman <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    >
    >>>>>>>"CL" == Ch Lamprecht <> writes:

    >>
    >> CL> you could check $order in function by_seventh like that:
    >>
    >> CL> my $order = 1;
    >>
    >> CL> sub by_seventh {
    >> CL> my $test = $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    >> CL> return $order? $test:-$test;
    >> CL> }
    >>
    >> CL> foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    >> CL> print join (';', @{$_});
    >> CL> }
    >>
    >>that is a very poor idea. it makes it hard to use that comparison sub
    >>elsewhere as $order is a file lexical here. using a global just for this
    >>is poor design. also it adds unneeded overhead to each comparison there
    >>are so many other ways to do it. you could reverse the resulting sorted
    >>array if the data set is small enough.

    >
    >
    > Ah, but the *bigger* the data set is, the less will the linear reverse
    > be noticeable against the n log n sort.
    >
    >
    >>you could declare two compare
    >>subs, one for each direction.

    >
    >
    > Just for fun, I tried this:
    >
    > my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    > my @sorted = sort { $$ar <=> $$br } @line;
    >
    > but in the sort block $$ar and $$br come up undefined. I don't quite
    > understand that. It must be something about the way $a and $b are
    > aliased to the list elements.
    >
    > Anno


    I don't think, ' ? : ' will return a list.

    Christoph

    --

    perl -e "print scalar reverse q//"
     
    Ch Lamprecht, Jan 31, 2006
    #10
  11. Ch Lamprecht Guest

    Ch Lamprecht schrieb:
    > Anno Siegel schrieb:
    >
    >> Uri Guttman <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    >>
    >>>>>>>> "CL" == Ch Lamprecht <> writes:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> CL> you could check $order in function by_seventh like that:
    >>>
    >>> CL> my $order = 1;
    >>>
    >>> CL> sub by_seventh {
    >>> CL> my $test = $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    >>> CL> return $order? $test:-$test;
    >>> CL> }
    >>>
    >>> CL> foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    >>> CL> print join (';', @{$_});
    >>> CL> }
    >>>
    >>> that is a very poor idea. it makes it hard to use that comparison sub
    >>> elsewhere as $order is a file lexical here. using a global just for this
    >>> is poor design. also it adds unneeded overhead to each comparison there
    >>> are so many other ways to do it. you could reverse the resulting sorted
    >>> array if the data set is small enough.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Ah, but the *bigger* the data set is, the less will the linear reverse
    >> be noticeable against the n log n sort.
    >>
    >>
    >>> you could declare two compare
    >>> subs, one for each direction.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Just for fun, I tried this:
    >>
    >> my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    >> my @sorted = sort { $$ar <=> $$br } @line;
    >>
    >> but in the sort block $$ar and $$br come up undefined. I don't quite
    >> understand that. It must be something about the way $a and $b are
    >> aliased to the list elements.
    >>
    >> Anno

    >
    >
    > I don't think, ' ? : ' will return a list.

    sorry for that, I should have checked perlop first... ;)
    > Christoph
    >



    --

    perl -e "print scalar reverse q//"
     
    Ch Lamprecht, Jan 31, 2006
    #11
  12. Paul Lalli Guest

    Ch Lamprecht wrote:
    > Anno Siegel schrieb:
    > > Just for fun, I tried this:
    > >
    > > my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    > > my @sorted = sort { $$ar <=> $$br } @line;
    > >
    > > but in the sort block $$ar and $$br come up undefined. I don't quite
    > > understand that. It must be something about the way $a and $b are
    > > aliased to the list elements.


    >
    > I don't think, ' ? : ' will return a list.


    No reason to guess. 1) Read the Documentation. 2) Try an example

    perldoc perlop:
    Conditional Operator

    Ternary "?:" is the conditional operator, just as in C.
    <...>
    Scalar or list context propagates downward into the 2nd or
    3rd argument, whichever is selected.

    $a = $ok ? $b : $c; # get a scalar
    @a = $ok ? @b : @c; # get an array
    $a = $ok ? @b : @c; # oops, that's just a count!



