bit shifts across array elements

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by fermineutron, Nov 4, 2006.

  1. fermineutron

    fermineutron Guest

    Lets say i have array

    unsigned long X[4];

    Now, i want to shift right bits in the array by 5. that is the lowest 5
    bits of element N will become the highest 5 bits of element N-1. the
    lowest 5 bits of 0th element are lost.

    what is the best way to do this?

    My C reference book does not go in detail on preserving the bits which
    are lost during bitshifts.

    X[3]=X[3]>>5;
    but what is X[2] in this case?

    Also is there a way to determine the count of the most significant
    non-zero bit in a variable?
    for example in the case

    0010010101010010

    answer would be 14. This can be done by repeatedly testing the variable
    storing above value against 2^N untill 2^N is greater than X. The count
    of most significant bit would be N-1, assuming the right ost bit is in
    0th position, but is there a more efficient way to do this?

    In both cases timing is critical.

    Thanks ahead.
     
    fermineutron, Nov 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. fermineutron

    fermineutron Guest

    I guess i could do the following to determine most significan non-zero
    bit count:
    T stores the value to be tested.
    n=0;
    while(T>0){
    T=T>>1;
    n++;
    }

    is there a beter way?
     
    fermineutron, Nov 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. How about:

    X[0] >>= 5;
    int i;
    for(i = 1; i < arraylen; i++){
    /* Move the least significant bits of X to the upper bits of
    X[i-1] */
    X[i-1] |= X << (8*sizeof(unsigned long) - 5);
    X >>=5;
    }
    I use the following:

    for(i = 0;n >> i; i++);

    i is now the position of the most significant bit (assuming the far
    right is bit 1)
     
    Chris Johnson, Nov 4, 2006
    #3
  4. fermineutron

    Eric Sosman Guest

    Maybe. Timings are highly machine-dependent, and a technique
    that whizzes on one system may wheeze on another. A few ideas:

    1) If you know the number of bits in a T-type value you can
    do a binary search. For example, if T is a sixteen-bit unsigned
    integer you could do

    int n = 0;
    if (T > 0x00FF) { n = 8; T >>= 8; }
    if (T > 0x000F) { n += 4; T >>= 4; }
    if (T > 0x0003) { n += 2; T >>= 2; }
    n += T >> 1;

    1a) Even if you don't know the number of bits but do know a
    lower bound, you can use a "big bite" linear search followed by
    a binary search as above. For example, if T is an unsigned integer
    known to be at least sixteen bits wide but possibly wider,

    int n = 0;
    while (T > 0xFFFF) { n += 16; T >>= 16; }
    /* ... followed by binary search as above */

    2) Use a "big bite" linear search to reduce T to a convenient
    range and then index a precomputed table with the reduced T.

    3) A trick mentioned on this forum within the past few weeks:
    Convert T to a floating-point type and extract the exponent.

    Before spending much time on these or any other alternatives,
    be sure you have solid *evidence* for the criticality of the
    timing. Suspicion is not enough.
     
    Eric Sosman, Nov 4, 2006
    #4
  5. fermineutron

    fermineutron Guest

    Thanks everyone,
    all replies were very helpfull.
     
    fermineutron, Nov 4, 2006
    #5
  6. Also is there a way to determine the count of the most significant

    http://graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html#IntegerLogDeBruijn

     
    Samuel Stearley, Nov 5, 2006
    #6


  7. The restriction of unpadded integers and 8 bit bytes only is
    unnecessary...

    X[0] >>= 5;
    for(i = 1; i < arraylen; i++)
    {
    X[i-1] |= X * ((-1ul >> 5) + 1);
    X >>=5;
    }

    [Many compilers will optimise the * to a shift, so you gain portability
    without losing efficiency.]
     
    Peter Nilsson, Nov 6, 2006
    #7
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