[OT] Friendly warning - BACK UP TODAY!

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Richard Heathfield, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. Richard Heathfield

    jmcgill Guest

    The stuff I'd go to jail, into debt, or get fired for losing, easily
    fits on the smallest of media.

    The stuff I get paid to create, resides on carefully managed storage
    devices which are backed up in a fully accountable fashion, by people
    who get paid to do that.

    My personal stuff, I manage to not get myself in a situation that I
    could not duplicate. There is relatively little data that must be cared
    for to any special degree. I do make an effort to avoid software that
    is tied to a specific piece of hardware, or which must be
    "authenticated" with a finite authentication resource, largely for this
    reason.

    A fire or a flood destroying any of my computers (both of which I have
    experienced), or the airport security breaking my notebook (happened in
    Oakland), simply does not concern me beyond the credit card damage
    involved in replacing the hardware.

    Now, a major fire or quake or similar disaster at my office, would be
    annoying, but then, we put a really large amount of money into ensuring
    that such a disaster is recoverable. As for less-disastrous recovery,
    we routinely request, and receive, snapshots of various things.

    My point is, most people have one or two levels of things they really
    should backup, and they should not allow the daunting task of backing up
    hundreds of gigabytes of garbage, or readily replaceable data, to
    dissuade them from backing up the couple hundred kilobytes or the couple
    megabytes that would really be a problem if lost. But I see people in
    this situation all the time. Practically everyone I have ever heard
    bring up the whole question of "backup", seems to have been of the
    opinion that if it is difficult or expensive to backup *everything*,
    then *nothing* gets saved.

    I usually point out that every document they have ever written in their
    entire life would probably fit on much less than a CDR. The works of
    Shakespeare fits in 5 Megs, for crying in a bucket.

    But people will fail to backup their business records because they
    cannot also backup their Spongebob Squarepants collection?
     
    jmcgill, Aug 11, 2006
    #21
    1. Advertisements

  2. Richard Heathfield

    websnarf Guest

    That's why he said he uses CVS too.
     
    websnarf, Aug 12, 2006
    #22
    1. Advertisements

  3. Oh, yes. I've more than once seen development systems fail and be
    diagnosed as component damage through overheating. S/W dev (or whoever)
    says "I can't understand that - I had the case covers off and was
    blasting it with a huge fan". Airflow and cooling engineers respond
    with "Well what the Hell do you expect to happen if you take the covers
    off and blast it with a huge fan?".

    A professionally designed *system* (as opposed to group of components)
    whose insides have only ever been twiddled with in ways approved by the
    manufacturer should do better in the heat with all its covers on (as
    long as it's within the supported ambient temperature and humidity
    ranges). If it doesn't, you've got a badly designed system.

    A "white box" created by an integrator taking a random case and
    sticking things in it, or a "professional" box with unofficial mods
    (particularly ones which involve internal cables), will probably do
    better opened and blasted as Tom describes.
     
    J. J. Farrell, Aug 12, 2006
    #23
  4. Richard Heathfield

    Len Philpot Guest

    No laughing here. I have a second hard disk to which I run scheduled
    differentials Mon-Sat and a full each Sunday during the wee hours. It's
    saved my bacon more than once. Of course, I'd like a pair of SDLT320x6
    Sun L100s like I administer at work (attached to my own Sun Fire V880,
    of course), but I'm a little short of $185,000 right now... :)
     
    Len Philpot, Aug 12, 2006
    #24
  5. Richard Heathfield

    Tom St Denis Guest

    This isn't supported by reality. My Titan 550 is a "server case"
    designed by "professionals" and the airflow of the case [even with the
    cables tucked away] is less than adequate for the design.

    I can readily observe the temperature of the devices going down. How
    exactly is this bad? I agree it doesn't scale and a better solution
    would be required if you had a farm of these. But for the lowly
    individual it's an economical and very effective solution.

    I've seen pro 1U and 2U boxes die of heatdeath in air conditioned rooms
    too.

    I think the moral of the story is you have to monitor temps actively
    and not just when things die.

    Tom
     
    Tom St Denis, Aug 12, 2006
    #25
  6. Richard Heathfield

    MQ Guest

    Most computer accessories stored won't offer you this either,
    especially if you set it up yourself. I agree, a desk fan is cheaper
    and more effective than some fancy cooling system

    MQ
     
    MQ, Aug 12, 2006
    #26
  7. I assume you're saying my experiences weren't real. I wasn't lying.
    You miss the point. A particular case doesn't make it a designed
    *system*. I don't know what is meant by a "server case designed by
    professionals"; the case is just one of many components, and not any
    more or less important than other aspects of the system. A system with
    designed airflow has tight constraints on what goes where, including
    cables, baffles and heatsinks designed for where the components are,
    with cables routed to fit the overall *system* airflow design.
    It isn't, of course.
    Exactly as I said in the paragraph you snipped - if the system isn't a
    professionally designed and integrated one, it's probably going to be
    better off opened and blasted with air.
    Then they're not professionally designed systems being operated in an
    approved way (or if they claim to be you should get your money back).
    Of course, though you should only need to worry about a fully and
    properly designed system if the ambient temperature and humidity are
    outside the supported range.
     
    J. J. Farrell, Aug 12, 2006
    #27
  8. Richard Heathfield

    goose Guest

    <snipped OT stuff>

    I'm not generally one to bemoan the topicality
    of anything, but debating computer-cooling methods
    in such depth on clc is certainly pushing it, isn't
    it?

    I'm sure there are better (more informed) groups
    for such things.

    goose,
     
    goose, Aug 12, 2006
    #28
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.