Array-problems [newbie]

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Tim Cambrant, Aug 28, 2003.

  1. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Cambrant Guest

    Hi, I've been experimenting with C for about a week now and I've read the
    tutorial at http://www.geocities.com/tom_torfs/cintro.html, so i feel quite
    sure of the syntax and the program flow now. However, I don't seem to have
    the right understanding of how arrays really work, since this test-program
    of mine doesn't compile right.

    -------------

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <string.h>

    int parse_args(char cmd_arg[]);

    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
    int i, arg_check;

    for (i=1; i < argc; i++) {
    arg_check = parse_args(argv);

    if (arg_check == 1)
    printf("Error: %s is an unknown command.", argv);
    }

    return 0;
    }

    int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    {
    switch(cmd_arg) {
    case 'test1':
    printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    return 0;
    case 'test2':
    printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    return 0;
    default:
    return 1;
    }
    }

    -------------

    When I try to compile this i get these errors:

    $ gcc -Wall test.c -o test
    test.c: In function `parse_args':
    test.c:22: switch quantity not an integer
    test.c:23: character constant too long
    test.c:26: character constant too long
    test.c:24: warning: unreachable code at beginning of switch statement
    $

    I think it all depends on the fact that I don't know how to format the code
    correctly when handling arrays (Where to use "array[]", "array[x]" or
    "array"). I think I can recall having problems with the same thing a year
    ago when giving C++ a go. What am I doing wrong?

    I think you'll understand the programs purpose, so I won't have to explain
    it.

    --
    Tim Cambrant
    <tim at cambrant dot com>
    Tim Cambrant, Aug 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. Tim Cambrant

    foo bar Guest

    > int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    > {
    > switch(cmd_arg) {
    > case 'test1':
    > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > return 0;
    > case 'test2':
    > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > return 0;
    > default:
    > return 1;
    > }
    > }


    There are a few errors in your above code.

    First, string constants are enclosed with double-qoutes "test1".
    Character constants are enclosed with single-qoutes 'c'.

    You can't test for strings in switch-statements. The case-expression must be
    constant value.
    Even though "test1" is a string constant, its value is the address to the
    first character in the un-named
    character array "test1". Your code would (provided changing 'test1' to
    "test1") only do switch on
    addresses to those strings, and that isn't what you want.

    To compare strings, use the standard strcmp() function, together with
    if-else-statements.

    Hope it helps.
    foo bar, Aug 28, 2003
    #2
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  3. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Cambrant Guest

    "foo bar" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:NHt3b.21555$...
    >
    > There are a few errors in your above code.
    >
    > First, string constants are enclosed with double-qoutes "test1".
    > Character constants are enclosed with single-qoutes 'c'.
    >
    > You can't test for strings in switch-statements. The case-expression must

    be
    > constant value.
    > Even though "test1" is a string constant, its value is the address to the
    > first character in the un-named
    > character array "test1". Your code would (provided changing 'test1' to
    > "test1") only do switch on
    > addresses to those strings, and that isn't what you want.
    >
    > To compare strings, use the standard strcmp() function, together with
    > if-else-statements.
    >
    > Hope it helps.
    >



    That helps a lot, thank you.

    Could I use a struct or something to keep track of all possible command line
    arguments, and then use the original switch-statement to check them? It just
    doesn't seem very "clean" to use a long if-else-statement. What do most
    people do?

    --
    Tim Cambrant
    <tim at cambrant dot com>
    Tim Cambrant, Aug 28, 2003
    #3
  4. "foo bar" <> wrote in
    news:NHt3b.21555$:

    >> int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    >> {
    >> switch(cmd_arg) {
    >> case 'test1':
    >> printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    >> return 0;
    >> case 'test2':
    >> printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    >> return 0;
    >> default:
    >> return 1;
    >> }
    >> }

    >
    > There are a few errors in your above code.
    >
    > First, string constants are enclosed with double-qoutes "test1".
    > Character constants are enclosed with single-qoutes 'c'.


