IE is frolocking with my #content

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Marc, Oct 24, 2003.

  1. Marc

    Marc Guest

    http://fuseyouthgroup.com

    In IE the #content div takes the width of it's contents as opposed to
    Mozilla and Opera, which, as desired, take the full width available. This
    is obvious by switching between the home page and the about page. Mozilla
    and Opera are fine - just IE being a pain as usual.

    I have separate stylesheets for IE, Opera, and Mozilla, so I can easily make
    CSS changes to have effect only when viewed in IE.

    Has anyone got any ideas? They would be much appreciated.

    Kind Regards,

    Marc
    Marc, Oct 24, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Marc

    Steve Pugh Guest

    "Marc" <> wrote:

    >http://fuseyouthgroup.com
    >
    >In IE the #content div takes the width of it's contents as opposed to
    >Mozilla and Opera, which, as desired, take the full width available. This
    >is obvious by switching between the home page and the about page. Mozilla
    >and Opera are fine - just IE being a pain as usual.
    >
    >I have separate stylesheets for IE, Opera, and Mozilla, so I can easily make
    >CSS changes to have effect only when viewed in IE.


    I can understand having a barebones stylesheet for NN4 and hiding
    everything else. I can even understand having a separate stylesheet
    for IE5 (or rather using a hack to hide some values from IE5). But
    IE6, Mozilla and Opera should all be capable of using the same
    stylesheet unless you're doing something very complex.

    >Has anyone got any ideas? They would be much appreciated.


    Why are you using absolute positioning?

    I'd float the various elements to get that layout.

    But it looks like IE is ignoring the right: 200px; style. If you want
    to stick with absolute positioning get rid of that and add something
    like:
    #content {width: 80%}
    #nav {width: 15%}

    Steve


    --
    "My theories appal you, my heresies outrage you,
    I never answer letters and you don't like my tie." - The Doctor

    Steve Pugh <> <http://steve.pugh.net/>
    Steve Pugh, Oct 24, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Marc

    Richard Guest

    Steve Pugh wrote:

    > "Marc" <> wrote:


    >>http://fuseyouthgroup.com


    >>In IE the #content div takes the width of it's contents as opposed to
    >>Mozilla and Opera, which, as desired, take the full width available.
    >>This
    >>is obvious by switching between the home page and the about page.
    >>Mozilla
    >>and Opera are fine - just IE being a pain as usual.


    I use IE 6 and saw no problems with it. The width of the broken red border
    area changed in accordance with browser size. Not the content of the cell.

    BTW, there is an ISP in cincinnati called "fuse.net" which is Cincinnati
    Bell. You may want to add a note saying you are not connected with that
    organization in any way.


    >>I have separate stylesheets for IE, Opera, and Mozilla, so I can easily
    >>make
    >>CSS changes to have effect only when viewed in IE.


    > I can understand having a barebones stylesheet for NN4 and hiding
    > everything else. I can even understand having a separate stylesheet
    > for IE5 (or rather using a hack to hide some values from IE5). But
    > IE6, Mozilla and Opera should all be capable of using the same
    > stylesheet unless you're doing something very complex.


    >>Has anyone got any ideas? They would be much appreciated.


    > Why are you using absolute positioning?


    Because it allows the division to be placed anywhere regardless of float.
    Float is fine when divisions are nested, and sometimes necessary.


    > I'd float the various elements to get that layout.


    > But it looks like IE is ignoring the right: 200px; style. If you want
    > to stick with absolute positioning get rid of that and add something
    > like:
    > #content {width: 80%}
    > #nav {width: 15%}


    Which is fine if you intend only on having one divison and not nest any.



    > Steve



    > --
    > "My theories appal you, my heresies outrage you,
    > I never answer letters and you don't like my tie." - The Doctor


    > Steve Pugh <> <http://steve.pugh.net/>
    Richard, Oct 24, 2003
    #3
  4. Richard wrote:
    >> "Marc" <> wrote:
    >>>http://fuseyouthgroup.com

    >
    > BTW, there is an ISP in cincinnati called "fuse.net" which is Cincinnati
    > Bell. You may want to add a note saying you are not connected with that
    > organization in any way.


    Why? If you're going to do that, you might as well add that you're not
    affiliated with:

    - Fuse, the chocolate bar
    - fuse, the short piece of wire
    - fuse, the process of joining two atomic nuclei

    Also, does this place in Cincinnati have a note saying they're not
    connected with Marc's site in any way? Or with the chocolate bar? wire?
    nuclear process?

