Why I like only C++?

Discussion in 'C++' started by crea, Mar 5, 2011.

  1. crea

    crea Guest

    This is strange. I dont like any project using other languages than C++ (or
    maybe C). Why is this? Somekind of mental bond...

    I remember doing a project with VB in a company. I did not like it at all.

    Also I lack of interest when I am asked to use other languages.

    Can one be "healed" of this kind of thing?
     
    crea, Mar 5, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 3/5/2011 6:59 PM, crea wrote:
    > This is strange. I dont like any project using other languages than C++ (or
    > maybe C). Why is this? Somekind of mental bond...
    >
    > I remember doing a project with VB in a company. I did not like it at all.
    >
    > Also I lack of interest when I am asked to use other languages.
    >
    > Can one be "healed" of this kind of thing?


    When you get to program more, and the language becomes your tool, not
    your toy, you lose the special relationship (gradually), and start
    developing affinity to solutions, not methods of [en]coding them.

    V
    --
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
     
    Victor Bazarov, Mar 6, 2011
    #2
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  3. crea

    Paul Guest

    "crea" <> wrote in message
    news:98Acp.36919$%2...
    > This is strange. I dont like any project using other languages than C++
    > (or maybe C). Why is this? Somekind of mental bond...
    >
    > I remember doing a project with VB in a company. I did not like it at
    > all.
    >
    > Also I lack of interest when I am asked to use other languages.
    >
    > Can one be "healed" of this kind of thing?


    If MS brought out C# before VB I would've been a big fan. C# would've been
    nice for excel , but VB is a no go area for me.

    The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you learn
    asm. Its the low level understanding of what's going on that you're probsbly
    bonded with, nothing to do with the language syntax. But having said that I
    prefer C++,C, Pascal, Java, javascipt, PHP, C# style syntax to VB
    syntax(which is completely different to all the rest).
     
    Paul, Mar 6, 2011
    #3
  4. crea

    Brian Guest

    Paul wrote:
    > "crea" <> wrote in message
    > news:98Acp.36919$%2...
    >> This is strange. I dont like any project using other languages than
    >> C++ (or maybe C). Why is this? Somekind of mental bond...
    >>
    >> I remember doing a project with VB in a company. I did not like it
    >> at all.
    >>
    >> Also I lack of interest when I am asked to use other languages.
    >>
    >> Can one be "healed" of this kind of thing?

    >
    > If MS brought out C# before VB I would've been a big fan. C# would've
    > been nice for excel , but VB is a no go area for me.
    >
    > The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you
    > learn asm. Its the low level understanding of what's going on that
    > you're probsbly bonded with, nothing to do with the language syntax.
    > But having said that I prefer C++,C, Pascal, Java, javascipt, PHP, C#
    > style syntax to VB syntax(which is completely different to all the
    > rest).


    Pascal? Whoa! Pascal is not a curly-brace language! (And therefore sucks,
    of course).
     
    Brian, Mar 6, 2011
    #4
  5. Paul <> wrote:
    > The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you learn
    > asm.


    That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a while.

    Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?
     
    Juha Nieminen, Mar 6, 2011
    #5
  6. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Juha Nieminen" <> wrote in message
    news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    > Paul <> wrote:
    >> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you
    >> learn
    >> asm.

    >
    > That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a while.
    >
    > Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?
    >

    As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
    mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    declarations but you don't think of it the same.
     
    Paul, Mar 6, 2011
    #6
  7. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
    >>
    >> "Juha Nieminen" <> wrote in message
    >> news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    >>> Paul <> wrote:
    >>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you
    >>>> learn
    >>>> asm.
    >>>
    >>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a while.
    >>>
    >>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?
    >>>

    >> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
    >> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    >> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
    >>

    >
    > And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
    > bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
    >

    Shut up arsehole, i have already proven that is utter shite and that you are
    nothing more than a clueless idiot.

    <snip>
     
    Paul, Mar 6, 2011
    #7
  8. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
    >>
    >> "Juha Nieminen" <> wrote in message
    >> news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    >>> Paul <> wrote:
    >>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you
    >>>> learn
    >>>> asm.
    >>>
    >>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a while.
    >>>
    >>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?
    >>>

    >> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
    >> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    >> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
    >>

    >
    > And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
    > bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
    >
    > In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an object;
    > after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist as machine
    > code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a region of storage.
    >

    16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non segmented
    memory model.
    Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have no
    text segement.

    Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer programming
    world.
     
    Paul, Mar 6, 2011
    #8
  9. On Mar 6, 1:58 am, "Paul" <> wrote:
    > "crea" <> wrote in message
    > news:98Acp.36919$%2...



    > > This is strange. I dont like any project using other languages than C++
    > > (or maybe C). Why is this? Somekind of mental bond...


    narrow thinking? You'll be abetter programmer if you learn a couple
    of extra languages. They allow you to think about different ways to
    address problems. And it is simply easier to do things in some
    languages than others. Perl excels at pattern matching and
    substitution. It's a pain trying to do Perl things in C++. (Maybe the
    Boost regexp stuff makes it better- the sytax looked a little awkward
    to me).


    > > I remember doing  a project with VB in a company. I did not like it at
    > > all.


    probably wise not to like VB. There world of computer langues is
    slightly larger than C++ and VB!


    > > Also I lack of interest when I am asked to use other languages.

    >
    > > Can one be "healed" of this kind of thing?

    >
    > If MS brought out C# before VB I would've been a big fan.


    I've heard C# described as the language that VB should have been.


    > C# would've been
    > nice for excel , but VB is a no go area for me.
    >
    > The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you learn
    > asm.


    you've got to be kidding.


    > Its the low level understanding of what's going on that you're probsbly
    > bonded with, nothing to do with the language syntax.


    At least my C++ programs have a fair chance of running on different
    platforms. asm means I'm tied to today's platform. Plus it'll be ten
    times harder to write the program in the first place.


    > But having said that I
    > prefer C++,C, Pascal, Java, javascipt, PHP, C#  style syntax to VB
    > syntax(which is completely different to all the rest).
     
    Nick Keighley, Mar 6, 2011
    #9
  10. On Mar 6, 8:08 am, Juha Nieminen <> wrote:
    > Paul <> wrote:
    > > The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you learn
    > > asm.

    >
    >   That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a while.
    >
    >   Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?


    he relises how much pain and suffering C++ is sheltering him from
     
    Nick Keighley, Mar 6, 2011
    #10
  11. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
    >>
    >> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >> news:eek:...
    >>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> "Juha Nieminen" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    >>>>> Paul <> wrote:
    >>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you
    >>>>>> learn
    >>>>>> asm.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
    >>>>> while.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?
    >>>>>
    >>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
    >>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    >>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
    >>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
    >>>
    >>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
    >>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist
    >>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
    >>> region of storage.
    >>>

    >> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non segmented
    >> memory model.
    >> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have no
    >> text segement.
    >>
    >> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer programming
    >> world.
    >>

    >
    > I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is meant by
    > the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem with
    > your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get your
    > brain/mental state sorted out.
    >

    No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you have
    clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.

    A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem to
    refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
    models.

    Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a sentence ,
    i.e:
    this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called a text
    segement.
    You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences and
    statements ?
     
    Paul, Mar 6, 2011
    #11
  12. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Nick Keighley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Mar 6, 1:58 am, "Paul" <> wrote:
    > "crea" <> wrote in message
    > news:98Acp.36919$%2...


    <snip>.

    >> Its the low level understanding of what's going on that you're probsbly
    >> bonded with, nothing to do with the language syntax.


    >At least my C++ programs have a fair chance of running on different
    >platforms. asm means I'm tied to today's platform. Plus it'll be ten
    >times harder to write the program in the first place.


    Normally if you use assembly you don't need it to be portable. With many
    embedded systems your only option is to use asm.
    Assembly can also do things you can't do in C++, so sometimes its necessary.

    As you said it's simply easier to do things in some languages than others.

    HTH
    Paul.
     
    Paul, Mar 6, 2011
    #12
  13. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 06/03/2011 13:56, Paul wrote:
    >>
    >> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:eek:...
    >>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Juha Nieminen" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    >>>>>>> Paul <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if
    >>>>>>>> you
    >>>>>>>> learn
    >>>>>>>> asm.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
    >>>>>>> while.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns
    >>>>>>> asm?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
    >>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    >>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
    >>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
    >>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist
    >>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
    >>>>> region of storage.
    >>>>>
    >>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non segmented
    >>>> memory model.
    >>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have
    >>>> no
    >>>> text segement.
    >>>>
    >>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
    >>>> programming
    >>>> world.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is meant
    >>> by the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
    >>> with your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get
    >>> your brain/mental state sorted out.
    >>>

    >> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you have
    >> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
    >>
    >> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem to
    >> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
    >> models.
    >>
    >> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
    >> sentence , i.e:
    >> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called a
    >> text segement.
    >> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences and
    >> statements ?

