XML Editors

Discussion in 'XML' started by L. Scott M., Mar 2, 2007.

  1. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    from Microsoft.

    I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    formed".

    Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    want to worry about "tags".

    Thank you for your time,
    Scott M.
    L. Scott M., Mar 2, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 08:37:50 -0800, L. Scott M. wrote:

    > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > from Microsoft.
    >
    > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    > to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    > the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    > to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    > generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    > 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    > formed".
    >
    > Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    > capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    > works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    > want to worry about "tags".
    >
    > Thank you for your time,
    > Scott M.


    http://www.conglomerate.org/intro.html

    Does that look like it'll work?
    Michael Robinson, Mar 2, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. I'm not familiar with the "data grid view", so I have no comments on
    whether there's anything precisely equivalent. There are a lot of of
    portable XML editors, including several which happily plug into or work
    smoothly with Eclipse (which is in some sense the portable equivalent of
    Visual Studio)... but I tend to either edit my XML entirely manually (eg
    with Emacs XML mode) or entirely programmatically, so I haven't had
    reason to go looking for compromises between those extremes.


    Generating a schema from an XML file... "That trick rarely works". It's
    certainly possible to automatically generate ONE OF the possible schemas
    which describes a document, but that will generally be over-specific in
    some areas and under-specific in others. There are tools which will take
    a collection of XML files and attempt to derive a common schema that
    covers the whole set, but success still tends to be limited; at best you
    may get something that's close enough that it's worth using as a basis
    for manually taking it the rest of the way.

    Designing the schema first, then using it to guide creation of instance
    documents, is the ideal approach. If you aren't ready to do that...
    maybe you should be sticking with well-formed documents until the design
    settles down?
    Joseph Kesselman, Mar 2, 2007
    #3
  4. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    On Mar 2, 12:34 pm, Michael Robinson <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 08:37:50 -0800, L. Scott M. wrote:
    > > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > > from Microsoft.

    >
    > > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    > > to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    > > the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    > > to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    > > generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with

    I will take a look at it, it appears to look like it would work -
    Thanks !!!!!

    > > 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    > > formed".

    >
    > > Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    > > capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    > > works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    > > want to worry about "tags".

    >
    > > Thank you for your time,
    > > Scott M.

    >
    > http://www.conglomerate.org/intro.html
    >
    > Does that look like it'll work?
    L. Scott M., Mar 3, 2007
    #4
  5. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    On Mar 2, 12:34 pm, Joseph Kesselman <>
    wrote:
    > I'm not familiar with the "data grid view", so I have no comments on
    > whether there's anything precisely equivalent. There are a lot of of
    > portable XML editors, including several which happily plug into or work
    > smoothly with Eclipse (which is in some sense the portable equivalent of
    > Visual Studio)... but I tend to either edit my XML entirely manually (eg
    > with Emacs XML mode) or entirely programmatically, so I haven't had
    > reason to go looking for compromises between those extremes.
    >
    > Generating a schema from an XML file... "That trick rarely works". It's
    > certainly possible to automatically generate ONE OF the possible schemas
    > which describes a document, but that will generally be over-specific in
    > some areas and under-specific in others. There are tools which will take
    > a collection of XML files and attempt to derive a common schema that
    > covers the whole set, but success still tends to be limited; at best you
    > may get something that's close enough that it's worth using as a basis
    > for manually taking it the rest of the way.
    >
    > Designing the schema first, then using it to guide creation of instance
    > documents, is the ideal approach. If you aren't ready to do that...
    > maybe you should be sticking with well-formed documents until the design
    > settles down?


    Yeah, I was not too impressed with the schema generated by Microsoft
    Visual Studio either, but the concept intrigued me and does provide a
    foundation to start from - especially if one hand wrote an XML
    document.

    I will into Eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org/) and Conglomerate (http://
    www.conglomerate.org/intro.html), it looks like either or both may
    satisfy this requirement. Heck, maybe "emacs" would work, but I am
    not familiar with its abilities, it sounds text based, maybe like an
    ISPF mainframe editor but with added features could support entering
    of data in XML nodes....

