how can I clear a dictionary in python

Discussion in 'Python' started by Marko.Cain.23@gmail.com, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Hi,

    I create a dictionary like this
    myDict = {}

    and I add entry like this:
    myDict['a'] = 1
    but how can I empty the whole dictionary?

    Thank you.
     
    , Mar 28, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 29.03.2007, at 00:38, wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I create a dictionary like this
    > myDict = {}
    >
    > and I add entry like this:
    > myDict['a'] = 1
    > but how can I empty the whole dictionary?


    Reading the Python docs might help.
    But before, I would try a dir(myDict).
    Maybe you will find an easter-egg
    which has exactly the name you are looking for?

    cheers - chris
     
    Christian Tismer, Mar 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. Larry Bates Guest

    wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I create a dictionary like this
    > myDict = {}
    >
    > and I add entry like this:
    > myDict['a'] = 1
    > but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >
    > Thank you.
    >


    just point myDict to an empty dictionary again

    myDict={}

    Larry Bates
     
    Larry Bates, Mar 28, 2007
    #3
  4. Aahz Guest

    In article <>,
    Larry Bates <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    >>
    >> I create a dictionary like this
    >> myDict = {}
    >>
    >> and I add entry like this:
    >> myDict['a'] = 1
    >> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?

    >
    >just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >
    >myDict={}


    Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why his
    solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    Need a book? Use your library!
     
    Aahz, Mar 28, 2007
    #4
  5. On 29.03.2007, at 00:48, Larry Bates wrote:

    > wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I create a dictionary like this
    >> myDict = {}
    >>
    >> and I add entry like this:
    >> myDict['a'] = 1
    >> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >>

    >
    > just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >
    > myDict={}


    This is wrong and not answering the question.
    Creating a new dict does not change the dict.
    He wants to clear *this* dict, and maybe he
    cannot know how many other objects are
    referring to this dict.

    cheers -- chris


    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    """pointless questions or useless answers - what do you like more"""
     
    Christian Tismer, Mar 29, 2007
    #5
  6. a écrit :
    > Hi,
    >
    > I create a dictionary like this
    > myDict = {}
    >
    > and I add entry like this:
    > myDict['a'] = 1
    > but how can I empty the whole dictionary?


    >>> help(dict)

    Help on class dict in module __builtin__:

    class dict(object)
    (...)
    | Methods defined here:
    (...)
    |
    | clear(...)
    | D.clear() -> None. Remove all items from D.
    (...)
    >>>
    >>> d = dict(a=1, b=2)
    >>> d

    {'a': 1, 'b': 2}
    >>> d.clear()
    >>> d

    {}
    >>>
     
    Bruno Desthuilliers, Mar 29, 2007
    #6
  7. Aahz wrote:

    > Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning
    > why his solution is better than yours. Your explanation should
    > use id().


    I wonder how you two seem to know exactly what the OP wants ...

    Regards,


    Björn

    --
    BOFH excuse #335:

    the AA battery in the wallclock sends magnetic interference
     
    Bjoern Schliessmann, Mar 29, 2007
    #7
  8. Aahz Guest

    In article <>,
    Bjoern Schliessmann <> wrote:
    >Aahz wrote:
    >>
    >> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning
    >> why his solution is better than yours. Your explanation should
    >> use id().

    >
    >I wonder how you two seem to know exactly what the OP wants ...


    We don't. However, we do know exactly what the OP said... (Perhaps you
    didn't read the Subject: line?)
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    Need a book? Use your library!
     
    Aahz, Mar 29, 2007
    #8
  9. On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 01:51:07 +0200, Bjoern Schliessmann wrote:

    > Aahz wrote:
    >
    >> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning
    >> why his solution is better than yours. Your explanation should
    >> use id().

    >
    > I wonder how you two seem to know exactly what the OP wants ...


    By reading his post perhaps? He asked how to clear a dictionary, not how
    to assign an empty dictionary to a name. He already knows how to do that.

    (I know that from reading his post too.)


    --
    Steven.
     
    Steven D'Aprano, Mar 29, 2007
    #9
  10. Larry Bates Guest

    Aahz wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >> wrote:
    >>> I create a dictionary like this
    >>> myDict = {}
    >>>
    >>> and I add entry like this:
    >>> myDict['a'] = 1
    >>> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?

    >> just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >>
    >> myDict={}

    >
    > Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why his
    > solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().