    >
    > A "text segment" does not require a segmented memory model:


    Yes it does. A memory model with no segments doesn't have a text segment.

    >
    > "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply as
    > text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an object
    > file that contains executable instructions."

    What you are talking about here is a segmented memory model. It's not the
    general case for *all* computer programs.

    >
    > It is possible for the "text segment" and "data segment" to be represented
    > by the same "memory segment" on platforms with segmented memory models or
    > to be equivalent on platforms without a segmented memory model.

    So what is this segment called the "teta" or the "daxt" segment?

    > Even on platforms without a segmented memory model it is common for an
    > executable file to be structured in such a way that data follows the code.

    But there are no segments , no text segment , no data segment no stack
    segment. So your statement ref: "after compilation functions (member of
    otherwise) only exist as machine code in the text segment" is complete
    bullshit.

    <snip rest of Leighs tripe.>
     
    Paul, Mar 6, 2011
    #13
  14. crea

    Ebenezer Guest

    On Mar 5, 5:59 pm, "crea" <> wrote:
    > This is strange. I dont like any project using other languages than C++ (or
    > maybe C). Why is this? Somekind of mental bond...
    >
    > I remember doing  a project with VB in a company. I did not like it at all.


    Sorry about that. I don't think I'd like that either. I know a
    little Perl, Python and shell scripts, but am mostly interested
    in C++. I run across things like this -- http://www.quicklz.com/ [1]
    and I'm just glad I haven't spent time learning C# or Java.
    The link maybe doesn't prove anything, but I tend to think it does.
    Scott Meyers has confessed to being pretty much a C++ only guy.
    I think of it like a marriage. I'm happy with C++. It hasn't let
    me down.


    [1] I've switched to using that compression library. It is
    amazing to me how that code is all of nine-hundred some lines.
    So far it is working great. Oh and I would like to commend his
    license terms here. If you are a small company, say just one
    person, it is free.


    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
    http://webEbenezer.net
     
    Ebenezer, Mar 6, 2011
    #14
  15. crea

    K4 Monk Guest

    On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul" <> wrote:
    > "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:

    >
    > >> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    > >>news:eek:...
    > >>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:

    >
    > >>>> "Juha Nieminen" <> wrote in message
    > >>>>news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    > >>>>> Paul <> wrote:
    > >>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if you
    > >>>>>> learn
    > >>>>>> asm.

    >
    > >>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
    > >>>>> while.

    >
    > >>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns asm?

    >
    > >>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the underlying
    > >>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    > >>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.

    >
    > >>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
    > >>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.

    >
    > >>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
    > >>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist
    > >>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
    > >>> region of storage.

    >
    > >> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non segmented
    > >> memory model.
    > >> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have no
    > >> text segement.

    >
    > >> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer programming
    > >> world.

    >
    > > I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is meant by
    > > the term "text segment".  The only "memory" problem is the problem with
    > > your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get your
    > > brain/mental state sorted out.

    >
    > No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you have
    > clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
    >
    > A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem to
    > refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
    > models.
    >
    > Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a sentence ,
    > i.e:
    > this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called a text
    > segement.
    > You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences and
    > statements ?


    Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
    protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
    binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
    understood them yet).
     
    K4 Monk, Mar 6, 2011
    #15
  16. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
    >> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<> wrote:
    >>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    >>>
    >>> news:...
    >>>
    >>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    >>>>> news:eek:...
    >>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    >>>>>>>> Paul<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear when/if
    >>>>>>>>> you
    >>>>>>>>> learn
    >>>>>>>>> asm.
    >>>
    >>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
    >>>>>>>> while.
    >>>
    >>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he learns
    >>>>>>>> asm?
    >>>
    >>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
    >>>>>>> underlying
    >>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    >>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
    >>>
    >>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
    >>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
    >>>
    >>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
    >>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only exist
    >>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
    >>>>>> region of storage.
    >>>
    >>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
    >>>>> segmented
    >>>>> memory model.
    >>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they have
    >>>>> no
    >>>>> text segement.
    >>>
    >>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
    >>>>> programming
    >>>>> world.
    >>>
    >>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is meant
    >>>> by
    >>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem with
    >>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get your
    >>>> brain/mental state sorted out.
    >>>
    >>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you have
    >>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
    >>>
    >>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem to
    >>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
    >>> models.
    >>>
    >>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
    >>> sentence ,
    >>> i.e:
    >>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called a
    >>> text
    >>> segement.
    >>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences and
    >>> statements ?

