with as a reserved word

Discussion in 'Python' started by BBands, Jun 11, 2007.

  1. BBands

    BBands Guest

    I gather that 'with' is on its way to becoming a reserved word. Is
    this something that will break?

    import Gnuplot
    gp = Gnuplot.Gnuplot(debug=1)
    data = Gnuplot.Data([1,2,3,4,3,2,3,4,3,2,1], with='linespoints')
    gp.plot(data)

    >>> <module1>:3: Warning: 'with' will become a reserved keyword in Python 2.6


    http://www.gnuplot.info/
    http://gnuplot-py.sourceforge.net/

    This was run by PyScripter 1.8.7.1 with Python 2.5.

    jab
    BBands, Jun 11, 2007
    #1
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  2. BBands

    Guest

    On Jun 11, 10:03 am, BBands <> wrote:
    > I gather that 'with' is on its way to becoming a reserved word. Is
    > this something that will break?
    >
    > import Gnuplot
    > gp = Gnuplot.Gnuplot(debug=1)
    > data = Gnuplot.Data([1,2,3,4,3,2,3,4,3,2,1], with='linespoints')
    > gp.plot(data)
    >
    > >>> <module1>:3: Warning: 'with' will become a reserved keyword in Python 2.6

    >
    > http://www.gnuplot.info/http://gnuplot-py.sourceforge.net/
    >
    > This was run by PyScripter 1.8.7.1 with Python 2.5.
    >
    > jab


    Looks that way since you can assign anything to 'for' or 'if' or other
    reserved words.

    Mike
    , Jun 11, 2007
    #2
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  3. Within gnuplot you can shorten "with" to "w", don't know if it can
    work inside a call to Gnuplot.Data()....

    francesco

    On 6/11/07, BBands <> wrote:
    > I gather that 'with' is on its way to becoming a reserved word. Is
    > this something that will break?
    >
    > import Gnuplot
    > gp = Gnuplot.Gnuplot(debug=1)
    > data = Gnuplot.Data([1,2,3,4,3,2,3,4,3,2,1], with='linespoints')
    > gp.plot(data)
    >
    > >>> <module1>:3: Warning: 'with' will become a reserved keyword in Python 2.6

    >
    > http://www.gnuplot.info/
    > http://gnuplot-py.sourceforge.net/
    >
    > This was run by PyScripter 1.8.7.1 with Python 2.5.
    >
    > jab
    >
    > --
    > http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
    >



    --
    "Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as
    both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of fate. This visage, no
    mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant,
    vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a bygone vexation
    stands vivified, and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent
    vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and
    voracious violation of volition. The only verdict is vengeance; a
    vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of
    such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily,
    this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose vis-à-vis an
    introduction, so let me simply add that it's my very good honor to
    meet you and you may call me V." -- V's introduction to Evey
    Francesco Guerrieri, Jun 11, 2007
    #3
  4. BBands wrote:

    > I gather that 'with' is on its way to becoming a reserved word. Is
    > this something that will break?


    yes.

    > import Gnuplot
    > gp = Gnuplot.Gnuplot(debug=1)
    > data = Gnuplot.Data([1,2,3,4,3,2,3,4,3,2,1], with='linespoints')


    if you have Python 2.5, you can try it out yourself:

    >>> dict(with=1)

    <stdin>:1: Warning: 'with' will become a reserved keyword in Python 2.6
    {'with': 1}

    >>> from __future__ import with_statement
    >>> dict(with=1)

    File "<stdin>", line 1
    dict(with=1)
    ^
    SyntaxError: invalid syntax

    </F>
    Fredrik Lundh, Jun 11, 2007
    #4
  5. BBands

    BBands Guest

    On Jun 11, 11:34 am, Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    > if you have Python 2.5, you can try it out yourself:
    >
    > >>> dict(with=1)

    > <stdin>:1: Warning: 'with' will become a reserved keyword in Python 2.6
    > {'with': 1}
    >
    > >>> from __future__ import with_statement
    > >>> dict(with=1)

    > File "<stdin>", line 1
    > dict(with=1)
    > ^
    > SyntaxError: invalid syntax


    I see that this change appears to be final.

    http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0343/

    I don't have an opinion, pro or con, on this PEP, but I'll bet that it
    breaks a lot of code.

    jab
    BBands, Jun 11, 2007
    #5
  6. BBands wrote:

    > I don't have an opinion, pro or con, on this PEP, but I'll bet that it
    > breaks a lot of code.


    that's why you get warnings in 2.5, so you have time to update your
    code; see:

    http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0005/

    estimating what "a lot" is isn't trivial, but it's worth noting that a
    search for "lang:python \swith\W" over at google's code search only
    brings up about 200 cases, and most of those are found in comments and
    string literals. and in Zope.

    </F>
    Fredrik Lundh, Jun 11, 2007
    #6
  7. BBands

    BBands Guest

    On Jun 11, 12:47 pm, Fredrik Lundh <> wrote:
    > estimating what "a lot" is isn't trivial, but it's worth noting that a
    > search for "lang:python \swith\W" over at google's code search only
    > brings up about 200 cases, and most of those are found in comments and
    > string literals. and in Zope.


    Well then, it would seem that the problems will be minimal. Good. I'll
    have a look a the gnuplot.py code and post heads-up note to their
    list.

    Thanks,

    jab
    BBands, Jun 11, 2007
    #7
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