    I believe he (as many new to Python do) are mired in old
    programming thinking that variables "contain" things.
    As I'm sure you kno, variables point to things in Python.
    I don't believe that there are lots of other objects
    pointing to this dictionary. Perhaps the OP can clarify
    for us. If there aren't other objects pointing to
    this dictionary it would make NO sense to iterate over a
    dictionary and delete all the keys/values so I tried to read
    between the lines and answer what I believe the OP thought he
    was asking. BTW-I didn't see you posting an answer to what
    you thought was the "correct" question, just criticizing me
    for taking the time to answer what I perceived the OP was
    asking.

    -Larry
     
    Larry Bates, Mar 29, 2007
    #10
  11. Larry Bates a écrit :
    > Aahz wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>> wrote:
    >>>> I create a dictionary like this
    >>>> myDict = {}
    >>>>
    >>>> and I add entry like this:
    >>>> myDict['a'] = 1
    >>>> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >>> just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >>>
    >>> myDict={}

    >> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why his
    >> solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().

    >
    > I believe he (as many new to Python do) are mired in old
    > programming thinking that variables "contain" things.


    Does "he" refer to Christian Tismer ? If so, you may want to use google
    and correct your beliefs (hint: does 'stackless Python' ring a bell ?).

    > As I'm sure you kno, variables point to things in Python.


    (conceptually) names are keys associated with an object in a given
    namespace. FWIW, be assured that Christians knows this pretty well.

    > I don't believe that there are lots of other objects
    > pointing to this dictionary.


    You just cannot *know* this. This might be true now, this might be false
    now, and this might change anytime. Assuming anything here is the road
    to disaster. Don't assume, do the righ thing.

    > Perhaps the OP can clarify
    > for us. If there aren't other objects pointing to
    > this dictionary it would make NO sense to iterate over a
    > dictionary and delete all the keys/values


    You don't iterate over anything. Dicts being the central datastructure
    in Python, you can bet your ass they are optimized to death (or near
    death). If you have any doubt, then still don't assume : verify (hint:
    import timeit). And yet even if clearing a dict happens to be a bit
    slower than instanciating a new one, rebinding a name and mutating an
    object are still two very different concepts in Python, with very
    different consequences. The OP explicitely asked for clearing a dict,
    not for creating a new one.

    > so I tried to read
    > between the lines


    Why ?

    > and answer what I believe the OP thought he
    > was asking.


    What the OP asked was quite clear, and not subject to any
    interpretation. And the correct answer is obviously not the one you gave.

    > BTW-I didn't see you posting an answer to what
    > you thought was the "correct" question, just criticizing me
    > for taking the time to answer what I perceived the OP was
    > asking.


    If you cannot understand the difference between criticism and a friendly
    correction, nor why you should actually thank the one correcting you
    when you're wrong, I guess there's no point trying explaining why
    correcting wrong answers on newsgroups is actually important.
     
    Bruno Desthuilliers, Mar 29, 2007
    #11
  12. Larry Bates Guest

    Bruno Desthuilliers wrote:
    > Larry Bates a écrit :
    >> Aahz wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>> I create a dictionary like this
    >>>>> myDict = {}
    >>>>>
    >>>>> and I add entry like this:
    >>>>> myDict['a'] = 1
    >>>>> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >>>> just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >>>>
    >>>> myDict={}
    >>> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why
    >>> his
    >>> solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().

    >>
    >> I believe he (as many new to Python do) are mired in old
    >> programming thinking that variables "contain" things.

    >
    > Does "he" refer to Christian Tismer ? If so, you may want to use google
    > and correct your beliefs (hint: does 'stackless Python' ring a bell ?).
    >
    >> As I'm sure you kno, variables point to things in Python.

    >
    > (conceptually) names are keys associated with an object in a given
    > namespace. FWIW, be assured that Christians knows this pretty well.
    >
    >> I don't believe that there are lots of other objects
    >> pointing to this dictionary.

    >
    > You just cannot *know* this. This might be true now, this might be false
    > now, and this might change anytime. Assuming anything here is the road
    > to disaster. Don't assume, do the righ thing.
    >
    >> Perhaps the OP can clarify
    >> for us. If there aren't other objects pointing to
    >> this dictionary it would make NO sense to iterate over a
    >> dictionary and delete all the keys/values

    >
    > You don't iterate over anything. Dicts being the central datastructure
    > in Python, you can bet your ass they are optimized to death (or near
    > death). If you have any doubt, then still don't assume : verify (hint:
    > import timeit). And yet even if clearing a dict happens to be a bit
    > slower than instanciating a new one, rebinding a name and mutating an
    > object are still two very different concepts in Python, with very
    > different consequences. The OP explicitely asked for clearing a dict,
    > not for creating a new one.
    >
    >> so I tried to read
    >> between the lines

    >
    > Why ?
    >
    >> and answer what I believe the OP thought he
    >> was asking.