    >>
    >> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
    >> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
    >> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
    >> understood them yet).

    >
    > No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text segments"
    > and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory model; "text
    > segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not requiring a
    > segmented memory model.
    >

    The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory model.
    If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.

    Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another typical
    example of his verbal diahorrea.
     
    Paul, Mar 7, 2011
    #16
  17. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 07/03/2011 01:41, Paul wrote:
    >>
    >> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
    >>>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<> wrote:
    >>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>
    >>>>> news:...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>> news:eek:...
    >>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    >>>>>>>>>> Paul<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear
    >>>>>>>>>>> when/if you
    >>>>>>>>>>> learn
    >>>>>>>>>>> asm.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in a
    >>>>>>>>>> while.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he
    >>>>>>>>>> learns asm?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
    >>>>>>>>> underlying
    >>>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    >>>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't keep
    >>>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of an
    >>>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only
    >>>>>>>> exist
    >>>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
    >>>>>>>> region of storage.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
    >>>>>>> segmented
    >>>>>>> memory model.
    >>>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they
    >>>>>>> have no
    >>>>>>> text segement.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
    >>>>>>> programming
    >>>>>>> world.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is
    >>>>>> meant by
    >>>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
    >>>>>> with
    >>>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get your
    >>>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you
    >>>>> have
    >>>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you seem
    >>>>> to
    >>>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with memory
    >>>>> models.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
    >>>>> sentence ,
    >>>>> i.e:
    >>>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called
    >>>>> a text
    >>>>> segement.
    >>>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences
    >>>>> and
    >>>>> statements ?
    >>>>
    >>>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
    >>>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
    >>>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
    >>>> understood them yet).
    >>>
    >>> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text
    >>> segments" and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory model;
    >>> "text segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not
    >>> requiring a segmented memory model.
    >>>

    >> The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory
    >> model. If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.
    >>
    >> Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another typical
    >> example of his verbal diahorrea.
    >>

    >
    > "Text segments" do not require a segmented memory model;


    Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then.. :)

    |<snip>
    *waits for the flow of verbal diahorrea to begin*
     
    Paul, Mar 7, 2011
    #17
  18. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 07/03/2011 13:47, Paul wrote:
    >>
    >> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On 07/03/2011 01:41, Paul wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
    >>>>>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<> wrote:
    >>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>> news:eek:...
    >>>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    >>>>>>>>>>>> Paul<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> when/if you
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> learn
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> asm.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in
    >>>>>>>>>>>> a
    >>>>>>>>>>>> while.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he
    >>>>>>>>>>>> learns asm?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
    >>>>>>>>>>> underlying
    >>>>>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    >>>>>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't
    >>>>>>>>>> keep
    >>>>>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of
    >>>>>>>>>> an
    >>>>>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only
    >>>>>>>>>> exist
    >>>>>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
    >>>>>>>>>> region of storage.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
    >>>>>>>>> segmented
    >>>>>>>>> memory model.
    >>>>>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they
    >>>>>>>>> have no
    >>>>>>>>> text segement.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
    >>>>>>>>> programming
    >>>>>>>>> world.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is
    >>>>>>>> meant by
    >>>>>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
    >>>>>>>> with
    >>>>>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get
    >>>>>>>> your
    >>>>>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you
    >>>>>>> have
    >>>>>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you
    >>>>>>> seem to
    >>>>>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with
    >>>>>>> memory
    >>>>>>> models.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
    >>>>>>> sentence ,
    >>>>>>> i.e:
    >>>>>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called
    >>>>>>> a text
    >>>>>>> segement.
    >>>>>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences
    >>>>>>> and
    >>>>>>> statements ?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
    >>>>>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
    >>>>>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
    >>>>>> understood them yet).
    >>>>>
    >>>>> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text
    >>>>> segments" and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory model;
    >>>>> "text segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not
    >>>>> requiring a segmented memory model.
    >>>>>
    >>>> The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory
    >>>> model. If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.
    >>>>
    >>>> Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another typical
    >>>> example of his verbal diahorrea.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> "Text segments" do not require a segmented memory model;