    An aside. Weird as it looks I've seen people encode small words in 32-bit
    quantities using the single quotes. E.g. assume an int is 32-bits...

    void foo(int input)
    {
    switch (input)
    {
    case 'fish'
    printf("Input was fish\n");
    break;

    case 'Mark'
    printf("Input was Mark\n");
    break;

    default: printf("Bad input\n");
    }
    }

    --
    - Mark ->
    --
    Mark A. Odell, Aug 28, 2003
    #4
  5. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Hagan Guest

    Tim Cambrant wrote:
    >
    > Hi, I've been experimenting with C for about a week now and I've read the
    > tutorial at http://www.geocities.com/tom_torfs/cintro.html, so i feel quite
    > sure of the syntax and the program flow now. However, I don't seem to have
    > the right understanding of how arrays really work, since this test-program
    > of mine doesn't compile right.
    >
    > -------------
    >
    > #include <stdio.h>
    > #include <string.h>
    >
    > int parse_args(char cmd_arg[]);
    >
    > int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    > {
    > int i, arg_check;
    >
    > for (i=1; i < argc; i++) {
    > arg_check = parse_args(argv);
    >
    > if (arg_check == 1)
    > printf("Error: %s is an unknown command.", argv);


    Add \n to the end of the format string. Otherwise you may never see the
    message.

    > }
    >
    > return 0;
    > }
    >
    > int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    > {
    > switch(cmd_arg) {


    switch requires an integer argument. You're trying to give it a string.

    > case 'test1':


    'test' is not a string. It isn't even a character. And it certainly ain't an
    integer. (BTW "test" is the proper way to denote a string.)

    > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > return 0;
    > case 'test2':
    > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > return 0;
    > default:
    > return 1;
    > }
    > }


    A switch won't work in this case. :)

    You could try something like the following instead. (There are probably more
    efficient ways to do this.)

    int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    {
    if (strcmp(cmd_arg, "test1") == 0)
    {
    printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    return 0;
    }
    else if (strcmp(cmd_arg, "test2") == 0)
    {
    printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    return 0;
    }
    else
    return 1;
    }

    >
    > -------------
    >
    > When I try to compile this i get these errors:
    >
    > $ gcc -Wall test.c -o test
    > test.c: In function `parse_args':
    > test.c:22: switch quantity not an integer
    > test.c:23: character constant too long
    > test.c:26: character constant too long
    > test.c:24: warning: unreachable code at beginning of switch statement
    > $


    I think your compiler is trying to tell you something.

    You should also reduce the size of your indents from 8 characters (or tab) to
    something reasonable like 2 or 4.

    > I think it all depends on the fact that I don't know how to format the code
    > correctly when handling arrays (Where to use "array[]", "array[x]" or
    > "array"). I think I can recall having problems with the same thing a year
    > ago when giving C++ a go. What am I doing wrong?
    >
    > I think you'll understand the programs purpose, so I won't have to explain
    > it.


    --
    Tim Hagan
    Tim Hagan, Aug 28, 2003
    #5
  6. Tim Cambrant

    Ben Pfaff Guest

    "Mark A. Odell" <> writes:

    > An aside. Weird as it looks I've seen people encode small words in 32-bit
    > quantities using the single quotes. E.g. assume an int is 32-bits...


    The portability problem with that is that there's no standard way
    to map constants that contain more than one character into
    integers (C99 6.4.4.1):

    The value of an integer character constant containing more
    than one character (e.g., 'ab'), or containing a character
    or escape sequence that does not map to a single-byte
    execution character, is implementation-defined.
    --
    "IMO, Perl is an excellent language to break your teeth on"
    --Micah Cowan
    Ben Pfaff, Aug 28, 2003
    #6
  7. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Cambrant Guest

    "Tim Hagan" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:...
    > You could try something like the following instead. (There are probably

    more
    > efficient ways to do this.)
    >
    > int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    > {
    > if (strcmp(cmd_arg, "test1") == 0)
    > {
    > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > return 0;
    > }
    > else if (strcmp(cmd_arg, "test2") == 0)
    > {
    > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > return 0;
    > }
    > else
    > return 1;
    > }
    >

    Worked great, thank you.

