WLAN tester

Discussion in 'Python' started by Wanderer, Jan 28, 2013.

  1. Wanderer

    Wanderer Guest

    I'm looking to make a WLAN tester for a manufacturing test. Something that could send and receive a bunch of files and measure how long it took. I would repeat this a number of times for a device under test and then use some metric to decide pass/fail and create a report. What libraries are available for Python for communicating with networks? My google searches have been disappointing. I'd prefer to do this in Windows but I'll consider Linux if that is the better option.

    Thanks
    Wanderer, Jan 28, 2013
    #1
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  2. Wanderer

    Dave Angel Guest

    On 01/28/2013 10:47 AM, Wanderer wrote:
    > I'm looking to make a WLAN tester for a manufacturing test. Something that could send and receive a bunch of files and measure how long it took. I would repeat this a number of times for a device under test and then use some metric to decide pass/fail and create a report. What libraries are available for Python for communicating with networks? My google searches have been disappointing. I'd prefer to do this in Windows but I'll consider Linux if that is the better option.
    >
    > Thanks
    >

    For what version of Python?

    Depending on what's at the far end of your connection, you may not need
    to do much at all. For example, if you have an ftp server, check out
    http://docs.python.org/2/library/ftplib.html

    in the standard library.



    Since you're doing performance testing, be aware that it's quite tricky
    to get meaningful results. For example, some connections have a
    satellite link in them, and thus have very long latency. A simple
    protocol will go very slowly in such a case, but most downloaders will
    open multiple sockets, and do many transfers in parallel. So you could
    either measure the slow way or the fast way, and both numbers are
    meaningful.

    Of course, it's more than a 2-way choice. Some protocols will compress
    the data, send it, and decompress it on the other end. Others (like the
    one rsync uses) will evaluate both ends, and decide which (if any) files
    need to be transferred at all. I believe it also does partial file
    updates if possible, but I'm not at all sure about that.

    Naturally, the throughput will vary greatly from moment to moment, and
    may be affected by lots of things you cannot see.

    --
    DaveA
    Dave Angel, Jan 28, 2013
    #2
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  3. Wanderer

    Wanderer Guest

    On Monday, January 28, 2013 11:30:47 AM UTC-5, Dave Angel wrote:
    > On 01/28/2013 10:47 AM, Wanderer wrote:
    >
    > > I'm looking to make a WLAN tester for a manufacturing test. Something that could send and receive a bunch of files and measure how long it took. Iwould repeat this a number of times for a device under test and then use some metric to decide pass/fail and create a report. What libraries are available for Python for communicating with networks? My google searches have been disappointing. I'd prefer to do this in Windows but I'll consider Linuxif that is the better option.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Thanks

    >
    > >

    >
    > For what version of Python?
    >
    >
    >
    > Depending on what's at the far end of your connection, you may not need
    >
    > to do much at all. For example, if you have an ftp server, check out
    >
    > http://docs.python.org/2/library/ftplib.html
    >
    >
    >
    > in the standard library.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Since you're doing performance testing, be aware that it's quite tricky
    >
    > to get meaningful results. For example, some connections have a
    >
    > satellite link in them, and thus have very long latency. A simple
    >
    > protocol will go very slowly in such a case, but most downloaders will
    >
    > open multiple sockets, and do many transfers in parallel. So you could
    >
    > either measure the slow way or the fast way, and both numbers are
    >
    > meaningful.
    >
    >
    >
    > Of course, it's more than a 2-way choice. Some protocols will compress
    >
    > the data, send it, and decompress it on the other end. Others (like the
    >
    > one rsync uses) will evaluate both ends, and decide which (if any) files
    >
    > need to be transferred at all. I believe it also does partial file
    >
    > updates if possible, but I'm not at all sure about that.
    >
    >
    >
    > Naturally, the throughput will vary greatly from moment to moment, and
    >
    > may be affected by lots of things you cannot see.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > DaveA


    Yes. I noticed this variability. I've been using the Totusoft Lan_Speedtest..exe to test some modules. I've tested through the wifi to our intranet andsaw variations I believe do to network traffic. I also tried peer to peer and the write time actual got worse. I don't know if it has do to with the firewall or the hard drive speed or just Windows giving this process low priority. I also saw drop outs. So figuring out the metric for pass/fail willbe interesting. I'll check into setting an ftp for this test.

    Thanks
    Wanderer, Jan 28, 2013
    #3
  4. Wanderer

    Wanderer Guest

    On Monday, January 28, 2013 11:30:47 AM UTC-5, Dave Angel wrote:
    > On 01/28/2013 10:47 AM, Wanderer wrote:
    >
    > > I'm looking to make a WLAN tester for a manufacturing test. Something that could send and receive a bunch of files and measure how long it took. Iwould repeat this a number of times for a device under test and then use some metric to decide pass/fail and create a report. What libraries are available for Python for communicating with networks? My google searches have been disappointing. I'd prefer to do this in Windows but I'll consider Linuxif that is the better option.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Thanks

