1 day gnu, whole life gnu?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Peter, Jan 10, 2005.

  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Hi
    If my project is under GNU license now, can i change it to
    commerical license for the later version?

    thanks
    from Peter
    Peter, Jan 10, 2005
    #1
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  2. On 9 Jan 2005 18:53:40 -0800
    (Peter) wrote:

    > Hi
    > If my project is under GNU license now, can i change it to
    > commerical license for the later version?


    IANAL. That being said, here is what i think to know:

    Only if each and every copyright holder (= everyone who has ever
    contributed so much as a single line of code) explicitly agrees, and you
    will always have the last GPL'ed version floating around, which will and
    can evolve on it's own.

    --
    In pioneer days they used oxen for heavy pulling, and when one ox
    couldn't budge a log, they didn't try to grow a larger ox. We shouldn't
    be trying for bigger computers, but for more systems of computers.
    --- Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper
    Stefan Schulz, Jan 10, 2005
    #2
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  3. Peter

    Frank Guest

    IANAL, but in theory, you own the code, so you can license it pretty much
    however you desire. That being said, a change of license only affects your
    users when they change their code. A user currently holding a copy with
    GNU is still bound only by GNU for that version, even if you release a new
    version under a different license.

    HTH

    -Frank

    On 9 Jan 2005 18:53:40 -0800, Peter <> wrote:

    > Hi
    > If my project is under GNU license now, can i change it to
    > commerical license for the later version?
    >
    > thanks
    > from Peter
    Frank, Jan 10, 2005
    #3
  4. Peter wrote:

    > If my project is under GNU license now, can i change it to
    > commerical license for the later version?


    If all relevant rights holders agree, you can license your program under
    whatever license or licenses you choose, either sequentially or
    concurrently. (I.e. you could conceivably offer the same program under
    both GNU and a commercial license at the same time.) If anyone but you
    has contributed intellectual property to your program in any form or
    amount (and maybe even if not), then you would be wise to consult an
    attorney. I am not one.


    John Bollinger
    John C. Bollinger, Jan 10, 2005
    #4
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