    >
    > What the OP asked was quite clear, and not subject to any
    > interpretation. And the correct answer is obviously not the one you gave.
    >
    >> BTW-I didn't see you posting an answer to what
    >> you thought was the "correct" question, just criticizing me
    >> for taking the time to answer what I perceived the OP was
    >> asking.

    >
    > If you cannot understand the difference between criticism and a friendly
    > correction, nor why you should actually thank the one correcting you
    > when you're wrong, I guess there's no point trying explaining why
    > correcting wrong answers on newsgroups is actually important.


    I stand corrected about my answer, but I'll stick to my assumption
    (until told otherwise by the OP) that the question that was asked
    wasn't precisely what the OP wanted to accomplish. It was just too
    simple to mean what you guys assumed (e.g. complex dictionary pointed
    to by lots of other objects, etc.). I don't mind being corrected with
    the proper information, but Aahz's post doesn't make any sense. He said
    "Go back and read Christian's answer...". Christian's answers were not
    answers to the OP's question at all. Here is what shows up in my
    newsreader:

    '''
    Reading the Python docs might help.
    But before, I would try a dir(myDict).
    Maybe you will find an easter-egg
    which has exactly the name you are looking for?

    cheers - chris
    '''

    and

    '''
    This is wrong and not answering the question.
    Creating a new dict does not change the dict.
    He wants to clear *this* dict, and maybe he
    cannot know how many other objects are
    referring to this dict.

    cheers -- chris
    '''

    You appear to be the only one that apparently posted the correct
    answer myDict.clear() for which I thank you. I learned two things
    today: 1) answer EXACTLY the question that is asked and 2) dicts
    have a clear method that is safer than my answer.

    -Larry
     
    Larry Bates, Mar 29, 2007
    #12
  13. Russ Guest

    This little squabble got me thinking. I normally just use the
    myDict={} method of "clearing" a
    dictionary when I know there are no other references to it. However, I
    wonder how the
    efficiency of relying on the garbage collector to clear a dictionary
    compares with using the
    "clear" method. Does anyone know?
     
    Russ, Mar 30, 2007
    #13
  14. Russ <> wrote:

    > This little squabble got me thinking. I normally just use the
    > myDict={} method of "clearing" a
    > dictionary when I know there are no other references to it. However, I
    > wonder how the
    > efficiency of relying on the garbage collector to clear a dictionary
    > compares with using the
    > "clear" method. Does anyone know?


    Well, anybody who bothers to *MEASURE* can start building an idea.

    When the dict's already empty:

    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit 'd={}'
    10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.113 usec per loop
    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit 'd={}; d={}'
    1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.207 usec per loop
    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit 'd={}; d.clear()'
    1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.316 usec per loop

    Making one dict costs about 100 nanoseconds, making two of them costs
    about 200 (sensible), making one and clearing it 300 (so just the
    clearing, on an empty dict, about 200 nanoseconds).

    Unfortunately, microbenchmarks of operations which do change the state
    their timing depend on are trickier. Still, here's an attempt:

    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit -s'D=dict.fromkeys(xrange(99))'
    'd=D.copy()'
    100000 loops, best of 3: 6.73 usec per loop
    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit -s'D=dict.fromkeys(xrange(99))'
    'd=D.copy();d={}'
    100000 loops, best of 3: 6.76 usec per loop
    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit -s'D=dict.fromkeys(xrange(99))'
    'd=D.copy()'
    100000 loops, best of 3: 6.73 usec per loop
    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit -s'D=dict.fromkeys(xrange(99))'
    'd=D.copy();d={}'
    100000 loops, best of 3: 6.78 usec per loop
    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit -s'D=dict.fromkeys(xrange(99))'
    'd=D.copy();d.clear()'
    100000 loops, best of 3: 6.94 usec per loop
    brain:~ alex$ python -mtimeit -s'D=dict.fromkeys(xrange(99))'
    'd=D.copy();d.clear()'
    100000 loops, best of 3: 6.93 usec per loop

    Here, making a middly-size dict costs about 6730 nanoseconds.
    Making an empty one as well adds 30-50 nanoseconds; clearing the middly
    one instead ads 200 nanoseconds or so.