    Thanks for the pointers,
    Scott M.


    Here are some links to pics that kind of depict what I was talking
    about....

    Using the XML and Schema Designers
    http://www.samspublishing.com/library/content.asp?b=Net_2003_21days&seqNum=136&rl=1
    http://www.samspublishing.com/content/images/bok_0672324210/elementLinks/12fig04.jpg
    http://www.samspublishing.com/content/images/bok_0672324210/elementLinks/12fig08.jpg
    http://www.samspublishing.com/content/images/bok_0672324210/elementLinks/12fig11.jpg
    L. Scott M., Mar 3, 2007
    #5
  6. L. Scott M.

    ray Guest

    On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 08:37:50 -0800, L. Scott M. wrote:

    > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > from Microsoft.
    >
    > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    > to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    > the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    > to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    > generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    > 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    > formed".
    >
    > Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    > capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    > works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    > want to worry about "tags".
    >
    > Thank you for your time,
    > Scott M.


    I don't know what distribution you're using (it is often helpful to
    include that), but I've installed an XML editor on my laptop - don't
    recall the name. I'd suggest you start up your package management tool and
    search for 'xml' or 'xml editor' and see what pops up. There were a couple
    in Ubuntu repositories.
    ray, Mar 3, 2007
    #6
  7. L. Scott M.

    ray Guest

    On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 18:44:44 -0700, ray wrote:

    > On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 08:37:50 -0800, L. Scott M. wrote:
    >
    >> First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    >> from Microsoft.
    >>
    >> I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    >> Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    >> to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    >> the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    >> to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    >> generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    >> 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    >> formed".
    >>
    >> Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    >> capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    >> works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    >> want to worry about "tags".
    >>
    >> Thank you for your time,
    >> Scott M.

    >
    > I don't know what distribution you're using (it is often helpful to
    > include that), but I've installed an XML editor on my laptop - don't
    > recall the name. I'd suggest you start up your package management tool and
    > search for 'xml' or 'xml editor' and see what pops up. There were a couple
    > in Ubuntu repositories.



    Just checked - it is 'kxml'.
    ray, Mar 3, 2007
    #7
  8. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    On Mar 2, 8:44 pm, ray <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 08:37:50 -0800, L. Scott M. wrote:
    > > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > > from Microsoft.

    >
    > > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    > > to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    > > the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    > > to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    > > generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    > > 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    > > formed".

    >
    > > Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    > > capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    > > works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    > > want to worry about "tags".

    >
    > > Thank you for your time,
    > > Scott M.

    >
    > I don't know what distribution you're using (it is often helpful to
    > include that), but I've installed an XML editor on my laptop - don't
    > recall the name. I'd suggest you start up your package management tool and
    > search for 'xml' or 'xml editor' and see what pops up. There were a couple
    > in Ubuntu repositories.


    Sorry about that installed SUSE 10.2 on my machine....

    Just spent half the night messing with "conglomerate", guess I am
    missing something, plus reading one of their numerous "read me files"
    it said that 0.9.1 not to expect too much......

    duh, I had gone through the "Package Groups", "Search" in YaST on XML
    brought up a whole slew of stuff, there went an evening.

    Really love the learning curve, getting a "tar" file then trying to
    figure out where to put it, which switch to use, where to put the
    install and then oops mistyped something, where did it
    go.......... F@$% %^&&^$#^%# ........... oops that is how one
    archives it tape, figure this all out but cannot compile or
    something..........
    ..........then after four hours, a noble guide informs this lost soul
    that it is on their machine already, even found "conglomerate", check
    the boxes, pull the CD's and away we go, I hope.... It is midnight
    there are a few more hours left....