    >
    > I think your compiler is trying to tell you something.
    >


    Obviously :)

    > You should also reduce the size of your indents from 8 characters (or tab)

    to
    > something reasonable like 2 or 4.
    >


    Well, to quote Linus Torvalds on that one...

    "Now, some people will claim that having 8-character indentations makes the
    code move too far to the right, and makes it hard to read on a 80-character
    terminal screen. The answer to that is that if you need more than 3 levels
    of indentation, you're screwed anyway, and should fix your program."

    I agree with him. I like 8-character tabs because it increses the
    readability for me. I suppose that if i ever share my sources to someone who
    can't read it, i'll just write a simple converter or something. :)
    Tim Cambrant, Aug 28, 2003
    #7
  8. Ben Pfaff <> wrote in
    news::

    >> An aside. Weird as it looks I've seen people encode small words in
    >> 32-bit quantities using the single quotes. E.g. assume an int is
    >> 32-bits...

    >
    > The portability problem with that is that there's no standard way
    > to map constants that contain more than one character into
    > integers (C99 6.4.4.1):
    >
    > The value of an integer character constant containing more
    > than one character (e.g., 'ab'), or containing a character
    > or escape sequence that does not map to a single-byte
    > execution character, is implementation-defined.


    Oh, I did not mean to encourage this oddity and I certainly did not mean
    to imply that it was portable, just that I've seen it.

    --
    - Mark ->
    --
    Mark A. Odell, Aug 28, 2003
    #8
  9. Tim Cambrant

    Randy Howard Guest

    In article <b8u3b.26083$>,
    says...
    > Could I use a struct or something to keep track of all possible command line
    > arguments, and then use the original switch-statement to check them?


    Not sure I follow what you mean by that.

    > It just doesn't seem very "clean" to use a long if-else-statement.


    Perhaps not, but that's C. If you prefer another language, you're
    in the wrong place. ;-)

    > What do most people do?


    Use one of those ugly if/else thingies. Seriously, you could do something
    like have a lookup table which maps arguments strings to integer values,
    then switch() on that. Doesn't seem worth the trouble though for
    something as basic as command line arguments.

    --
    Randy Howard _o
    2reply remove FOOBAR \<,
    ______________________()/ ()______________________________________________
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    Randy Howard, Aug 29, 2003
    #9
  10. Tim Cambrant

    Jirka Klaue Guest

    Tim Cambrant wrote:
    > "Tim Hagan" <> skrev i meddelandet

    ....
    >>You should also reduce the size of your indents from 8 characters (or tab)
    >>to something reasonable like 2 or 4.

    >
    > Well, to quote Linus Torvalds on that one...
    >
    > "Now, some people will claim that having 8-character indentations makes the
    > code move too far to the right, and makes it hard to read on a 80-character
    > terminal screen. The answer to that is that if you need more than 3 levels
    > of indentation, you're screwed anyway, and should fix your program."


    I'm curious, how Linus would implement the Floyd-Warshall algorithm.

    > I agree with him. I like 8-character tabs because it increses the
    > readability for me. I suppose that if i ever share my sources to someone who
    > can't read it, i'll just write a simple converter or something. :)


    Or something. GNU indent is free. :)

    Jirka
    Jirka Klaue, Aug 29, 2003
    #10
  11. Tim Cambrant

    Randy Howard Guest

    In article <mGu3b.26089$>,
    says...
    > I agree with him. I like 8-character tabs because it increses the
    > readability for me. I suppose that if i ever share my sources to someone who
    > can't read it, i'll just write a simple converter or something. :)


    Gnu indent does a fine job already, and it's not that simple to write
    one that does more than just modify indenting.

    --
    Randy Howard _o
    2reply remove FOOBAR \<,
    ______________________()/ ()______________________________________________
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    Randy Howard, Aug 29, 2003
    #11
  12. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Cambrant Guest

    "Randy Howard" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:...
    > In article <b8u3b.26083$>,
    > says...
    > > Could I use a struct or something to keep track of all possible command

    line
    > > arguments, and then use the original switch-statement to check them?

    >
    > Not sure I follow what you mean by that.


