Compiler

Discussion in 'C++' started by David, May 21, 2004.

  1. David

    David Guest

    What's a good compiler that will take me through the learning process and
    function well enough for some time after I have learned the basics of C++?
    I am considering a good Borland product, but which one?
     
    David, May 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. David

    Rolf Magnus Guest

    David wrote:

    > What's a good compiler that will take me through the learning process
    > and function well enough for some time after I have learned the basics
    > of C++?


    That depends on the operating system you want to use for compilation and
    the system where your target programm will run. However, GNU g++ is
    available for a wide range of build and target platforms, so that could
    be a good start. Newer versions are quite good wrt standard compliance.
     
    Rolf Magnus, May 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. David

    David Guest

    Yes, I'm familiar with g++; but I am a sucker when it comes to packaging and
    compilers. I like the bells and whistles.
    I am using MS Windows on an Intel platform and that is my intended audience
    right now, although I would like to port some code if it is good enough.

    "Rolf Magnus" <> wrote in message
    news:c8kknj$a66$02$-online.com...
    > David wrote:
    >
    > > What's a good compiler that will take me through the learning process
    > > and function well enough for some time after I have learned the basics
    > > of C++?

    >
    > That depends on the operating system you want to use for compilation and
    > the system where your target programm will run. However, GNU g++ is
    > available for a wide range of build and target platforms, so that could
    > be a good start. Newer versions are quite good wrt standard compliance.
    >
     
    David, May 21, 2004
    #3
  4. David,

    I learned C++ though VC++, it takes away a lot of the chores of
    writing makefiles, etc., you can concentrate on the language side of
    things. I've tried the Borland products, it might be I'm too VC++ centric,
    but I found their interface a bit fiddly, like you have different keys for
    each
    short cut. Sorry, my fingers are hardwired right now... Also, VC++'s
    debugger
    is really cool. Oh that was VC++6, the 2003 .nET is entirely bollocks and
    so is
    the product too. Oh that language may not be the lingua pura and theres a
    lot of bugs
    and limitations, but you can get on quickly to learn the language.


    Still, a GUI style approach will save you a lot of time, just punch in some
    code
    from the text book/web whatever, and get it to run. A lot better than in
    the old days
    with Cfront et al.

    dave

    "David" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > What's a good compiler that will take me through the learning process and
    > function well enough for some time after I have learned the basics of C++?
    > I am considering a good Borland product, but which one?
    >
    >
     
    Dave Townsend, May 21, 2004
    #4
  5. David

    Petec Guest

    Dave Townsend wrote:
    > David,
    >
    > I learned C++ though VC++, it takes away a lot of the chores of
    > writing makefiles, etc., you can concentrate on the language side of
    > things. I've tried the Borland products, it might be I'm too VC++
    > centric, but I found their interface a bit fiddly, like you have
    > different keys for each
    > short cut. Sorry, my fingers are hardwired right now... Also, VC++'s
    > debugger
    > is really cool. Oh that was VC++6, the 2003 .nET is entirely
    > bollocks and so is
    > the product too. Oh that language may not be the lingua pura and
    > theres a lot of bugs
    > and limitations, but you can get on quickly to learn the language.
    >


    VC++ 2003 supports .Net, but does not in any way require you to use it. Its
    standard C++ support is almost perfect, and much better than 6. It compiles
    to excellently optimized native code. The debugger is also much better than
    6.

    - Pete

    >
    > Still, a GUI style approach will save you a lot of time, just punch
    > in some code
    > from the text book/web whatever, and get it to run. A lot better
    > than in the old days
    > with Cfront et al.
    >
    > dave
    >
    > "David" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> What's a good compiler that will take me through the learning
    >> process and function well enough for some time after I have learned
    >> the basics of C++? I am considering a good Borland product, but
    >> which one?
     
    Petec, May 21, 2004
    #5
  6. David

    Petec Guest

    David wrote:
    > What's a good compiler that will take me through the learning process
    > and function well enough for some time after I have learned the
    > basics of C++? I am considering a good Borland product, but which one?


    For starters, I would suggest Microsoft Visual C++ 2003 for an IDE, using
    this newer version of the compiler (free download):
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/

    If you want, the free compiler is also the best stand-alone command-line
    compiler, comes with an implementation of the standard library, and you can
    write Windows programs with it also.

    - Pete
     
    Petec, May 21, 2004
    #6
  7. David

    Petec Guest

    Petec wrote:
    > David wrote:
    >> What's a good compiler that will take me through the learning process
    >> and function well enough for some time after I have learned the
    >> basics of C++? I am considering a good Borland product, but which
    >> one?

    >
    > For starters, I would suggest Microsoft Visual C++ 2003 for an IDE,
    > using this newer version of the compiler (free download):
    > http://msdn.microsoft.com/visualc/vctoolkit2003/


    I forgot to mention, just get the Standard edition, NOT the Pro or
    Enterprise. The free compiler I linked to contains the important
    Professional features (the better compiler).
    FYI, VC++ 2003 Standard is ~$90.

    - Pete

    >
    > If you want, the free compiler is also the best stand-alone
    > command-line compiler, comes with an implementation of the standard
    > library, and you can write Windows programs with it also.
    >
    > - Pete
     
    Petec, May 21, 2004
    #7
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