AD/ADAM and application settings storage

Discussion in 'ASP .Net Security' started by mfaulcon, Jul 27, 2006.

  1. mfaulcon

    mfaulcon Guest

    Greetings, all.

    I am developing a windows forms intranet app that uses AD for authentication
    and access control. There are some application settings, however, that I'd
    like to persist, along the lines of aspnet's personalization paradigm. Since
    this as a smart client app, and the users may frequently access it from
    different machines, I need this information stored on the backend, rather
    than at the point of use.

    AD/ADAM seems like the logical palce to do this, since it fits the bill, or
    possibly the aspnet personalization structure. The microsoft ADAM FAQ lists
    this same configuration as one of the primary reasons for the development of
    ADAM, but I can't seem to find any usage examples, particularly on the setup
    and configuration of ADAM, or of how the application settings would be
    accessed and stored.

    any guidance that someone could provide on this would be greatly appreciated.

    Mark Faulcon
     
    mfaulcon, Jul 27, 2006
    #1
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  2. The way to think about ADAM as an application developer in this scenario is
    sort of like an empty SQL server database. Off the bat, it is just a
    network endpoint that you can use to read and write data, but using the LDAP
    protocol instead of SQL.

    However, in order to get any useful data in and out of your ADAM store, you
    first need some schema to support the data you want to use. In LDAP, data
    is arranged hierarchically, like a file system, instead of in tables made of
    rows and columns. Data is stored in objects that contain attributes (which
    can contain multiple values and can also contain pointers to other objects,
    forming foreign key relationships).

    Probably the most important thing here is to come up with a design for your
    schema and get that into an ADAM instance. Reading and writing the data
    won't be a big deal once you've done that, although you'll have to figure
    out your security model for how that should work.

    There are some books that may help you here, including mine, which contains
    a chapter with some high level useful stuff on schema design, and Joe
    Richard's Active Directory 3rd Edition (don't get 2nd!), which contains a
    lot more details and examples.

    Joe K.

    --
    Joe Kaplan-MS MVP Directory Services Programming
    Co-author of "The .NET Developer's Guide to Directory Services Programming"
    http://www.directoryprogramming.net
    --
    "mfaulcon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Greetings, all.
    >
    > I am developing a windows forms intranet app that uses AD for
    > authentication
    > and access control. There are some application settings, however, that I'd
    > like to persist, along the lines of aspnet's personalization paradigm.
    > Since
    > this as a smart client app, and the users may frequently access it from
    > different machines, I need this information stored on the backend, rather
    > than at the point of use.
    >
    > AD/ADAM seems like the logical palce to do this, since it fits the bill,
    > or
    > possibly the aspnet personalization structure. The microsoft ADAM FAQ
    > lists
    > this same configuration as one of the primary reasons for the development
    > of
    > ADAM, but I can't seem to find any usage examples, particularly on the
    > setup
    > and configuration of ADAM, or of how the application settings would be
    > accessed and stored.
    >
    > any guidance that someone could provide on this would be greatly
    > appreciated.
    >
    > Mark Faulcon
     
    Joe Kaplan \(MVP - ADSI\), Jul 27, 2006
    #2
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  3. just came in...

    maybe interesting for you

    http://blogs.msdn.com/azman/archive/2006/07/26/679549.aspx



    > The way to think about ADAM as an application developer in this
    > scenario is sort of like an empty SQL server database. Off the bat,
    > it is just a network endpoint that you can use to read and write data,
    > but using the LDAP protocol instead of SQL.
    >
    > However, in order to get any useful data in and out of your ADAM
    > store, you first need some schema to support the data you want to use.
    > In LDAP, data is arranged hierarchically, like a file system, instead
    > of in tables made of rows and columns. Data is stored in objects that
    > contain attributes (which can contain multiple values and can also
    > contain pointers to other objects, forming foreign key relationships).
    >
    > Probably the most important thing here is to come up with a design for
    > your schema and get that into an ADAM instance. Reading and writing
    > the data won't be a big deal once you've done that, although you'll
    > have to figure out your security model for how that should work.
    >
    > There are some books that may help you here, including mine, which
    > contains a chapter with some high level useful stuff on schema design,
    > and Joe Richard's Active Directory 3rd Edition (don't get 2nd!), which
    > contains a lot more details and examples.
    >
    > Joe K.
    >
     
    Dominick Baier, Jul 27, 2006
    #3
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