    $ perl -le'$x = 1; ($a, $b) = $x ? (1, 2) : (3, 4); print "A: $a, B:
    $b"'
    A: 1, B: 2
    $ perl -le'$x = 0; ($a, $b) = $x ? (1, 2) : (3, 4); print "A: $a, B:
    $b"'
    A: 3, B: 4

    Paul Lalli
     
    Paul Lalli, Jan 31, 2006
    #12
  13. Anno Siegel Guest

    Ch Lamprecht <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > Anno Siegel schrieb:
    > > Uri Guttman <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > >
    > >>>>>>>"CL" == Ch Lamprecht <> writes:
    > >>
    > >> CL> you could check $order in function by_seventh like that:
    > >>
    > >> CL> my $order = 1;
    > >>
    > >> CL> sub by_seventh {
    > >> CL> my $test = $a->[6] <=> $b->[6];
    > >> CL> return $order? $test:-$test;
    > >> CL> }
    > >>
    > >> CL> foreach (sort by_seventh @lines) {
    > >> CL> print join (';', @{$_});
    > >> CL> }
    > >>
    > >>that is a very poor idea. it makes it hard to use that comparison sub
    > >>elsewhere as $order is a file lexical here. using a global just for this
    > >>is poor design. also it adds unneeded overhead to each comparison there
    > >>are so many other ways to do it. you could reverse the resulting sorted
    > >>array if the data set is small enough.

    > >
    > >
    > > Ah, but the *bigger* the data set is, the less will the linear reverse
    > > be noticeable against the n log n sort.
    > >
    > >
    > >>you could declare two compare
    > >>subs, one for each direction.

    > >
    > >
    > > Just for fun, I tried this:
    > >
    > > my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    > > my @sorted = sort { $$ar <=> $$br } @line;
    > >
    > > but in the sort block $$ar and $$br come up undefined. I don't quite
    > > understand that. It must be something about the way $a and $b are
    > > aliased to the list elements.
    > >
    > > Anno

    >
    > I don't think, ' ? : ' will return a list.


    It does, test it.

    for my $z ( 0, 1 ) {
    my ( $x, $y) = $z ? qw( a b) : qw( b a);
    print "$z: $x $y\n";
    }

    Anyway, that is only a method to set $ar and $br to the required
    references and it could be done any other way. The question is why
    the references don't de-reference to the values $a and $b have inside
    the sort block.

    Anno
    --
    If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
    "show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
    "Reply" at the bottom of the article headers.
     
    Anno Siegel, Jan 31, 2006
    #13
  14. Ch Lamprecht Guest


    >>I don't think, ' ? : ' will return a list.

    >
    >
    > No reason to guess. 1) Read the Documentation. 2) Try an example
    >

    Thanks, I noticed already ... that was too hasty.
    Christoph
    --

    perl -e "print scalar reverse q//"
     
    Ch Lamprecht, Jan 31, 2006
    #14
  15. Paul Lalli Guest

    Anno Siegel wrote:
    > Just for fun, I tried this:
    >
    > my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    > my @sorted = sort { $$ar <=> $$br } @line;
    >
    > but in the sort block $$ar and $$br come up undefined. I don't quite
    > understand that. It must be something about the way $a and $b are
    > aliased to the list elements.


    Indeed. It would seem that $a and $b are reassigned in each
    "iteration" of the sort:
    $ perl -le'
    my $order = 1;
    my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    print "A_REF: $ar, B_REF: $br";
    my @sorted = sort { print "A: $ar - ".\$a.", B: $br - ".\$a; $$ar <=>
    $$br } (5, 1, 4);
    '
    A_REF: SCALAR(0xfe648), B_REF: SCALAR(0xfe660)
    A: SCALAR(0xfe648) - SCALAR(0xfe780), B: SCALAR(0xfe660) -
    SCALAR(0xfe780)
    A: SCALAR(0xfe648) - SCALAR(0xfe78c), B: SCALAR(0xfe660) -
    SCALAR(0xfe78c)

    I'm willing to bet the DWIM could be achieved by manipulating the
    symbol table and using typeglobs.... but I don't want to go there.

    Paul Lalli
     
    Paul Lalli, Jan 31, 2006
    #15
  16. Paul Lalli Guest

    Ch Lamprecht wrote:
    > >>I don't think, ' ? : ' will return a list.

    > >
    > >
    > > No reason to guess. 1) Read the Documentation. 2) Try an example
    > >

    > Thanks, I noticed already ... that was too hasty.


    Yeah, your retraction arrived at my server between the time I hit
    "reply" and the time I hit "send". :)

    Paul Lalli
     
    Paul Lalli, Jan 31, 2006
    #16
  17. Anno Siegel Guest

    Paul Lalli <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > Anno Siegel wrote:
    > > Just for fun, I tried this:
    > >
    > > my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    > > my @sorted = sort { $$ar <=> $$br } @line;
    > >
    > > but in the sort block $$ar and $$br come up undefined. I don't quite
    > > understand that. It must be something about the way $a and $b are
    > > aliased to the list elements.

