Beginner questions...

Discussion in 'C++' started by Steve, Sep 19, 2005.

  1. Steve

    Steve Guest

    Hi,

    I am completely new to C++. I have good experience in Java, VB and some
    experience in C (as well as a few other languages). Bearing in mind my
    experience -

    - What would be the most suitable development environment for me to use for
    developing a Windows application?

    - If I am developing a Windows application I presume I am better using a GUI
    development environment as opposed to using just a text editor?

    - What book would be most suitable for me to read?

    - Do you have any recommended web resources for me to read?

    TIA.
     
    Steve, Sep 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Steve

    Steve Guest

    "Steve" <> wrote in message news:432edeb9$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am completely new to C++. I have good experience in Java, VB and some
    > experience in C (as well as a few other languages). Bearing in mind my
    > experience -
    >
    > - What would be the most suitable development environment for me to use
    > for developing a Windows application?
    >
    > - If I am developing a Windows application I presume I am better using a
    > GUI development environment as opposed to using just a text editor?
    >
    > - What book would be most suitable for me to read?
    >
    > - Do you have any recommended web resources for me to read?


    Also - should I consider using Visual C++.NET? What advantages would this
    offer over traditional C++ development? If I was provided a C++ API for
    another application, can I use this with C++.NET?
     
    Steve, Sep 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. Steve wrote:
    > I am completely new to C++. I have good experience in Java, VB and some
    > experience in C (as well as a few other languages). Bearing in mind my
    > experience -
    >
    > - What would be the most suitable development environment for me to use for
    > developing a Windows application?


    The one that you can afford (to buy and to learn). If your experience
    with VB is as good as you make it sound, staying with Microsoft may be
    a good choice.

    > - If I am developing a Windows application I presume I am better using a GUI
    > development environment as opposed to using just a text editor?


    Is that a question? I mean, why are you asking if you already presume?
    Are you asking whether your presumption is OK? I think it depends on your
    preferences.

    > - What book would be most suitable for me to read?


    There are many. There is no one book that is "the most suitable". Read
    more than one, only that way can you get to the bottom of it. If you need
    to learn C++ reasonably quickly, get "Accelerated C++". If you need to
    learn C++ as it relates to Windows programming, ask in a Windows NG.

    > - Do you have any recommended web resources for me to read?


    news:comp.os.ms-windows.programmer.win32 and microsoft.public.* hierarchy.
    The FAQ: http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite/.

    V
     
    Victor Bazarov, Sep 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Steve wrote:
    > [...]
    > Also - should I consider using Visual C++.NET?


    You definitely should. Consider, that is. It's one of the best compilers
    available on Windows. If you can wait, in October (AFAIUI) they are going
    to release the next version.

    > What advantages would this
    > offer over traditional C++ development?


    ".NET" is just a product designation. They have "traditional C++" as part
    of the package. Just like with any other product, they offer something
    "over" it, too. You can ask more about it in the designated newsgroup:
    'microsoft.public.vc.language'.

    > If I was provided a C++ API for
    > another application, can I use this with C++.NET?


    It depends. Often C++ API is specific to the compiler used to create that
    API, especially if it's in the binary form (libraries, object files).

    V
     
    Victor Bazarov, Sep 19, 2005
    #4
  5. Steve

    tmartsum Guest

    >Also - should I consider using Visual C++.NET? What advantages would this
    >offer over traditional C++ development? If I was provided a C++ API for
    >another application, can I use this with C++.NET?


    Maybe - depending on what programs you want to write. I would
    "normally" recommend QT (also makes your code crossplatform - it could
    be compiled on linux / mac ...).

    This can be used with Microsofts C++ compilers (with IDE) - but you can
    also just download the MS commandline compiler free. (However you will
    then not have an IDE)

    There is some costs in setting up QT up, but it is real smart once you
    get to know it.
    (So if you make real tiny programs then forget it - but if you building
    a big project then you should look at it)

    www.trolltech.com
     
    tmartsum, Sep 20, 2005
    #5
  6. Steve

    Gabriel Guest

    Steve wrote:
    > Hi,


    Please keep in mind that all my answers will be highly subjective.