    Would like to find a brain dead site, for example this "tar"
    thing.....
    Copy files to or restore files from an archive medium. Options need
    not be preceded by "-" (though they may be). The exception to this
    rule is when your are using a long-style option. - Linux In a
    Nutshell page 429. I then got to read three pages of options all to
    figure out how to use "tar", my GUI Archive Manager would export, but
    then the question was to where, my local user, root, under /usr/
    bin....... where is the "politically correct" rule of thumb location
    for downloaded apps ?

    Installing as I type here, thanks oh great masters of the "tar" and
    the "grep" - seriously thanks, lets see how this goes,

    Scott M.
    L. Scott M., Mar 3, 2007
    #8
  9. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    Okay, I like the KXML Editor, interesting in that I am using GNOME yet
    this is a KDE tool....
    "conglomerate" has a little ways to go, maybe it can be configured
    but....

    Thanks again,
    Scott M.
    L. Scott M., Mar 3, 2007
    #9
  10. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    On Mar 3, 1:08 am, "L. Scott M." <> wrote:
    > Okay, I like the KXML Editor, interesting in that I am using GNOME yet
    > this is a KDE tool....
    > "conglomerate" has a little ways to go, maybe it can be configured
    > but....
    >
    > Thanks again,
    > Scott M.


    Still a tabular format would be helpful where the elements containing
    data vs elements would be displayed like a table - for example the
    "row / node" "NAME" would look like this:

    FIRST MIDDLE LAST
    Scooby none Doo
    Name none Changed

    <XMLROOT>
    <PEOPLE>
    <NAME>
    <FIRST>Scooby</FIRST>
    <MIDDLE>none</MIDDLE>
    <LAST>Doo</LAST>
    </NAME>
    <NAME>
    <FIRST>Name</FIRST>
    <MIDDLE>none</MIDDLE>
    <LAST>Changed</LAST>
    </NAME>
    <ADDRESS>
    <LOCATION01>222 Normal Street</LOCATION01>
    <CITY>Mayberry</CITY>
    <STATE>NC</STATE>
    <ZIP>55555</ZIP>
    <TYPE>STREET</TYPE>
    </ADDRESS>
    </PEOPLE>
    </XMLROOT>
    L. Scott M., Mar 3, 2007
    #10
  11. L. Scott M.

    George Bina Guest

    oXygen XML Editor offers you all you asked for:
    - editing in source mode
    - editing in grid mode
    - generate schema from XML files
    and a lot more, see
    http://www.oxygenxml.com

    Best Regards,
    George
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    George Cristian Bina
    <oXygen/> XML Editor, Schema Editor and XSLT Editor/Debugger
    http://www.oxygenxml.com


    On Mar 2, 6:37 pm, "L. Scott M." <> wrote:
    > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > from Microsoft.
    >
    > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    > to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    > the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    > to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    > generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    > 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    > formed".
    >
    > Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    > capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    > works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    > want to worry about "tags".
    >
    > Thank you for your time,
    > Scott M.
    George Bina, Mar 3, 2007
    #11
  12. L. Scott M. wrote:
    > Still a tabular format would be helpful where the elements containing
    > data vs elements would be displayed like a table


    Suggestion: Edit as a table, then write a bit of code to import that
    into XML. The fact that XML is your shared/portable representation does
    always not make it the best representation to use when actually working
    with the data.


    --
    () ASCII Ribbon Campaign | Joe Kesselman
    /\ Stamp out HTML e-mail! | System architexture and kinetic poetry
    Joe Kesselman, Mar 3, 2007
    #12
  13. L. Scott M.

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <>, George
    Bina ('') wrote:

    > oXygen XML Editor offers you all you asked for:
    > - editing in source mode
    > - editing in grid mode
    > - generate schema from XML files
    > and a lot more, see
    > http://www.oxygenxml.com


    Seconded. Not free, not open source, but an excellent product nevertheless.
    Good integration with the Eclipse IDE, if you use that.