    Just ignore it. I was probably rambling on about something I know nothing
    about. :)

    > > It just doesn't seem very "clean" to use a long if-else-statement.

    >
    > Perhaps not, but that's C. If you prefer another language, you're
    > in the wrong place. ;-)
    >


    Well, I think I'll stick to C anyway :)

    > > What do most people do?

    >
    > Use one of those ugly if/else thingies. Seriously, you could do something
    > like have a lookup table which maps arguments strings to integer values,
    > then switch() on that. Doesn't seem worth the trouble though for
    > something as basic as command line arguments.
    >


    Nah, I don't feel like bothering. If/else will do fine. I come from a
    background of Ruby-scripting you see, and the mentality there is that there
    are always at least three ways to do one thing, and you should always use
    the best way. Just too bad you can't use Ruby to create executable programs,
    because it really is an OOP-masterpiece.

    Thank you anyway, I think you helped me understand the uglyness of C :)

    --
    Tim Cambrant
    <tim at cambrant dot com>
    Tim Cambrant, Aug 29, 2003
    #12
  13. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Cambrant Guest

    "Jirka Klaue" <-berlin.de> skrev i meddelandet
    news:bim3k9$t5f$-Berlin.DE...
    > I'm curious, how Linus would implement the Floyd-Warshall algorithm.
    >


    Haha, well, you'd have to ask him. Perhaps a somewhat cocky statement, but I
    usually work in a graphical environment with a high resolution, so I don't
    really care about line width. Perhaps I'll change one day when I see the
    benefits of 4-space tabs. I'll never do 2 tough. It just gets _messy_.

    > Or something. GNU indent is free. :)
    >


    Perhaps, thank you. I didn't know of that program until now.

    --
    Tim Cambrant
    <tim at cambrant dot com>
    Tim Cambrant, Aug 29, 2003
    #13
  14. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Cambrant Guest

    "Randy Howard" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:...
    > Gnu indent does a fine job already, and it's not that simple to write
    > one that does more than just modify indenting.
    >


    Havn't heard of that program before, but now I do :)

    If you wrote a program to modify indenting, why would you want it to do more
    than that? Of course, a program to correct indenting would be harder, but
    since I already indent my code correctly, I would only have to change the
    number of spaces to half. Isn't one of the basic ideas of Unix that you
    write a program to do one job, and to do that well?

    --
    Tim Cambrant
    <tim at cambrant dot com>
    Tim Cambrant, Aug 29, 2003
    #14
  15. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Cambrant Guest

    "Karl Heinz Buchegger" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:...
    >
    > In real code, things are often not that simple :)
    >


    What do I need to do, more than replacing every series of eight spaces in a
    file (or, every '\t') with four spaces? Of course that would mess up files
    with strings that contain eight spaces, but that could be avoided further.
    Of course it would be easier to use regular expressions, but since C doesn't
    support this in the standard libraries (or does it?), you would be stuck
    with comparing strings.

    Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    --
    Tim Cambrant
    <tim at cambrant dot com>
    Tim Cambrant, Aug 29, 2003
    #15
  16. Indenting (was re: Array-problems [newbie])

    On Fri, 29 Aug 2003, Tim Cambrant wrote:
    >
    > "Karl Heinz Buchegger" <> skrev...


    [re: indenting code automagically]

    > > In real code, things are often not that simple :)

    >
    > What do I need to do, more than replacing every series of eight spaces
    > in a file (or, every '\t') with four spaces? Of course that would mess
    > up files with strings that contain eight spaces, but that could be
    > avoided further. Of course it would be easier to use regular
    > expressions, but since C doesn't support this in the standard libraries
    > (or does it?), you would be stuck with comparing strings.
    >
    > Please correct me if I'm wrong.