    >>
    >> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then.. :)
    >>

    >
    > "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply as
    > text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an object
    > file that contains executable instructions."
    >
    > -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_segment
    >
    > /Leigh


    Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then.. :)
     
    Paul, Mar 7, 2011
    #18
  19. crea

    Paul Guest

    "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 07/03/2011 16:32, Paul wrote:
    >>
    >> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On 07/03/2011 13:47, Paul wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> On 07/03/2011 01:41, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> news:...
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>>>> news:eek:...
    >>>>>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Paul<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> when/if you
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> learn
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> asm.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> in a
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> while.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>> learns asm?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> underlying
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> array
    >>>>>>>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't
    >>>>>>>>>>>> keep
    >>>>>>>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member
    >>>>>>>>>>>> of an
    >>>>>>>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only
    >>>>>>>>>>>> exist
    >>>>>>>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is
    >>>>>>>>>>>> simply a
    >>>>>>>>>>>> region of storage.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
    >>>>>>>>>>> segmented
    >>>>>>>>>>> memory model.
    >>>>>>>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they
    >>>>>>>>>>> have no
    >>>>>>>>>>> text segement.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
    >>>>>>>>>>> programming
    >>>>>>>>>>> world.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is
    >>>>>>>>>> meant by
    >>>>>>>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
    >>>>>>>>>> with
    >>>>>>>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get
    >>>>>>>>>> your
    >>>>>>>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you
    >>>>>>>>> have
    >>>>>>>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you
    >>>>>>>>> seem to
    >>>>>>>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with
    >>>>>>>>> memory
    >>>>>>>>> models.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
    >>>>>>>>> sentence ,
    >>>>>>>>> i.e:
    >>>>>>>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe
    >>>>>>>>> called
    >>>>>>>>> a text
    >>>>>>>>> segement.
    >>>>>>>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of
    >>>>>>>>> sentences
    >>>>>>>>> and
    >>>>>>>>> statements ?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
    >>>>>>>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just
    >>>>>>>> pure
    >>>>>>>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
    >>>>>>>> understood them yet).
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text
    >>>>>>> segments" and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory
    >>>>>>> model;
    >>>>>>> "text segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not
    >>>>>>> requiring a segmented memory model.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory
    >>>>>> model. If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another
    >>>>>> typical
    >>>>>> example of his verbal diahorrea.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Text segments" do not require a segmented memory model;
    >>>>
    >>>> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then..
    >>>> :)
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply
    >>> as text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an
    >>> object file that contains executable instructions."
    >>>
    >>> -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_segment
    >>>
    >>> /Leigh

    >>
    >> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then.. :)
    >>

    >
    > "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply as
    > text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an object
    > file that contains executable instructions."
    >
    > -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_segment
    >
    > /Leigh


    Completely illogical , u reasonable , inintelligent arsehole ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
     
    Paul, Mar 7, 2011
    #19
  20. crea

    hanukas Guest

    On Mar 7, 6:32 pm, "Paul" <> wrote:
    > "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 07/03/2011 13:47, Paul wrote:

    >
    > >> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    > >>news:...
    > >>> On 07/03/2011 01:41, Paul wrote:

    >
    > >>>> "Leigh Johnston" <> wrote in message
    > >>>>news:...
    > >>>>> On 06/03/2011 23:40, K4 Monk wrote:
    > >>>>>> On Mar 6, 6:56 pm, "Paul"<> wrote:
    > >>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message

    >
    > >>>>>>>news:...

    >
    > >>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 13:38, Paul wrote:

    >
    > >>>>>>>>> "Leigh Johnston"<> wrote in message
    > >>>>>>>>>news:eek:...
    > >>>>>>>>>> On 06/03/2011 11:13, Paul wrote:

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>>> "Juha Nieminen"<> wrote in message
    > >>>>>>>>>>>news:4d734116$0$2867$...
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> Paul<> wrote:
    > >>>>>>>>>>>>> The mental bond you have with C++ will probably dissapear
    > >>>>>>>>>>>>> when/if you
    > >>>>>>>>>>>>> learn
    > >>>>>>>>>>>>> asm.

