Convert binary string to something meaningful??

Discussion in 'Python' started by supercooper, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. supercooper

    supercooper Guest

    I have this string that is being returned from a query on a DBISAM
    database. The field must be some sort of blob, and when I connect to
    the database thru ODBC in MS Access, the field type comes thru as OLE
    Object, and Access cannot read the field (it usually crashes Access).
    I can sorta pick out the data that I need (7.0, 28, 5TH PRINCIPAL MRD,
    10.0 - and these occur in roughly the same place in every record
    returned from the db), but I am wondering if there is a way to convert
    this. I looked at the struct module, but I really dont know the format
    of the data for sure. For starters, could someone tell me what '\x00'
    more than likely is? Any hints on modules to look at or esp code
    snippets would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    \x9c
    \x01\x00\x007.0\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00
    28.0\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00
    10.0\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\
    x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00WN
    \x00\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x10\xa3@
    \x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x10\x7f@NE NW SE
    \x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00CONGRESS
    QTR\x00\x00\x00\x005\x00\x005TH PRINCIPAL MRD
    \x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x0
    0\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x0
    0\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x0
    0\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00
     
    supercooper, Jun 13, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 2007-06-13, supercooper <> wrote:
    > I have this string that is being returned from a query on a DBISAM
    > database. The field must be some sort of blob, and when I connect to
    > the database thru ODBC in MS Access, the field type comes thru as OLE
    > Object, and Access cannot read the field (it usually crashes Access).
    > I can sorta pick out the data that I need (7.0, 28, 5TH PRINCIPAL MRD,
    > 10.0 - and these occur in roughly the same place in every record
    > returned from the db), but I am wondering if there is a way to convert
    > this. I looked at the struct module, but I really dont know the format
    > of the data for sure. For starters, could someone tell me what '\x00'
    > more than likely is?


    It's a byte where all 8 bits are zeros. Your data probably has
    fixed field widths, and unused bytes are just zero-filled.

    --
    Grant Edwards grante Yow! How's the wife?
    at Is she at home enjoying
    visi.com capitalism?
     
    Grant Edwards, Jun 13, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. walala
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,253
    Mike Treseler
    Aug 11, 2003
  2. Joshua Ellul
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    342
    Joshua Ellul
    Feb 15, 2004
  3. Khalid Sheikh
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    421
    Dennis Lee Bieber
    Jul 19, 2003
  4. Replies:
    3
    Views:
    315
    Thad Smith
    Feb 29, 2008
  5. Ara.T.Howard

    [RCR] meaningful RUBY_VERSION#<=>

    Ara.T.Howard, Feb 2, 2006, in forum: Ruby
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    99
    George Ogata
    Feb 3, 2006
Loading...

Share This Page