Comments on 3 Templates please.

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Andrew, Sep 15, 2006.

  1. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    Hi,

    I am working on 3 'bare-bones' CSS templates. Can I have some
    thoughts on the very beginnings of this work?

    All flexible layouts with no browser hacks and a bare minimum CSS:
    they are designed to be built onto rather than be a total solution in
    themselves.

    http://www.andrews-corner.org/2_column_header_footer.html
    http://www.andrews-corner.org/3_column_header_footer.html
    http://www.andrews-corner.org/1_column_flexible.html

    Thanks very much for any input,

    Andrew
    --

    Andrew
    http://www.andrews-corner.org/
    Andrew, Sep 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. Andrew

    Dylan Parry Guest

    Andrew wrote:

    > I am working on 3 'bare-bones' CSS templates. Can I have some
    > thoughts on the very beginnings of this work?


    It depends really on what content you have to put into the templates. I
    am presuming that you're going to use one of these templates for your
    own site? Anyway, I am basing this response on that (dangerous) assumption.

    > http://www.andrews-corner.org/2_column_header_footer.html


    This is a layout that people are comfortable with. It's an easy-to-use
    format, and the navigation is clearly set apart from the content. I
    would personally say this is best suited to you site.

    > http://www.andrews-corner.org/3_column_header_footer.html


    It's a familiar layout, like the above, but it really depends on whether
    you have content that warrants having the third column. I don't
    personally think that your site does, so I would probably not go down
    this route.

    > http://www.andrews-corner.org/1_column_flexible.html


    Boring ;) It's too much like a 1996-everything-is-centred layout for my
    liking, and doesn't look like it's taken anything in terms of thought or
    design skills to put it together. You could probably make it look very
    good if you spent a long time putting things together in Photoshop to
    spruce it up a bit, but it lacks the pre-built design elements that
    you'd get from using a column layout of some sort.

    Yes I realise that your current design is based on this theme, but
    evidentially you are looking for a change - so I suggest you make the
    most of it and go for something more interesting.

    --
    Dylan Parry
    http://electricfreedom.org | http://webpageworkshop.co.uk

    Programming, n: A pastime similar to banging one's head
    against a wall, but with fewer opportunities for reward.
    Dylan Parry, Sep 15, 2006
    #2
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  3. Andrew

    Andrew Guest

    On Fri, 15 Sep 2006 09:19:32 +0100, Dylan Parry
    <> wrote:

    >Andrew wrote:
    >
    >> I am working on 3 'bare-bones' CSS templates. Can I have some
    >> thoughts on the very beginnings of this work?

    >
    >It depends really on what content you have to put into the templates. I
    >am presuming that you're going to use one of these templates for your
    >own site? Anyway, I am basing this response on that (dangerous) assumption.
    >
    >> http://www.andrews-corner.org/2_column_header_footer.html

    >
    >This is a layout that people are comfortable with. It's an easy-to-use
    >format, and the navigation is clearly set apart from the content. I
    >would personally say this is best suited to you site.
    >
    >> http://www.andrews-corner.org/3_column_header_footer.html

    >
    >It's a familiar layout, like the above, but it really depends on whether
    >you have content that warrants having the third column. I don't
    >personally think that your site does, so I would probably not go down
    >this route.
    >
    >> http://www.andrews-corner.org/1_column_flexible.html

    >
    >Boring ;) It's too much like a 1996-everything-is-centred layout for my
    >liking, and doesn't look like it's taken anything in terms of thought or
    >design skills to put it together. You could probably make it look very
    >good if you spent a long time putting things together in Photoshop to
    >spruce it up a bit, but it lacks the pre-built design elements that
    >you'd get from using a column layout of some sort.
    >
    >Yes I realise that your current design is based on this theme, but
    >evidentially you are looking for a change - so I suggest you make the
    >most of it and go for something more interesting.


    Hi Dylan,

    Thanks for your thoughts on the 3 pages. In fact I will eventually
    migrate my own small site to one of these templates. My plan was to
    slowly work up all three over 6 months or so and then change.

