Coming from delphi - looking for an IDE - willing to spend money

Discussion in 'Python' started by Just call me James, Apr 25, 2006.

  1. Hi,

    Coming away from the luxury of the delphi IDE has been something of a
    shock.

    As a consequence I've become aware that maybe I need to spend some
    money on a python IDE.

    As a beginner I reckon integrated debugging would be helpful.

    Does anyone have any advice or suggestions? So far I've glanced at
    Komodo, but as a beginner I'm not in a positon to evaluate it.

    thanks for exprienced advice,

    Greg
     
    Just call me James, Apr 25, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Just call me James

    Dave Hughes Guest

    Just call me James wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Coming away from the luxury of the delphi IDE has been something of a
    > shock.
    >
    > As a consequence I've become aware that maybe I need to spend some
    > money on a python IDE.
    >
    > As a beginner I reckon integrated debugging would be helpful.
    >
    > Does anyone have any advice or suggestions? So far I've glanced at
    > Komodo, but as a beginner I'm not in a positon to evaluate it.
    >
    > thanks for exprienced advice,
    >
    > Greg


    I sympathize entirely (I've been a Delphi user since v2 and have yet to
    find an equally competent IDE for just about any language). Here's the
    list of IDEs I went through in my transition from Delphi to Python (I
    started off hacking around with Python on my Linux box with vim, but
    quickly went searching for something a bit more comprehensive and
    specific to the language):


    Boa Constructor
    http://boa-constructor.sourceforge.net/

    Heavy-weight IDE designed to be a sort of Delphi-for-Python. Includes
    integrated debugging, visual form designer and property inspector (uses
    wxWindows as its GUI framework) and a pretty cool editor (based on the
    Scintilla component).

    It's still a bit flaky in some places, but it's certainly usable. That
    said, my machine isn't exactly fast: I eventually got fed up with the
    slow speed and went hunting for something a bit quicker...


    Stani's Python Editor (SPE)
    http://pythonide.stani.be/

    Heavy-weight editor (based on Scintilla IIRC) with Blender integration.
    Uses wxGlade or XRCed as visual form designers. Didn't try this one for
    long; for some reason the interface just didn't "feel" right. Then
    again, it's open-source and many swear by it so you may as well give it
    a shot.


    TruStudio
    http://www.xored.com/trustudio

    Heavy-weight IDE (based on Eclipse). Gave it a whirl but as you can
    imagine, if my machine was slow with Boa Constructor, the Java-based
    Eclipse was just glacial... Urgh.


    PyScripter
    http://mmm-experts.com/Products.aspx?ProductId=4

    Light-weight IDE with integrated debugging (no visual form designer). I
    was interested in this as it's written in Delphi. Hence, it's pretty
    damned fast, small, and serves as an interesting example of integrating
    the Python interpreter in Delphi applications (something I was
    interested in doing, though I haven't had an actual need to do so yet).

    Unfortunately, the editor component used is SynEdit (which, being a
    Delphi user I'm guessing you've probably heard of and/or used).
    SynEdit's a great component for small scale editing, but it's just got
    too many bugs when dealing with large files or long editing sessions,
    and lacks some of Scintilla's neat features like code-folding (given
    that the source for PyScripter is available it might be interesting to
    try replacing the SynEdit editor with Scintilla since there's a Delphi
    interface for Scintilla available ... although I suspect it'd be a
    pretty big job).


    Notepad2
    http://www.flos-freeware.ch/notepad2.html

    Light-weight editor (based on Scintilla). Little more than a notepad
    replacement (no integrated debugger or visual stuff) with those
    features you always wanted in notepad (support for UNIX line breaks,
    syntax highlighting, etc).


    At this point I realized I'd gone from heavy-weight full-blown IDEs
    with integrated debugging, to heavy-weight editors, to light-weight
    editors, and back to using stack traces and the odd print statement for
    debugging. However, I also found (to my surprise) that I'd got
    comfortable enough with Python that not having integrated debugging no
    longer bothered me. I realized what I was really searching for was a
    small, fast, powerful editor...

    And so it was that after 2 or 3 weeks of hunting for the best IDE for
    me, I wound up right back where I started: vim :)

    Still, I consider the journey to have been worth it (e.g. the
    integrated debugger in Boa helped me learn Python that much quicker by
    making it easy to spot my beginners mistakes).

    You might want to check out eric3 as well. I haven't tried it but it's
    another one some people swear by:
    http://www.die-offenbachs.de/detlev/eric3.html


    Good luck!

    Dave.
    --
     
    Dave Hughes, Apr 25, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. I suggest checking out PythonCard.
    It's a GUI builder based on wxPython and it's very easy to use.
    It offers the basic functionality of Delphi or VB, letting you drag &
    drop widgets on a form.
    This visual way of dealing with widgets authomatically creates a file
    with the form and its controls description, and the events associated
    to these widgets are writen in another separated file as simple
    functions.

    http://pythoncard.sourceforge.net/
     
    =?iso-8859-1?q?Luis_M._Gonz=E1lez?=, Apr 25, 2006
    #3
  4. Just call me James

    gene tani Guest

    Just call me James wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Coming away from the luxury of the delphi IDE has been something of a
    > shock.
    >
    > As a consequence I've become aware that maybe I need to spend some
    > money on a python IDE.


    You can google for lots of IDE reviews, here's a start

    http://www.awaretek.com/tutorials.html#ide
    http://spyced.blogspot.com/2006/02/pycon-python-ide-review.html
    http://www.straw-dogs.co.uk/blog/python-ide-review

    http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Mail/Message/2732522
    http://www.artima.com/forums/flat.jsp?forum=106&thread=148389&start=0&msRange=15
     
    gene tani, Apr 25, 2006
    #4
  5. Just call me James

    RunLevelZero Guest

    Check out SciTE. It is from the creator of Scintilla and it's great.
    It's not a full IDE but with python you'll learn you really don't need
    it, at least IMHO. It's fast and works on windows and Linux.
    http://www.scintilla.org/SciTE.html

    I would also checkout WingIDE. Its one of the best, again IMHO. If
    you write open source apps you can have the IDE for free although they
    do ask to take a look at your source code and that you have a web page
    up for it. I believe those are the only requirements. If you don't
    have your project to that stage yet, they will give you a 6 month
    license to get it there.
    http://wingware.com

    Wing IDE Professional v. 2.x $179.00 $295.00 $395.00
    Wing IDE Personal v. 2.x $35.00 $60.00 $80.00
     
    RunLevelZero, Apr 25, 2006
    #5
  6. Just call me James

    Petr Jakes Guest

    Petr Jakes, Apr 26, 2006
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Lisa D. Toshiba

    Dont spend more on software, Python.

    Lisa D. Toshiba, May 7, 2004, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    263
    Lisa D. Toshiba
    May 7, 2004
  2. Replies:
    5
    Views:
    971
    Axel Straschil
    Apr 6, 2005
  3. Steve Holden

    PyCon is Coming! PyCon is Coming!

    Steve Holden, Jan 5, 2006, in forum: Python
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    337
    Steve Holden
    Jan 5, 2006
  4. Nathan McSween
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    282
  5. LCC
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    630
    iC and iC++
    Dec 23, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page