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> That's the most random and surrealistic comment I have seen in
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> a
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> while.

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> Why would his attitude towards C++ change in any way if he
    > >>>>>>>>>>>> learns asm?

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>>> As I said its not the sysntax its the understanding of the
    > >>>>>>>>>>> underlying
    > >>>>>>>>>>> mechanics. Java syntax is almost identical but with better array
    > >>>>>>>>>>> declarations but you don't think of it the same.

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>> And if *you* understood the underlying mechanics you wouldn't
    > >>>>>>>>>> keep
    > >>>>>>>>>> bleating that a member function is a member of an object.

    >
    > >>>>>>>>>> In C++ a member function is a member of a class not a member of
    > >>>>>>>>>> an
    > >>>>>>>>>> object; after compilation functions (member of otherwise) only
    > >>>>>>>>>> exist
    > >>>>>>>>>> as machine code in the text segment; in C++ an object is simply a
    > >>>>>>>>>> region of storage.

    >
    > >>>>>>>>> 16-bit MS-DOS tiny memory model is one clear example of a non
    > >>>>>>>>> segmented
    > >>>>>>>>> memory model.
    > >>>>>>>>> Strange how we can use C++ functions in these programs, yet they
    > >>>>>>>>> have no
    > >>>>>>>>> text segement.

    >
    > >>>>>>>>> Something is wrong , its either you or the complete computer
    > >>>>>>>>> programming
    > >>>>>>>>> world.

    >
    > >>>>>>>> I have already instructed you on more than one occasion what is
    > >>>>>>>> meant by
    > >>>>>>>> the term "text segment". The only "memory" problem is the problem
    > >>>>>>>> with
    > >>>>>>>> your own memory; you should probably go and see your GP and get
    > >>>>>>>> your
    > >>>>>>>> brain/mental state sorted out.

    >
    > >>>>>>> No you have not clarified what you mean by "text segement" all you
    > >>>>>>> have
    > >>>>>>> clarified is that you don't know what you are talknig about.

    >
    > >>>>>>> A text segment only exists n the context of a memory model, you
    > >>>>>>> seem to
    > >>>>>>> refer to another kind of text segment that has nothing to with
    > >>>>>>> memory
    > >>>>>>> models.

    >
    > >>>>>>> Ahh voila! Now I understand you mean text segment as in part of a
    > >>>>>>> sentence ,
    > >>>>>>> i.e:
    > >>>>>>> this is a string of text, containing a segment of text, maybe called
    > >>>>>>> a text
    > >>>>>>> segement.
    > >>>>>>> You are being philosophical like SG with his philosophy of sentences
    > >>>>>>> and
    > >>>>>>> statements ?

    >
    > >>>>>> Not all programs need a text or data segments if not running in
    > >>>>>> protected mode. For example in MS-DOS's .COM files, it was just pure
    > >>>>>> binary without any extra hooplas that EXE files have (haven't
    > >>>>>> understood them yet).

    >
    > >>>>> No; text and data segments were the same in .COM files; "text
    > >>>>> segments" and "data segments" do not require a segmented memory model;
    > >>>>> "text segment" is computer science term with a specific meaning not
    > >>>>> requiring a segmented memory model.

    >
    > >>>> The term "text segment" only has a meaning in the context of a memory
    > >>>> model. If the memory model has no segments there is no text segment.

    >
    > >>>> Leighs *specific* meaning of "text segment" seems to be another typical
    > >>>> example of his verbal diahorrea.

    >
    > >>> "Text segments" do not require a segmented memory model;

    >
    > >> Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then.. :)

    >
    > > "In computing, a code segment, also known as a text segment or simply as
    > > text, is a phrase used to refer to a portion of memory or of an object
    > > file that contains executable instructions."

    >
    > > --http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Text_segment

    >
    > > /Leigh

    >
    > Explain what a text segment is in a non segmented memory model then.. :)


    It's still a text segment, does't matter if it's mapped through
    descriptor, page or something else. The name is an artifact from times
    long bygone, we're stuck with it.
     
    hanukas, Mar 8, 2011
    #20
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