    --
    (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    -----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
    Version: 3.1
    GP/CS s++: a++ C+++ ULBVCS*++++$ L+++ P--- E+>++ W+++ N++ K w--(---)
    M- !d- PS++ PE-- Y+ PGP !t 5? X+ !R b++ !DI D G- e++ h*(-) r++ y+++
    ------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------
    Simon Brooke, Mar 3, 2007
    #13
  14. L. Scott M.

    s. keeling Guest

    ["Followup-To:" header set to alt.os.linux.]
    L. Scott M. <>:
    > On Mar 2, 8:44 pm, ray <> wrote:
    > > On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 08:37:50 -0800, L. Scott M. wrote:
    > > > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > > > from Microsoft.

    > >
    > > > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > > > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability

    > >
    > > I don't know what distribution you're using (it is often helpful to

    >
    > Sorry about that installed SUSE 10.2 on my machine....
    >
    > Really love the learning curve, getting a "tar" file then trying to
    > figure out where to put it, which switch to use, where to put the


    Assuming "blah.tar.gz" or "blah.tgz":

    i) To see what's in it:

    tar tvzf blah.tgz # add "| less" if more than a
    # screenful.

    ii) To extract it:

    cd /some/where/safe # Ie. "cd" takes you $HOME, "mkdir dwn"
    # creates $HOME/dwn, now "cd dwn"

    tar xzf /path/to/blah.tgz # dumps contents into $HOME/dwn

    Or, to pull a single file out of blah.tgz, just name that file
    on the end of the command line. You get the name from the
    "tvzf" output.

    > Copy files to or restore files from an archive medium. Options need


    iii) Create compressed tar file:

    cd
    tar czf blah.tgz dwn # archives and gzips all contents of
    # $HOME/dwn into $HOME/blah.tgz

    > not be preceded by "-" (though they may be). The exception to this
    > rule is when your are using a long-style option. - Linux In a
    > Nutshell page 429. I then got to read three pages of options all to
    > figure out how to use "tar", my GUI Archive Manager would export, but
    > then the question was to where, my local user, root, under /usr/
    > bin....... where is the "politically correct" rule of thumb location
    > for downloaded apps ?


    Either in your $HOME if they're just for you, or in /usr/local if for
    system wide use.

    > Installing as I type here, thanks oh great masters of the "tar" and
    > the "grep" - seriously thanks, lets see how this goes,


    "tar" is quite versatile, which means a lot of options for special
    cases. Most people will never need to use the more obscure ones. One
    relatively obscure one they might need or want is "bzip
    compression/decompression", which is the "j" (or --bzip2) switch
    instead of "z" (or --compress, --uncompress). bzip arguably does
    better compression than gzip, though it may also be more resource
    intensive (better compression == slower).

    As for XML, I've done a bit with it but only in text editors (emacs)
    which isn't what you're looking for. I think I prefer to avoid XML
    for now. :)


    --
    Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
    (*) http://www.spots.ab.ca/~keeling Linux Counter #80292
    - - http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1855.html Please, don't Cc: me.
    Spammers! http://www.spots.ab.ca/~keeling/emails.html
    s. keeling, Mar 3, 2007
    #14
  15. L. Scott M.

    ray Guest


    >
    > Sorry about that installed SUSE 10.2 on my machine....


    YMMV but I've found Suse to be somewhat difficult to work with and very
    slow on normal software installs, updates, etc. I find that Debian derived
    systems like Debian, Ubuntu, Elive suit me much better.