    >
    > >

    >
    > For what version of Python?
    >
    >
    >
    > Depending on what's at the far end of your connection, you may not need
    >
    > to do much at all. For example, if you have an ftp server, check out
    >
    > http://docs.python.org/2/library/ftplib.html
    >
    >
    >
    > in the standard library.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Since you're doing performance testing, be aware that it's quite tricky
    >
    > to get meaningful results. For example, some connections have a
    >
    > satellite link in them, and thus have very long latency. A simple
    >
    > protocol will go very slowly in such a case, but most downloaders will
    >
    > open multiple sockets, and do many transfers in parallel. So you could
    >
    > either measure the slow way or the fast way, and both numbers are
    >
    > meaningful.
    >
    >
    >
    > Of course, it's more than a 2-way choice. Some protocols will compress
    >
    > the data, send it, and decompress it on the other end. Others (like the
    >
    > one rsync uses) will evaluate both ends, and decide which (if any) files
    >
    > need to be transferred at all. I believe it also does partial file
    >
    > updates if possible, but I'm not at all sure about that.
    >
    >
    >
    > Naturally, the throughput will vary greatly from moment to moment, and
    >
    > may be affected by lots of things you cannot see.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > DaveA


    Yes. I noticed this variability. I've been using the Totusoft Lan_Speedtest..exe to test some modules. I've tested through the wifi to our intranet andsaw variations I believe do to network traffic. I also tried peer to peer and the write time actual got worse. I don't know if it has do to with the firewall or the hard drive speed or just Windows giving this process low priority. I also saw drop outs. So figuring out the metric for pass/fail willbe interesting. I'll check into setting an ftp for this test.

    Thanks
    Wanderer, Jan 28, 2013
    #4
  5. Wanderer

    Rob Day Guest

    On 28 January 2013 17:07, Wanderer <> wrote:
    > Yes. I noticed this variability. I've been using the Totusoft Lan_Speedtest.exe to test some modules. I've tested through the wifi to our intranet and saw variations I believe do to network traffic. I also tried peer to peer and the write time actual got worse. I don't know if it has do to with the firewall or the hard drive speed or just Windows giving this process low priority. I also saw drop outs. So figuring out the metric for pass/fail will be interesting. I'll check into setting an ftp for this test.


    Why involve a protocol at all? I'd just create a socket
    (http://docs.python.org/3.3/library/socket.html) and measure how long,
    on average, it took to write a given number of arbitrary bytes (e.g.
    "This is a string" repeated a million times) to it and then read a
    given number of bytes back. That would be a relatively consistent
    metric, whereas if you try using FTP you'll run into issues, as
    already noted, where disk read/write speed and details of your FTP
    server implementation like compression or multiple network connections
    affect the result significantly.

    --
    Robert K. Day
    Rob Day, Jan 28, 2013
    #5
  6. Wanderer

    Wanderer Guest

    On Monday, January 28, 2013 12:32:50 PM UTC-5, Rob Day wrote:
    > On 28 January 2013 17:07, Wanderer wrote:
    >
    > > Yes. I noticed this variability. I've been using the Totusoft Lan_Speedtest.exe to test some modules. I've tested through the wifi to our intranetand saw variations I believe do to network traffic. I also tried peer to peer and the write time actual got worse. I don't know if it has do to with the firewall or the hard drive speed or just Windows giving this process low priority. I also saw drop outs. So figuring out the metric for pass/fail will be interesting. I'll check into setting an ftp for this test.

    >
    >
    >
    > Why involve a protocol at all? I'd just create a socket
    >
    > (http://docs.python.org/3.3/library/socket.html) and measure how long,
    >
    > on average, it took to write a given number of arbitrary bytes (e.g.
    >
    > "This is a string" repeated a million times) to it and then read a
    >
    > given number of bytes back. That would be a relatively consistent
    >
    > metric, whereas if you try using FTP you'll run into issues, as
    >
    > already noted, where disk read/write speed and details of your FTP
    >
    > server implementation like compression or multiple network connections
    >
    > affect the result significantly.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Robert K. Day
    >
    >


    Thanks, I'll check out sockets. That's probably what I needed to search forinstead WLAN and Wi-Fi.
    Wanderer, Jan 28, 2013
    #6
  7. Wanderer

    Wanderer Guest

    On Monday, January 28, 2013 12:32:50 PM UTC-5, Rob Day wrote:
    > On 28 January 2013 17:07, Wanderer wrote:
    >
    > > Yes. I noticed this variability. I've been using the Totusoft Lan_Speedtest.exe to test some modules. I've tested through the wifi to our intranetand saw variations I believe do to network traffic. I also tried peer to peer and the write time actual got worse. I don't know if it has do to with the firewall or the hard drive speed or just Windows giving this process low priority. I also saw drop outs. So figuring out the metric for pass/fail will be interesting. I'll check into setting an ftp for this test.

    >
    >
    >
    > Why involve a protocol at all? I'd just create a socket
    >
    > (http://docs.python.org/3.3/library/socket.html) and measure how long,
    >
    > on average, it took to write a given number of arbitrary bytes (e.g.
    >
    > "This is a string" repeated a million times) to it and then read a
    >
    > given number of bytes back. That would be a relatively consistent
    >
    > metric, whereas if you try using FTP you'll run into issues, as
    >
    > already noted, where disk read/write speed and details of your FTP
    >
    > server implementation like compression or multiple network connections
    >
    > affect the result significantly.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Robert K. Day
    >
    >


    Thanks, I'll check out sockets. That's probably what I needed to search forinstead WLAN and Wi-Fi.
    Wanderer, Jan 28, 2013
    #7
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