Getting Discouraged -- Insights Please

Discussion in 'Java' started by Noble, May 13, 2007.

  1. Noble

    Noble Guest

    I have several hundred dollars in Java books and not to mention
    several hours of time invested in learning the language.

    I see allot of messages and text on the Internet about people not
    wanting to use Java to write programs and that they do not like Java.

    All I want to do is use Java to create crossplatform shareware desktop
    applications. Am I wasting my time here?

    Thanks in advance,
    Noble
     
    Noble, May 13, 2007
    #1
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  2. Noble wrote:
    > I have several hundred dollars in Java books and not to mention
    > several hours of time invested in learning the language.
    >
    > I see allot of messages and text on the Internet about people not
    > wanting to use Java to write programs and that they do not like Java.
    >
    > All I want to do is use Java to create crossplatform shareware desktop
    > applications. Am I wasting my time here?


    If you look at any job site, then you will see that Java
    knowledge is highly in demand, so Java skills are not
    wasted.

    Whether your shareware desktop app will be a success or
    not I do not know. I don't think shareware is popular these
    days, but if the app is worth the money, then people will
    buy it.

    Arne
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, May 13, 2007
    #2
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  3. "Noble" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have several hundred dollars in Java books and not to mention
    > several hours of time invested in learning the language.
    >
    > I see allot of messages and text on the Internet about people not
    > wanting to use Java to write programs and that they do not like Java.
    >
    > All I want to do is use Java to create crossplatform shareware desktop
    > applications. Am I wasting my time here?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Noble
    >


    The vast majority of people who download software that they search for on
    the internet don't know and don't care what language it is written in. On
    the flip side, the majority of the same crowd are windows users ;)

    There is a group of anti Java zealots passing on and complaing about
    antiquated information. It is their right to carry on whatever warped
    beliefs that they want. The truth is, that Java performance is good enough
    for most any kind of application you could want. The overhead of
    downloading the JVM is comparable to a .NET platform.

    If you want to search for anti-microsoft, anti-mac, anti-java etc.
    propeganda you will find a lot of it. Popular platforms are going to be
    targetted the most. So many people use Java to program it is amazing!

    Good luck getting through the next "several hours" of study without getting
    discouraged further!

    --
    LTP

    :)
     
    Luc The Perverse, May 13, 2007
    #3
  4. "Noble" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have several hundred dollars in Java books and not to mention
    > several hours of time invested in learning the language.
    >
    > I see allot of messages and text on the Internet about people not
    > wanting to use Java to write programs and that they do not like Java.
    >


    That's mostly politics. Lots of developers use Java successfully.

    > All I want to do is use Java to create crossplatform shareware desktop
    > applications. Am I wasting my time here?


    It depends on what your applications are for. Java is good at many things,
    but it can't do everything. If other people are using Java to build similar
    apps, you should be fine. On the other hand, if you're trying to build
    (say) an application like "top" on Unix or the Task Manager on Windows,
    you'll have a difficult time in Java, because it's not good at making the
    sort of OS-specific calls needed to get the displayed information.

    In general, anyone who says either that Java sucks or that there's no reason
    to use any other language can be safely ignored.
     
    Mike Schilling, May 13, 2007
    #4
  5. Noble

    Eric Smith Guest

    Noble <> writes:
    > I see allot of messages and text on the Internet about people not
    > wanting to use Java to write programs and that they do not like Java.


    You can find people that gripe about anything.

    > All I want to do is use Java to create crossplatform shareware desktop
    > applications. Am I wasting my time here?


    No. Unless you have unusual requirements it's fine for that.
     
    Eric Smith, May 13, 2007
    #5
  6. Noble

    Jordi Guest

    Hi Noble,

    Don't hesitate and use Java, as it comes by default on most OS.
    I am developing my solution in Java.
    All that criticism about Java is from the past, when people feared
    security holes.

    Now Java is really safe and most people use it.

    You will always find technoidiots elsewhere.

    Jordi

    On 13 mayo, 05:32, Noble <> wrote:
    > I have several hundred dollars in Java books and not to mention
    > several hours of time invested in learning the language.
    >
    > I see allot of messages and text on the Internet about people not
    > wanting to use Java to write programs and that they do not like Java.
    >
    > All I want to do is use Java to create crossplatform shareware desktop
    > applications. Am I wasting my time here?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Noble
     
    Jordi, May 13, 2007
    #6
  7. Noble

    Noble Guest

    Thanks everyone for your candid responses. I will continue to study
    and see where that ends me up.

    Thanks again,
    nb
     
    Noble, May 13, 2007
    #7
  8. Noble wrote:
    > I have several hundred dollars in Java books and not to mention
    > several hours of time invested in learning the language.


    Believe me, you'll have to spend much, much more time to learn Java to
    be able to use it professionally. But for now you don't have to spend a
    lot of money on it. Books are fine, but you'll find that most of the
    knowledge needed for a beginner is already available on the Internet.
    There are tutorials and documentation on Sun's homepage. There is a good
    book for newbies written by Bruce Eckel (Thinking In Java) that is
    available for free.

    > I see allot of messages and text on the Internet about people not
    > wanting to use Java to write programs and that they do not like Java.


    And a lot hating Muslims or Christians or Windows or Linux users. Like
    with everything you'll find people that love Java and people that hate it.

    > All I want to do is use Java to create crossplatform shareware desktop
    > applications. Am I wasting my time here?


    No, you're not wasting time. Java is one of ways to create crossplatform
    desktop application.

    Regards,
    Leonard Milcin
     
    Leonard Milcin Jr., May 13, 2007
    #8
  9. Noble

    Noble Guest

    Thanks for the insight. I have heard about Bruce's work. But I have
    also heard that he is now mud because of his work with the new Adobe
    Flex stuff. I know you can't believe everything that you hear though.

    I was thinking about reading the "Head First Java" book. I have
    completed a book from John Smiley called "Learn to Program Java".

    Where can I find that free book from Bruce?

    nb
     
    Noble, May 13, 2007
    #9
  10. Andrew Thompson, May 13, 2007
    #10
  11. Noble

    Noble Guest

    Thanks. I will take a look at it.
    nb
     
    Noble, May 14, 2007
    #11
  12. Noble

    Guest

    On May 12, 10:32 pm, Noble <> wrote:

    > I see allot of messages and text on the Internet about people not
    > wanting to use Java to write programs and that they do not like Java.


    It's just FUD. FUD about Java is always with us. Different
    technologies come in and out of fashion and when something is new,
    people act like it is the greatest thing in the world and it will
    replace everything else. Java has a lot of strong points and Sun
    Microsystem's recent moves, IMO, are going to make sure JAVA is always
    with us as a language and a platform.

    As far as learning is concerned, everybody learns different. Myself, I
    prefer a book. But after your first intro book all you really need is
    the web for references.

    And once you learn Java, C/C++ and most other modern languages are a
    breeze to pick up.

    So good luck and ignore the FUD.
     
    , May 14, 2007
    #12
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