    > I am completely new to C++. I have good experience in Java, VB and some
    > experience in C (as well as a few other languages). Bearing in mind my
    > experience -
    >
    > - What would be the most suitable development environment for me to use for
    > developing a Windows application?


    If it needs to be free, my first choice would be eclipse with the
    CDT-Plugin (C/C++ IDE) and the mingw compiler (You will need several
    packages from the mingw project: mingw, msys, gdb if I recall it
    correctly). Cygwin will give you a little more troubles.

    My second choice would be Bloodshed DevCpp.

    If you can afford to spend money, I can't answer the question. Might
    take a look at Comeau?

    > > Maybe Microsoft....


    Don't do it. Or if you do, use their environment, but not their
    compiler. The MIcrosoft compiler may be the compiler with the worst
    standard compliance, so you will get into troubles often.

    > - If I am developing a Windows application I presume I am better using a GUI
    > development environment as opposed to using just a text editor?


    definetly.

    You will need a library that takes care of building a GUI. Maybe QT
    (Trolltech)?

    > - What book would be most suitable for me to read?


    Bjarne Stroustrup: "The C++ programing language". A learning and
    reference book. A must have.

    At some level, you will want to read Scott Meyers: "Effective C++".
    Might be a bit tough to read at the beginning of your learning.

    Given some experience, Sutter&Alexandrescu: "C++ Coding Standards".
    Extremly usefull.

    > - Do you have any recommended web resources for me to read?


    Not right now.

    > TIA.
    >


    Another advice: forget everything you know about C. C++ is a very
    different beast. Do not structure C++ like you would structure C. C++
    has the same control structures and syntax elements but a very different
    philosophy.

    Gabriel
     
    Gabriel, Sep 20, 2005
    #6
  7. Steve

    benben Guest

    > This can be used with Microsofts C++ compilers (with IDE) - but you can
    > also just download the MS commandline compiler free. (However you will
    > then not have an IDE)


    Also, if you don't mind using beta software you can download the Visual C++
    2005 beta2 for free with an excellent IDE.

    ben
     
    benben, Sep 20, 2005
    #7
  8. Steve

    red floyd Guest

    Gabriel wrote:
    >
    > > > Maybe Microsoft....

    >
    > Don't do it. Or if you do, use their environment, but not their
    > compiler. The MIcrosoft compiler may be the compiler with the worst
    > standard compliance, so you will get into troubles often.
    >


    Gabriel,

    That's only VC6. VC7.1 is highly standards compliant.
     
    red floyd, Sep 20, 2005
    #8
  9. Steve

    Guest

    > If I am developing a Windows application I presume I am
    > better using a GUI development environment as opposed to
    > using just a text editor?


    For a non-GUI IDE with a bit more power than a text editor,
    take a look at Zeus:

    http://www.zeusedit.com/features.html

    Zeus has features like syntax highlighting, code folding,
    class browsing, intergrated version control, smart indenting,
    project/workspace management etc etc.

    > - Do you have any recommended web resources for me
    > to read?


    IMHO for anyone programming at the Win32 API level the
    Borland Win32 SDK Help File is a great source of
    information:

    http://www.zeusedit.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=7

    Jussi Jumppanen
    Author: Zeus for Windows
    Note: Zeus is shareware (45 day trial).
     
    , Sep 21, 2005
    #9
  10. <> schrieb:

    > IMHO for anyone programming at the Win32 API level the
    > Borland Win32 SDK Help File is a great source of
    > information


    .... which, by the way, is just a copy of MS's Win32-SDK-File. Which,
    by another way, is available online at ms.com for free (as in free
    beer).

    Markus
     
    Markus Becker, Sep 25, 2005
    #10
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