    You are quite right about the single-column template that is drawn
    from my current site. It was directly inspired by several existing
    sites and it bothers me more than a little that there is so little of
    my own thought & design in it.

    Thanks again for your time & trouble,

    Andrew
    --

    Andrew
    http://www.andrews-corner.org/
    Andrew, Sep 15, 2006
    #3
  4. Andrew

    David Segall Guest

    Andrew <sorry.no.email@post_NG.com> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    > I am working on 3 'bare-bones' CSS templates. Can I have some
    >thoughts on the very beginnings of this work?
    >
    > All flexible layouts with no browser hacks and a bare minimum CSS:
    >they are designed to be built onto rather than be a total solution in
    >themselves.
    >
    >http://www.andrews-corner.org/2_column_header_footer.html
    >http://www.andrews-corner.org/3_column_header_footer.html
    >http://www.andrews-corner.org/1_column_flexible.html
    >
    > Thanks very much for any input,
    >
    > Andrew

    They are what I would call workmanlike. If you want to create the
    impression of a capable, knowledgeable, but boring web author they are
    fine.

    Contrast Jukka Korpela's http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html and
    Roedy Green’s http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html. They both cover
    the technical content well and they are both "good" web sites but they
    are world's apart in the interest they create and what they reveal
    about the authors.

    I decided that I did not have the visual talents required to create an
    attractive web site so I chose one from OSWD <http://www.oswd.org/>.
    Their advanced search allows you to restrict the results to specified
    [X]HTML and/or CSS standards. If you are redesigning your site it is
    well worth a visit if only to gauge what _you_ regard as visually
    attractive.
    David Segall, Sep 15, 2006
    #4
  5. Andrew

    mbstevens Guest

    On Fri, 15 Sep 2006 14:29:40 +0000, David Segall wrote:

    > Contrast Jukka Korpela's http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html and Roedy
    > Green’s http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html. They both cover the
    > technical content well and they are both "good" web sites


    Not the second one, by any stretch of my imagination.
    And look here:
    http://tinyurl.com/ncu6w

    > but they are
    > world's apart in the interest they create and what they reveal about the
    > authors.


    The content of Jukka's site is what creates interest. The good design
    just allows it to be accessed easily. I don't think you're taking into
    account what that particular site is _for_. No, it could not be used to
    sell Nike running shoes. Yes, it could teach you some very interesting
    things about your craft.
    mbstevens, Sep 15, 2006
    #5
  6. Andrew

    David Segall Guest

    mbstevens <> wrote:

    >On Fri, 15 Sep 2006 14:29:40 +0000, David Segall wrote:
    >
    >> Contrast Jukka Korpela's http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html and Roedy
    >> Green’s http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html. They both cover the
    >> technical content well and they are both "good" web sites

    >
    >Not the second one, by any stretch of my imagination.
    >And look here:
    >http://tinyurl.com/ncu6w
    >
    >> but they are
    >> world's apart in the interest they create and what they reveal about the
    >> authors.

    >
    >The content of Jukka's site is what creates interest. The good design
    >just allows it to be accessed easily. I don't think you're taking into
    >account what that particular site is _for_. No, it could not be used to
    >sell Nike running shoes. Yes, it could teach you some very interesting
    >things about your craft.

    That is exactly the point I was trying to make. I am not surprised
    that Roedy's site fails to verify because his eclectic style indicates
    that "following the rules" is not his first concern. I have learned
    interesting things about my craft from both those sites and I believe
    that the technical content of Roedy's site is just as valuable as
    Jukka's. I chose the two sites to contrast style, not substance.

    I agree that, in one sense, I did not take into account what the OP's
    site is for. I assumed that it was about some technical aspects of web
    site design. My post was intended to encourage the OP to reveal a
    little more of himself even if that was only reflected in his web site
    design rather than his web site content.

    To paraphrase your post: "I don't think you're taking into account
    who that particular site is _from_".
    David Segall, Sep 15, 2006
    #6
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