    My coding style often looks like this:

    if (x) {
    if (y)
    z;
    w;
    }
    else
    aa;

    Even GNU indent seems to have problems with this style
    (four spaces inside braces, two spaces without braces).
    At least, *I* never figured out how to make it do what
    I wanted.
    The nice thing about 'indent' is that it will actually
    parse the code for you. It can handle blocks of code
    that look like this going in:

    if(x){if(y)z;w;}else aa;

    and print them out properly indented.
    What you're describing is probably what's commonly known
    as a 'detab'/'entab' utility. First, 'entab' your code
    using a tabstop of 8, and then 'detab' it with a tabstop
    of 4. That will shrink your indents appropriately.
    IME, most 'detab'/'entab' utilities have options to only
    affect whitespace at the beginnings of lines, so you don't
    have to worry about your string literals getting messed up.
    Clever tabbers might even recognize certain types of literals
    or comment text.

    And no, the C library doesn't support regexes. But
    they're overkill for tabbing. It's an ideal problem for
    the while ((c=getchar())!=EOF) ... loop that you've been
    hearing so much about. :)

    HTH,
    -Arthur
    Arthur J. O'Dwyer, Aug 29, 2003
    #16
  17. Tim Cambrant

    Randy Howard Guest

    In article <WEC3b.26114$>,
    says...
    > "Randy Howard" <> skrev i meddelandet
    > news:...
    > > Gnu indent does a fine job already, and it's not that simple to write
    > > one that does more than just modify indenting.
    > >

    >
    > Havn't heard of that program before, but now I do :)
    >
    > If you wrote a program to modify indenting, why would you want it to do more
    > than that?


    Because once you've written code smart enough to parse C source to look at
    indenting, you might as well handle a lot of other things, like brace
    style, blank lines before after various declarations, comment placement,
    you name it. A look at the man page for indent will demonstrate that the
    name is probably less than descriptive. "reformat" might be a better
    term.

    > Of course, a program to correct indenting would be harder, but
    > since I already indent my code correctly,


    Sadly, not everyone can agree on "correctly" in this context. The nice
    thing about a tool like indent is that you don't have to agree.

    > Isn't one of the basic ideas of Unix that you
    > write a program to do one job, and to do that well?


    In general, the toolbox approach is common, yes. In this case, I think
    you'll find that the degree of "one job" varies. Otherwise, why not
    just have 38 different versions of the 'ls' command, instead of a very
    long list of command line options?

    --
    Randy Howard _o
    2reply remove FOOBAR \<,
    ______________________()/ ()______________________________________________
    SCO Spam-magnet:
    Randy Howard, Aug 30, 2003
    #17
  18. Tim Cambrant

    Randy Howard Guest

    In article <WFZ3b.26238$>,
    says...
    > Of course, but for me, the newbie/beginner, I would be satisfied with a
    > simplistic space-replacer. Maybe a bit foolish, since it would be a good
    > place to start programming seriously,


    That's a very good point. I think this is probably as good a project as
    any to learn the vagaries of file I/O. It's certainly better than the
    typical homework problem, such as "Read this data file and calculate an
    electric bill from it"... bleh.

    > but where I am now, chances are big
    > that I'd just mess up my original program to a point beyond useability.


    Well, that's an easy problem to solve, just make backup copies. ;-)
    Odds are that any program you use to learn on will have bugs before
    you get it finished. That's the nature of learning to program. Despite
    what people might have you believe, no programmer just woke up one day,
    bought a computer, and then proceeded to write bug-free programmers
    without going through what used to be known as "the larval stage".

    --
    Randy Howard _o
    2reply remove FOOBAR \<,
    ______________________()/ ()______________________________________________
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    Randy Howard, Aug 30, 2003
    #18
  19. On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 21:20:09 UTC, Tim Hagan <>
    wrote:

    > Tim Cambrant wrote:
    > >
    > > Hi, I've been experimenting with C for about a week now and I've read the
    > > tutorial at http://www.geocities.com/tom_torfs/cintro.html, so i feel quite
    > > sure of the syntax and the program flow now. However, I don't seem to have
    > > the right understanding of how arrays really work, since this test-program
    > > of mine doesn't compile right.
    > >
    > > -------------
    > >
    > > #include <stdio.h>
    > > #include <string.h>
    > >
    > > int parse_args(char cmd_arg[]);
    > >
    > > int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    > > {
    > > int i, arg_check;
    > >
    > > for (i=1; i < argc; i++) {
    > > arg_check = parse_args(argv);
    > >
    > > if (arg_check == 1)
    > > printf("Error: %s is an unknown command.", argv);

