XHTML replaced by XML ?

Discussion in 'XML' started by Martin Honnen, Nov 1, 2006.

  1. Alexandre Drolet wrote:
    > I have heard a lot of time that one day XML will replace XHTML for Web
    > page development; and that XHTML will not be used anymore.


    That sounds like nonsense as XHTML is an XML application so XHTML is XML
    already.
    The W3C wanted to replace HTML with XHTML by starting with XHTML 1.0 and
    allowing it to be authored and served backwards compatible with HTML
    browsers to move on to XHTML 1.1, mixed namespace XML documents with
    XHTML and/or MathML and/or SVG to (finally?) arrive at XHTML 2.0 and
    XForms (and/or MathML and/or SVG).
    But IE 7 is just out and still does not render XHTML 1.0 served as
    application/xhtml+xml. And even browser producers like Mozilla or Opera
    that for quite a while now have browsers that support treating XHTML as
    XML by parsing with an XML parser are trying to move "backwards"
    (compared to the above way the W3C envisioned) to "HTML 5" as an
    improvement of HTML 4.01 (e.g. improving HTML forms instead of replacing
    with XForms). See <http://www.whatwg.org>.




    --

    Martin Honnen
    http://JavaScript.FAQTs.com/
     
    Martin Honnen, Nov 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. Alexandre Drolet wrote:
    > I have heard a lot of time that one day XML will replace XHTML for Web
    > page development; and that XHTML will not be used anymore.
    > Since XHTML is still widely used,do you think that these "sayings" are
    > true ?


    The simple answer is "maybe".

    First off, XHTML *is* an XML language -- unlike HTML, which was based on
    SGML. And XHTML is indeed intended to be HTML's replacement, according
    to the W3C. So you've already taken the first step.

    Second, one of XHTML's advantages is that, as an XML language, it allows
    part of the document to be written in other languages -- SVG, for
    example - distinguished from the XHTML via namespaces. I do believe
    we're going to see increasing amounts of this, since XHTML still has
    most of the warts of HTML and extending into other languages will permit
    more interesting things to be done. So XHTML, if it persists, may wind
    up being not much more than a wrapper.

    Third, if you take a look at the new generation of web development --
    Ajax in particular -- you'll see that increasingly communication between
    the browser and the server is being done in XML, with XHTML used
    essentially as a rendering/interaction language rather than being the
    basis of the website's design. Even when normal (X)HTML is being served
    out, the servers are often based firmly on XML processing, and are just
    using stylesheets to translate that into (X)HTML for interaction with
    the user.

    > If yes, do you know a WYSIWYG web page editor than can generate XML +
    > XSL code instead of generating HTML + CSS code ?


    You're crossing two semi-compatable concepts there. XSL is a lot richer
    than HTML-plus-CSS. That richness means it can do things that the
    HTML-plus-CSS version can't do without scripting. But for that very
    reason, WYSIWYG is really not the right metaphor for editing it. (Think
    about what happens if the stylesheet says "Don't show me the purchase
    order if it's empty", and you empty it -- in a WYSIWYG system, how do
    you then get it back? Similarly, imaging typing into a form which is
    re-sorting itself as you're typing.) What's more commonly done is a
    multi-window solution -- work on the source and the stylesheet, and have
    the resulting rendering displayed in a separate window. For that, you
    don't actually need a particularly fancy tool; push refresh on an
    XSLT-aware browser to see what effect your changes have had.

    Since I'm not a WYSIWYG fan generally, I don't have recommendations. I
    know XMetaL, oXygen, and XMLSpy all said they were adding XSLT support
    at one point (though recent posts here suggest XMLSpy's implementation
    may have some bugs?), so you might want to start by checking their status.


    --
    () ASCII Ribbon Campaign | Joe Kesselman
    /\ Stamp out HTML e-mail! | System architexture and kinetic poetry
     
    Joe Kesselman, Nov 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. Martin Honnen

    Geoff Guest

    No! XHTML is an XML application which means it is a subset of XML and and
    has its own tags.

    -g
     
    Geoff, Nov 2, 2006
    #3
  4. By the way, fix the date on your machine...

    --
    () ASCII Ribbon Campaign | Joe Kesselman
    /\ Stamp out HTML e-mail! | System architexture and kinetic poetry
     
    Joe Kesselman, Nov 2, 2006
    #4
  5. I have heard a lot of time that one day XML will replace XHTML for Web
    page development; and that XHTML will not be used anymore.
    Since XHTML is still widely used,do you think that these "sayings" are
    true ?

    If yes, do you know a WYSIWYG web page editor than can generate XML +
    XSL code instead of generating HTML + CSS code ?

    Thank you

    Alexandre
     
    Alexandre Drolet, Nov 2, 2006
    #5
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