How widely used are the JavaScript "import" and "export" statements?

Discussion in 'Javascript' started by David Karr, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. David Karr

    David Karr Guest

    I was reviewing an introductory JavaScript manuscript today, and I
    noticed a reference to the "import" and "export" statements, which I
    had never even noticed before. I see that they are not supported in
    IE, and not in ECMAScript, either. Has anyone ever used these
    statements for anything useful?
     
    David Karr, Aug 2, 2009
    #1
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  2. David Karr wrote:
    > I was reviewing an introductory JavaScript manuscript today, and I
    > noticed a reference to the "import" and "export" statements, which I
    > had never even noticed before. I see that they are not supported in
    > IE, and not in ECMAScript, either. Has anyone ever used these
    > statements for anything useful?


    There are no such statements.


    PointedEars
    --
    realism: HTML 4.01 Strict
    evangelism: XHTML 1.0 Strict
    madness: XHTML 1.1 as application/xhtml+xml
    -- Bjoern Hoehrmann
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Aug 2, 2009
    #2
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  3. David Karr

    David Karr Guest

    Re: How widely used are the JavaScript "import" and "export"statements?

    On Aug 2, 12:11 pm, Jonathan Fine <> wrote:
    > David Karr wrote:
    > > I was reviewing an introductory JavaScript manuscript today, and I
    > > noticed a reference to the "import" and "export" statements, which I
    > > had never even noticed before.  I see that they are not supported in
    > > IE, and not in ECMAScript, either.  Has anyone ever used these
    > > statements for anything useful?

    >
    > JavaScript has a large number of reserved words, most of which are
    > unused.  The words 'import' and 'export' are in this list.


    The following page in the Mozilla DevCenter documents it: <https://
    developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Statements/
    import>.

    I also found it mentioned here: <http://www.devguru.com/Technologies/
    Ecmascript/Quickref/import.html> . This page is odd, as it claims to
    document EMCA-262, but other pages say it's not in ECMAScript.
    Perhaps it was present at one time, and was removed?

    It's also mentioned here: <http://docs.sun.com/source/816-6408-10/
    stmt.htm>.
     
    David Karr, Aug 2, 2009
    #3
  4. Re: How widely used are the JavaScript "import" and "export" statements?

    David Karr wrote:
    > On Aug 2, 12:11 pm, Jonathan Fine <> wrote:
    >> David Karr wrote:
    >>> I was reviewing an introductory JavaScript manuscript today, and I
    >>> noticed a reference to the "import" and "export" statements, which I
    >>> had never even noticed before. I see that they are not supported in
    >>> IE, and not in ECMAScript, either. Has anyone ever used these
    >>> statements for anything useful?

    >> JavaScript has a large number of reserved words, most of which are
    >> unused. The words 'import' and 'export' are in this list.

    >
    > The following page in the Mozilla DevCenter documents it: <https://
    > developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Statements/
    > import>.


    Interesting; the Matrix has you. However, as you observe, the import/export
    feature is related to signed scripts only. That is probably the reason why
    they are so seldom used.

    > I also found it mentioned here: <http://www.devguru.com/Technologies/
    > Ecmascript/Quickref/import.html> . This page is odd, as it claims to
    > document EMCA-262, but other pages say it's not in ECMAScript.
    > Perhaps it was present at one time, and was removed?


    It has never been part of any edition of _ECMA_-262. One of many mistakes
    there (since when is \\ an operator?). Remove that bookmark.

    > It's also mentioned here: <http://docs.sun.com/source/816-6408-10/
    > stmt.htm>.


    ACK


    PointedEars
    --
    Anyone who slaps a 'this page is best viewed with Browser X' label on
    a Web page appears to be yearning for the bad old days, before the Web,
    when you had very little chance of reading a document written on another
    computer, another word processor, or another network. -- Tim Berners-Lee
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Aug 3, 2009
    #4
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