    >
    > Just spent half the night messing with "conglomerate", guess I am
    > missing something, plus reading one of their numerous "read me files"
    > it said that 0.9.1 not to expect too much......
    >
    > duh, I had gone through the "Package Groups", "Search" in YaST on XML
    > brought up a whole slew of stuff, there went an evening.
    >
    > Really love the learning curve, getting a "tar" file then trying to
    > figure out where to put it, which switch to use, where to put the
    > install and then oops mistyped something, where did it
    > go.......... F@$% %^&&^$#^%# ........... oops that is how one
    > archives it tape, figure this all out but cannot compile or
    > something..........
    > .........then after four hours, a noble guide informs this lost soul
    > that it is on their machine already, even found "conglomerate", check
    > the boxes, pull the CD's and away we go, I hope.... It is midnight
    > there are a few more hours left....
    >
    > Would like to find a brain dead site, for example this "tar"
    > thing.....
    > Copy files to or restore files from an archive medium. Options need
    > not be preceded by "-" (though they may be). The exception to this
    > rule is when your are using a long-style option. - Linux In a
    > Nutshell page 429. I then got to read three pages of options all to
    > figure out how to use "tar", my GUI Archive Manager would export, but
    > then the question was to where, my local user, root, under /usr/
    > bin....... where is the "politically correct" rule of thumb location
    > for downloaded apps ?
    >
    > Installing as I type here, thanks oh great masters of the "tar" and
    > the "grep" - seriously thanks, lets see how this goes,
    >
    > Scott M.
    ray, Mar 3, 2007
    #15
  16. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    On Mar 3, 2:51 am, "George Bina" <> wrote:
    > oXygen XML Editor offers you all you asked for:
    > - editing in source mode
    > - editing in grid mode
    > - generate schema from XML files
    > and a lot more, seehttp://www.oxygenxml.com
    >
    > Best Regards,
    > George
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    > George Cristian Bina
    > <oXygen/> XML Editor, Schema Editor and XSLT Editor/Debuggerhttp://www.oxygenxml.com
    >
    > On Mar 2, 6:37 pm, "L. Scott M." <> wrote:
    >
    > > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > > from Microsoft.

    >
    > > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    > > to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    > > the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    > > to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    > > generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    > > 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    > > formed".

    >
    > > Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    > > capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    > > works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    > > want to worry about "tags".

    >
    > > Thank you for your time,
    > > Scott M.


    Yes, oXygen (http://www.oxygenxml.com) sounds like just what I want
    with the grid views and the price is reasonable (especially compared
    to MS solutions).

    Folks thanks again for all your assistance and options,
    Scott M.
    L. Scott M., Mar 3, 2007
    #16
  17. L. Scott M.

    Guest

    Liquid XML Studio contains a comprehensive graphical XSD editor, and
    best of all its FREE. We've been using it for quite a bit as our
    company won't stump up the cash for xmlspy. Its done pretty much
    everything we've wanted it to, and our schemas are pretty complex. I
    think the url is http://www.liquid-technologies.com.

    Cheers James


    On Mar 3, 11:04 pm, "L. Scott M." <> wrote:
    > On Mar 3, 2:51 am, "George Bina" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > oXygen XMLEditoroffers you all you asked for:
    > > - editing in source mode
    > > - editing in grid mode
    > > - generate schema from XML files
    > > and a lot more, seehttp://www.oxygenxml.com

    >
    > > Best Regards,
    > > George
    > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    > > George Cristian Bina
    > > <oXygen/> XMLEditor, SchemaEditorand XSLTEditor/Debuggerhttp://www.oxygenxml.com

    >
    > > On Mar 2, 6:37 pm, "L. Scott M." <> wrote:

    >
    > > > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > > > from Microsoft.

    >
    > > > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > > > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    > > > to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    > > > the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    > > > to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    > > > generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    > > > 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    > > > formed".

    >
    > > > Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    > > > capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    > > > works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    > > > want to worry about "tags".

    >
    > > > Thank you for your time,
    > > > Scott M.