    It would appear that clearing an existing dict costs about twice as much
    (or more) as making a new one (200 nanoseconds vs 100 nanoseconds or
    less) for different sizes of the existing dict.

    This is on a 2GHz Intel Core Duo with Python 2.5 -- measures of a few
    tens of nanoseconds can be "noisy" enough to change substantially on
    different release of Python or different CPUs.

    Fortunately, it's unusual to care about such tiny performance issues
    (here, the time to build the dictionary would normally swap the time to
    clear it, OR to assign an empty one instead, by over an order of
    magnitude, so...).


    Alex
     
    Alex Martelli, Mar 30, 2007
    #14
  15. Aahz Guest

    In article <>,
    Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >Aahz wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> I create a dictionary like this
    >>>> myDict = {}
    >>>>
    >>>> and I add entry like this:
    >>>> myDict['a'] = 1
    >>>> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >>> just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >>>
    >>> myDict={}

    >>
    >> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why his
    >> solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().

    >
    >I believe he (as many new to Python do) are mired in old programming
    >thinking that variables "contain" things. As I'm sure you kno,
    >variables point to things in Python. I don't believe that there are
    >lots of other objects pointing to this dictionary. Perhaps the OP
    >can clarify for us. If there aren't other objects pointing to this
    >dictionary it would make NO sense to iterate over a dictionary and
    >delete all the keys/values so I tried to read between the lines and
    >answer what I believe the OP thought he was asking.


    Then you should explain why you didn't answer the question that was
    asked. Answering a different question without explanation makes your
    answer irrelevant at best, wrong at worst.

    >BTW-I didn't see you posting an answer to what you thought was the
    >"correct" question, just criticizing me for taking the time to answer
    >what I perceived the OP was asking.


    Because Christian already answered the question! Granted, he chose a
    pseudo-Socratic approach, but with the OP already using the word "clear"
    in the Subject: line, I think that was entirely reasonable.
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    Need a book? Use your library!
     
    Aahz, Apr 3, 2007
    #15
  16. On 2007-04-03, Aahz <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>Aahz wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I create a dictionary like this
    >>>>> myDict = {}
    >>>>>
    >>>>> and I add entry like this:
    >>>>> myDict['a'] = 1
    >>>>> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >>>> just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >>>>
    >>>> myDict={}
    >>>
    >>> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why his
    >>> solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().

    >>
    >>I believe he (as many new to Python do) are mired in old programming
    >>thinking that variables "contain" things. As I'm sure you kno,
    >>variables point to things in Python. I don't believe that there are
    >>lots of other objects pointing to this dictionary. Perhaps the OP
    >>can clarify for us. If there aren't other objects pointing to this
    >>dictionary it would make NO sense to iterate over a dictionary and
    >>delete all the keys/values so I tried to read between the lines and
    >>answer what I believe the OP thought he was asking.

    >
    > Then you should explain why you didn't answer the question that was
    > asked. Answering a different question without explanation makes your
    > answer irrelevant at best, wrong at worst.


    This is not true. If this different question was in fact the intended
    question instead of the one actually asked. Anwering this different
    question can be more usefull than answering the one actually asked.

    People are often enough not very exact in their communication and
    that goes double for people who are new in a particular subject.
    So I think it is entirely appropiate to think about the real question
    the person is strugling with that hides between the question
    actually asked.

    Yes sometimes those who try to guess the intentions of the OP
    are going totally off in the wrong direction. But I have also
    seen those people providing very helpfull information, while
    those that would stick to the "actual" question didn'y provide
    very usefull information.

    --
    Antoon Pardon
     
    Antoon Pardon, Apr 4, 2007
    #16
  17. Aahz Guest

    In article <>,
    Antoon Pardon <> wrote:
    >On 2007-04-03, Aahz <> wrote:
    >> In article <>,
    >> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>>Aahz wrote:
    >>>> In article <>,
    >>>> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I create a dictionary like this
    >>>>>> myDict = {}
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> and I add entry like this:
    >>>>>> myDict['a'] = 1
    >>>>>> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >>>>> just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >>>>>
    >>>>> myDict={}
    >>>>
    >>>> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why his
    >>>> solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().
    >>>
    >>>I believe he (as many new to Python do) are mired in old programming
    >>>thinking that variables "contain" things. As I'm sure you kno,
    >>>variables point to things in Python. I don't believe that there are
    >>>lots of other objects pointing to this dictionary. Perhaps the OP
    >>>can clarify for us. If there aren't other objects pointing to this
    >>>dictionary it would make NO sense to iterate over a dictionary and
    >>>delete all the keys/values so I tried to read between the lines and
    >>>answer what I believe the OP thought he was asking.