    >
    > Indeed. It would seem that $a and $b are reassigned in each
    > "iteration" of the sort:
    > $ perl -le'
    > my $order = 1;
    > my ( $ar, $br) = $order ? \ ( $a, $b) : \ ( $b, $a);
    > print "A_REF: $ar, B_REF: $br";
    > my @sorted = sort { print "A: $ar - ".\$a.", B: $br - ".\$a; $$ar <=>
    > $$br } (5, 1, 4);
    > '
    > A_REF: SCALAR(0xfe648), B_REF: SCALAR(0xfe660)
    > A: SCALAR(0xfe648) - SCALAR(0xfe780), B: SCALAR(0xfe660) -
    > SCALAR(0xfe780)
    > A: SCALAR(0xfe648) - SCALAR(0xfe78c), B: SCALAR(0xfe660) -
    > SCALAR(0xfe78c)
    >
    > I'm willing to bet the DWIM could be achieved by manipulating the
    > symbol table and using typeglobs.... but I don't want to go there.


    Ah, yes, that works:

    my ( $ag, $bg) = $order? ( *a, *b) : ( *b, *a);
    my @sorted = sort { $$ag <=> $$bg } @line;

    But ugh!

    Anno
    --
    If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
    "show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
    "Reply" at the bottom of the article headers.
     
    Anno Siegel, Jan 31, 2006
    #17
  18. Ch Lamprecht Guest

    Anno Siegel wrote:

    >>I'm willing to bet the DWIM could be achieved by manipulating the
    >>symbol table and using typeglobs.... but I don't want to go there.

    >
    >
    > Ah, yes, that works:
    >
    > my ( $ag, $bg) = $order? ( *a, *b) : ( *b, *a);
    > my @sorted = sort { $$ag <=> $$bg } @line;
    >
    > But ugh!
    >
    > Anno

    Hi, what about this (might be trivial?):

    use warnings;
    #use strict;
    use Data::Dumper;
    my @line = (8,2,5,4,3,6,7);
    my $order = 1;
    my ($ar, $br) = $order ? ('a','b') : ('b','a');
    my @sorted = sort { ${$ar} <=> ${$br} } @line;
    print Dumper \@sorted;

    Christoph

    --

    perl -e "print scalar reverse q//"
     
    Ch Lamprecht, Jan 31, 2006
    #18
  19. Anno Siegel Guest

    Ch Lamprecht <> wrote in comp.lang.perl.misc:
    > Anno Siegel wrote:
    >
    > >>I'm willing to bet the DWIM could be achieved by manipulating the
    > >>symbol table and using typeglobs.... but I don't want to go there.

    > >
    > >
    > > Ah, yes, that works:
    > >
    > > my ( $ag, $bg) = $order? ( *a, *b) : ( *b, *a);
    > > my @sorted = sort { $$ag <=> $$bg } @line;
    > >
    > > But ugh!
    > >
    > > Anno

    > Hi, what about this (might be trivial?):
    >
    > use warnings;
    > #use strict;
    > use Data::Dumper;
    > my @line = (8,2,5,4,3,6,7);
    > my $order = 1;
    > my ($ar, $br) = $order ? ('a','b') : ('b','a');
    > my @sorted = sort { ${$ar} <=> ${$br} } @line;
    > print Dumper \@sorted;


    Symrefs? Double ugh! Globs are at least somewhat respectable :)

    Anno
    --
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    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
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    Anno Siegel, Jan 31, 2006
    #19
  20. Paul Lalli Guest

    Ch Lamprecht wrote:
    > use warnings;
    > #use strict;
    > use Data::Dumper;
    > my @line = (8,2,5,4,3,6,7);
    > my $order = 1;
    > my ($ar, $br) = $order ? ('a','b') : ('b','a');
    > my @sorted = sort { ${$ar} <=> ${$br} } @line;
    > print Dumper \@sorted;


    Gah. Don't comment out 'use strict'. That's just a bad idea. If you
    *need* to turn it off, turn off only the part of it you need to turn
    off, and do so in the smallest scope possible:

    #!/usr/bin/perl
    use warnings;
    use strict;
    use Data::Dumper;
    my @line = (8,2,5,4,3,6,7);
    my $order = 0;
    my ($ar, $br) = $order ? ('a','b') : ('b','a');
    my @sorted = sort using_symrefs @line;
    print Dumper \@sorted;

    sub using_symrefs {
    no strict 'refs';
    ${$ar} <=> ${$br};
    }

    Now, whether that's better or worse than using typeglobs, it's hard to
    say...

    Paul Lalli
     
    Paul Lalli, Jan 31, 2006
    #20
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