Advice on design approach and principles

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Mr Gordonz, Aug 4, 2003.

  1. Mr Gordonz

    Mr Gordonz Guest

    Hi All,

    I am building a site that will be used by different types of users, and each
    type of user will do similar, but substantially different, things. My
    question is a general one: what is the "best" (or at least a good) approach
    to the design of the site.

    For example:

    1. I want to display a menu/nav bar at the top of the page, and while some
    options are common to all types of user, some are unique to one user type.
    At the moment I am using a User Control, and it has three separate Panel
    controls. In the Load event (of the User Control), I check the Usertype
    (stored in a Session variable), and display the Panel which has the menu
    options relevant to that user type (and also hide the other panels). It
    works just fine, but it doesn't seem a very "elegant" solution.

    2. All user types can go to an "Edit My Account" page. But the info that
    is stored in the database for each user type is different: different fields
    in
    different tables, therefore different controls on the Account page. Which
    is
    better: completely separate pages for each user type (easy to do, but lots
    of pages) vs. one page for all, and use my trick of hidden panels (less
    pages, more code). I suspect there are other approaches, but I'm not
    sure what they might be.

    I am interested to hear from anyone who has ideas/opinions/experience
    regarding this "question". I realize that I am really asking a very broad
    question about solution architecture, but I am now 35 years old and I don't
    have the time (or the money!) to go back to Uni and study, so I'll happily
    settle for some quick tips and pointers from the experts! ;-)

    Thanks in advance,

    Cheers,

    Mr Gordonz
     
    Mr Gordonz, Aug 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. 1) I think this is a very elegant solution you've come up with. This is the
    way I would have done it. I can think of other ways you could have done it
    but none that I would consider "better."

    2) Without knowing more about your app, the panel approach seems reasonable,
    especially since it keeps things pretty consistent with the coding style of
    your menu control.

    --
    I hope this helps,
    Steve C. Orr, MCSD
    http://Steve.Orr.net


    "Mr Gordonz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I am building a site that will be used by different types of users, and

    each
    > type of user will do similar, but substantially different, things. My
    > question is a general one: what is the "best" (or at least a good)

    approach
    > to the design of the site.
    >
    > For example:
    >
    > 1. I want to display a menu/nav bar at the top of the page, and while

    some
    > options are common to all types of user, some are unique to one user type.
    > At the moment I am using a User Control, and it has three separate Panel
    > controls. In the Load event (of the User Control), I check the Usertype
    > (stored in a Session variable), and display the Panel which has the menu
    > options relevant to that user type (and also hide the other panels). It
    > works just fine, but it doesn't seem a very "elegant" solution.
    >
    > 2. All user types can go to an "Edit My Account" page. But the info

    that
    > is stored in the database for each user type is different: different

    fields
    > in
    > different tables, therefore different controls on the Account page. Which
    > is
    > better: completely separate pages for each user type (easy to do, but lots
    > of pages) vs. one page for all, and use my trick of hidden panels (less
    > pages, more code). I suspect there are other approaches, but I'm not
    > sure what they might be.
    >
    > I am interested to hear from anyone who has ideas/opinions/experience
    > regarding this "question". I realize that I am really asking a very broad
    > question about solution architecture, but I am now 35 years old and I

    don't
    > have the time (or the money!) to go back to Uni and study, so I'll happily
    > settle for some quick tips and pointers from the experts! ;-)
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Mr Gordonz
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Steve C. Orr, MCSD, Aug 4, 2003
    #2
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