    >
    > Yes, oXygen (http://www.oxygenxml.com) sounds like just what I want
    > with the grid views and the price is reasonable (especially compared
    > to MS solutions).
    >
    > Folks thanks again for all your assistance and options,
    > Scott M.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -
    , Mar 4, 2007
    #17
  18. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    On Mar 4, 12:08 pm, wrote:
    > Liquid XML Studio contains a comprehensive graphical XSD editor, and
    > best of all its FREE. We've been using it for quite a bit as our
    > company won't stump up the cash for xmlspy. Its done pretty much
    > everything we've wanted it to, and our schemas are pretty complex. I
    > think the url ishttp://www.liquid-technologies.com.
    >
    > Cheers James
    >
    > On Mar 3, 11:04 pm, "L. Scott M." <> wrote:
    >
    > > On Mar 3, 2:51 am, "George Bina" <> wrote:

    >
    > > > oXygen XMLEditoroffers you all you asked for:
    > > > - editing in source mode
    > > > - editing in grid mode
    > > > - generate schema from XML files
    > > > and a lot more, seehttp://www.oxygenxml.com

    >
    > > > Best Regards,
    > > > George
    > > > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    > > > George Cristian Bina
    > > > <oXygen/> XMLEditor, SchemaEditorand XSLTEditor/Debuggerhttp://www.oxygenxml.com

    >
    > > > On Mar 2, 6:37 pm, "L. Scott M." <> wrote:

    >
    > > > > First I am just starting off using Linux, trying to wean myself away
    > > > > from Microsoft.

    >
    > > > > I have some XML files that I have been supporting using Microsoft
    > > > > Visual Studio 2003/2005, within this enterprise they have the ability
    > > > > to edit XML files as standard text and they have the ability to edit
    > > > > the file in a "data grid" view. The "data grid" provides an easy way
    > > > > to enter data within XML nodes. I know that VS 2003 will also
    > > > > generate a schema "xsd" file from an "xml" file - have not tried with
    > > > > 2005. Of course it also checks the XML document for being "well
    > > > > formed".

    >
    > > > > Does the Linux community have a package that can provide the same
    > > > > capabilities as the MS nemisis ? Yes, I do know that cutting/pasting
    > > > > works but when one is transcribing notes into a document one does not
    > > > > want to worry about "tags".

    >
    > > > > Thank you for your time,
    > > > > Scott M.

    >
    > > Yes, oXygen (http://www.oxygenxml.com) sounds like just what I want
    > > with the grid views and the price is reasonable (especially compared
    > > to MS solutions).

    >
    > > Folks thanks again for all your assistance and options,
    > > Scott M.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > - Show quoted text -



    http://www.liquid-technologies.com/Download.aspx
    http://www.liquid-technologies.com/Purchase.aspx

    Not sure what registration means but it seems to be a thirty day
    trial....
    L. Scott M., Mar 4, 2007
    #18
  19. L. Scott M.

    L. Scott M. Guest

    Here is a demo of oXygen's XML editors grid functionality for those of
    you who are interested. It is a little different than Microsoft's
    Visual Studio XML capabilities but the grid concept does make entering
    data into XML files a lot easier, not to mention being able to sort
    the nodes. I will probably cough up the money for the individual
    license - give me a few more weeks of annoyance, till the next time I
    have to hunt for the node/element to insert data.

    http://www.oxygenxml.com/demo/GridEditor/GridEditor.html
    L. Scott M., Mar 8, 2007
    #19
  20. L. Scott M.

    Dick Guest

    L. Scott M. <> wrote:

    > Here is a demo of oXygen's XML editors grid functionality for those of
    > you who are interested. It is a little different than Microsoft's
    > Visual Studio XML capabilities but the grid concept does make entering
    > data into XML files a lot easier, not to mention being able to sort
    > the nodes. I will probably cough up the money for the individual
    > license - give me a few more weeks of annoyance, till the next time I
    > have to hunt for the node/element to insert data.
    >
    > http://www.oxygenxml.com/demo/GridEditor/GridEditor.html


    Hi,

    I wrote a free simple XML editor wich is dedicated to correcting and
    validating XML. It has besides a source view also a treetable view where
    you can "tagfree" edit values. In this view you don't have to bother
    escaping XML reserved characters like the ampersand character.
    The editor is written in java, so should work on all platforms.
    You can find it on http://www.donkeydevelopment.com
    Regards
    D.Deneer
    Dick, Mar 8, 2007
    #20
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