Windows System Administration: State of the Art on Python?

Discussion in 'Python' started by Krishna Kirti Das, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. I am a long-time user of Perl who comes to you in peace and is
    evaluating different scripting languages for use as a scripting
    platform for system administrators on the Windows platform. Perl
    already has many modules that allow sys admins and devolpers to do
    lots of things with the Windows OS, and I'm wondering what the state
    of the art is with Python and being able to control and administer a
    windows environment. In this regard, how does Python stand up against
    Perl?
    Krishna Kirti Das, Feb 26, 2008
    #1
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  2. Krishna Kirti Das

    jay graves Guest

    On Feb 26, 3:23 pm, Krishna Kirti Das <> wrote:
    > I am a long-time user of Perl who comes to you in peace and is
    > evaluating different scripting languages for use as a scripting
    > platform for system administrators on the Windows platform. Perl
    > already has many modules that allow sys admins and devolpers to do
    > lots of things with the Windows OS, and I'm wondering what the state
    > of the art is with Python and being able to control and administer a
    > windows environment. In this regard, how does Python stand up against
    > Perl?


    I can't comment on how it stacks up against Perl but I've pointed to
    Tim Golden's collection several times. Lots of good stuff there.

    http://tgolden.sc.sabren.com/python/index.html

    ....
    Jay
    jay graves, Feb 26, 2008
    #2
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  3. On Feb 26, 3:23 pm, Krishna Kirti Das <> wrote:
    > I am a long-time user of Perl who comes to you in peace and is
    > evaluating different scripting languages for use as a scripting
    > platform for system administrators on the Windows platform. Perl
    > already has many modules that allow sys admins and devolpers to do
    > lots of things with the Windows OS, and I'm wondering what the state
    > of the art is with Python and being able to control and administer a
    > windows environment. In this regard, how does Python stand up against
    > Perl?


    There's the PyWin32 module if you want to do low-level stuff:

    http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/docs/ActivePython/2.5/pywin32/PyWin32.html
    http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/docs/ActivePython/2.5/pywin32/win32_modules.html

    Or you can "roll-your-own" (sort of) with the ctypes module:

    http://docs.python.org/lib/module-ctypes.html

    The PyWin32 basically exposes most (if not all) of the Windows API. I
    think ctypes is usually used for COM black magic. There's also a
    slightly higher level wrapper for WMI that you can use:

    http://tgolden.sc.sabren.com/python/wmi.html
    http://tgolden.sc.sabren.com/python/wmi_cookbook.html

    Tell us what you want to do and we'll tell you if (and maybe how) you
    can do it with Python.

    Mike
    Mike Driscoll, Feb 26, 2008
    #3
  4. > I am a long-time user of Perl who comes to you in peace and is
    > evaluating different scripting languages for use as a scripting
    > platform for system administrators on the Windows platform. Perl
    > already has many modules that allow sys admins and devolpers to do
    > lots of things with the Windows OS, and I'm wondering what the state
    > of the art is with Python and being able to control and administer a
    > windows environment. In this regard, how does Python stand up against
    > Perl?


    As everybody else, I cannot compare it to Perl, because I don't know
    Perl good enough (or at all, for that matter). I found Python does
    *very* well in Windows system administration, in many cases, better
    than Visual Basic (IMO, and for the things I wanted to do). I've
    mostly used the COM integration, as the things I wanted to manage
    had COM (automation) interfaces.

    Regards,
    Martin
    Martin v. Löwis, Feb 26, 2008
    #4
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