    >>
    >> Then you should explain why you didn't answer the question that was
    >> asked. Answering a different question without explanation makes your
    >> answer irrelevant at best, wrong at worst.

    >
    >This is not true. If this different question was in fact the intended
    >question instead of the one actually asked. Anwering this different
    >question can be more usefull than answering the one actually asked.


    Note carefully that I did not say, "Don't answer the question you think
    should have been asked." What I said was, "If you answer a different
    question, EXPLAIN WHY." Is that so difficult to understand?
    --
    Aahz () <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

    Why is this newsgroup different from all other newsgroups?
     
    Aahz, Apr 5, 2007
    #17
  18. Steven Howe Guest

    Tempest in a teapot guys.

    Aahz wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Antoon Pardon <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2007-04-03, Aahz <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Aahz wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> In article <>,
    >>>>> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I create a dictionary like this
    >>>>>>> myDict = {}
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> and I add entry like this:
    >>>>>>> myDict['a'] = 1
    >>>>>>> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> myDict={}
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why his
    >>>>> solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().
    >>>>>
    >>>> I believe he (as many new to Python do) are mired in old programming
    >>>> thinking that variables "contain" things. As I'm sure you kno,
    >>>> variables point to things in Python. I don't believe that there are
    >>>> lots of other objects pointing to this dictionary. Perhaps the OP
    >>>> can clarify for us. If there aren't other objects pointing to this
    >>>> dictionary it would make NO sense to iterate over a dictionary and
    >>>> delete all the keys/values so I tried to read between the lines and
    >>>> answer what I believe the OP thought he was asking.
    >>>>
    >>> Then you should explain why you didn't answer the question that was
    >>> asked. Answering a different question without explanation makes your
    >>> answer irrelevant at best, wrong at worst.
    >>>

    >> This is not true. If this different question was in fact the intended
    >> question instead of the one actually asked. Anwering this different
    >> question can be more usefull than answering the one actually asked.
    >>

    >
    > Note carefully that I did not say, "Don't answer the question you think
    > should have been asked." What I said was, "If you answer a different
    > question, EXPLAIN WHY." Is that so difficult to understand?
    >
     
    Steven Howe, Apr 5, 2007
    #18
  19. On 2007-04-04, Aahz <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Antoon Pardon <> wrote:
    >>On 2007-04-03, Aahz <> wrote:
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>>>Aahz wrote:
    >>>>> In article <>,
    >>>>> Larry Bates <> wrote:
    >>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> I create a dictionary like this
    >>>>>>> myDict = {}
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> and I add entry like this:
    >>>>>>> myDict['a'] = 1
    >>>>>>> but how can I empty the whole dictionary?
    >>>>>> just point myDict to an empty dictionary again
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> myDict={}
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Go back and read Christian's post, then post a followup explaning why his
    >>>>> solution is better than yours. Your explanation should use id().
    >>>>
    >>>>I believe he (as many new to Python do) are mired in old programming
    >>>>thinking that variables "contain" things. As I'm sure you kno,
    >>>>variables point to things in Python. I don't believe that there are
    >>>>lots of other objects pointing to this dictionary. Perhaps the OP
    >>>>can clarify for us. If there aren't other objects pointing to this
    >>>>dictionary it would make NO sense to iterate over a dictionary and
    >>>>delete all the keys/values so I tried to read between the lines and
    >>>>answer what I believe the OP thought he was asking.
    >>>
    >>> Then you should explain why you didn't answer the question that was
    >>> asked. Answering a different question without explanation makes your
    >>> answer irrelevant at best, wrong at worst.

    >>
    >>This is not true. If this different question was in fact the intended
    >>question instead of the one actually asked. Anwering this different
    >>question can be more usefull than answering the one actually asked.

    >
    > Note carefully that I did not say, "Don't answer the question you think
    > should have been asked." What I said was, "If you answer a different
    > question, EXPLAIN WHY." Is that so difficult to understand?


    You are mixing up two things:

    On the one hand you are trying to get some moral behaviour accrosss:
    People should explain when answering a different question.

    On the second hand you are bringing an opinion: If they don't their
    answer is irrelevant at best.

    If someone disagrees with the second, repeating the first seems
    a bit beside the point.

    --
    Antoon Pardon
     
    Antoon Pardon, Apr 10, 2007
    #19
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