    >
    > Add \n to the end of the format string. Otherwise you may never see the
    > message.
    >
    > > }
    > >
    > > return 0;
    > > }
    > >
    > > int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    > > {
    > > switch(cmd_arg) {

    >
    > switch requires an integer argument. You're trying to give it a string.
    >
    > > case 'test1':

    >
    > 'test' is not a string. It isn't even a character. And it certainly ain't an
    > integer. (BTW "test" is the proper way to denote a string.)
    >
    > > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > > return 0;
    > > case 'test2':
    > > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > > return 0;
    > > default:
    > > return 1;
    > > }
    > > }

    >
    > A switch won't work in this case. :)
    >
    > You could try something like the following instead. (There are probably more
    > efficient ways to do this.)
    >
    > int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    > {
    > if (strcmp(cmd_arg, "test1") == 0)
    > {
    > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > return 0;
    > }
    > else if (strcmp(cmd_arg, "test2") == 0)


    The else is superflous here as when the if is true the codeflow ends
    with the return statement. So only the case that if fails is over to
    handle.

    > {
    > printf("%s\n", cmd_arg);
    > return 0;
    > }
    > else


    Another superflous else

    > return 1;
    > }


    Do both, shortening the code and make it more flexible:

    /* list of commands:
    command to check in input, convert to token to have a value to
    switch
    when we have to handle each cmd differently */
    struct cmds {
    char *cmd; /* the cmd as pointer to string to use only memory as
    needed for a string*/
    int token; /* converted to int; should be a preprocessor token
    to be self documented */
    maybe more values assigned to that specific cmd, e.g. parameters, a
    fuction name
    that handles the cmd or something else needed to work with that
    CMD....
    } cmds = {
    { "test1", 1}, /* initialiser list */
    { "test2", 2},
    /* insert more cmd's when needed; no code change needed */
    { NULL, 0 } /* no more cmds known */
    };

    int parse_args(char cmd_arg[]);

    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
    int i, arg_check;

    for (i=1; i < argc; i++) {
    /* is argument a known cmd? */
    arg_check = parse_args(argv);
    if (arg_check == 0)
    /* no, it is */
    printf("Error: %s is an unknown command.",
    argv);
    }
    return 0;
    }

    /* check if given string is a cmd and return either
    - 0 if cmd is unknown or
    - int == cmd as token to have it easy to handle it after it is
    identified */
    int parse_args(char cmd_arg[])
    {
    struct cmds *pcmds = cmds;
    /* check against list of cmds */
    for (; *pcmds; pcmds++)
    if (!strcmp(cmds, cmdarg->cmd))
    return cmd->token; /* cmd found, return its token */
    return 0; /* cmd unknown, return error */
    }

    --
    Tschau/Bye
    Herbert

    eComStation 1.1 Deutsch Beta ist ver├╝gbar
    The Real OS/2 Guy, Aug 30, 2003
    #19
  20. Tim Cambrant

    Tim Cambrant Guest

    "Randy Howard" <> skrev i meddelandet
    news:...
    > Well, that's an easy problem to solve, just make backup copies. ;-)
    > Odds are that any program you use to learn on will have bugs before
    > you get it finished. That's the nature of learning to program. Despite
    > what people might have you believe, no programmer just woke up one day,
    > bought a computer, and then proceeded to write bug-free programmers
    > without going through what used to be known as "the larval stage".
    >


    That's of course true. I'm proud of being a novice, and I'm sure I'm less of
    a novice now than I was a year ago. (Yes, a year ago. I havn't exactly been
    devoted to programming as of yet.)

    I'm thinking about writing a c-code parser of some sort. At least I've been
    thinking about how to accomplish that for about a day now, and it seems
    possible to accomplish, as well as a good task.

    Thanks for you help and support :)

    --
    Tim Cambrant
    <tim at cambrant dot com>
    Tim Cambrant, Aug 30, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertising

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