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?id=132
    Toby A Inkster, Oct 24, 2003
    #4
  5. Marc

    Steve Pugh Guest

    "Richard" <anom@anom> wrote:
    > Steve Pugh wrote:
    > > "Marc" <> wrote:

    >
    >>>http://fuseyouthgroup.com

    >
    >>>In IE the #content div takes the width of it's contents as opposed to
    >>>Mozilla and Opera, which, as desired, take the full width available.
    >>>This is obvious by switching between the home page and the about page.
    >>>Mozilla and Opera are fine - just IE being a pain as usual.

    >
    >I use IE 6 and saw no problems with it. The width of the broken red border
    >area changed in accordance with browser size. Not the content of the cell.


    That would be because the stylesheet has been changed between the
    original post and now. It looks like the author has adopted my
    suggestion nof specifying a width.

    >> Why are you using absolute positioning?

    >
    >Because it allows the division to be placed anywhere regardless of float.


    But that's very rarely needed, and certainly isn't in this case.

    >Float is fine when divisions are nested, and sometimes necessary.


    Float is simpler and more flexible than positioning.

    >> I'd float the various elements to get that layout.

    >
    >> But it looks like IE is ignoring the right: 200px; style. If you want
    >> to stick with absolute positioning get rid of that and add something
    >> like:
    >> #content {width: 80%}
    >> #nav {width: 15%}

    >
    >Which is fine if you intend only on having one divison and not nest any.


    Please explain that. The design had two columns of content, so
    specifying percentage widths for those two columns is sensible. Adding
    further blocks above and/or below those divs or nesting blocks within
    them make makes no difference at all.

    Steve

    --
    "My theories appal you, my heresies outrage you,
    I never answer letters and you don't like my tie." - The Doctor

    Steve Pugh <> <http://steve.pugh.net/>
    Steve Pugh, Oct 24, 2003
    #5
  6. Marc

    Marc Guest

    > >>>http://fuseyouthgroup.com
    > >
    > >>>In IE the #content div takes the width of it's contents as opposed to
    > >>>Mozilla and Opera, which, as desired, take the full width available.
    > >>>This is obvious by switching between the home page and the about page.
    > >>>Mozilla and Opera are fine - just IE being a pain as usual.

    > >
    > >I use IE 6 and saw no problems with it. The width of the broken red

    border
    > >area changed in accordance with browser size. Not the content of the

    cell.
    >
    > That would be because the stylesheet has been changed between the
    > original post and now. It looks like the author has adopted my
    > suggestion nof specifying a width.


    Correct. I took on board your suggestion.

    > >> Why are you using absolute positioning?

    > >
    > >Because it allows the division to be placed anywhere regardless of float.

    >
    > But that's very rarely needed, and certainly isn't in this case.


    As it happens, it is - the stylesheet is to be used for other sites which
    may be more complex, thus I prefered to use absolute positioning enabling me
    to define everything more specifically. This is also why I have three
    seperate stylesheets for each browser (IE, Mozilla, and Opera), for
    compatibility with other sites which are more complex. This gives me a
    total of 12 stylesheets, as there is also a default stylesheet incase the
    browser cannot be identified.

    Thus, I would prefer to use absolute positioning as opposed to the % method
    you advised, although I have adopted this in the mean time, it is not ideal.

    Other suggestions would be welcome, but thanks for yours in any event.

    > >Float is fine when divisions are nested, and sometimes necessary.

    >
    > Float is simpler and more flexible than positioning.
    >
    > >> I'd float the various elements to get that layout.

    > >
    > >> But it looks like IE is ignoring the right: 200px; style. If you want
    > >> to stick with absolute positioning get rid of that and add something
    > >> like:
    > >> #content {width: 80%}
    > >> #nav {width: 15%}

    > >
    > >Which is fine if you intend only on having one divison and not nest any.

    >
    > Please explain that. The design had two columns of content, so
    > specifying percentage widths for those two columns is sensible. Adding
    > further blocks above and/or below those divs or nesting blocks within
    > them make makes no difference at all.


    Richard is correct, this is not ideal, but if the only use were for this
    site, it would not be a problem.

    Marc
    Marc, Oct 25, 2003
    #6
  7. Marc

    Marc Guest

    > >>>http://fuseyouthgroup.com
    > >
    > > BTW, there is an ISP in cincinnati called "fuse.net" which is Cincinnati
    > > Bell. You may want to add a note saying you are not connected with that
    > > organization in any way.

    >
    > Why? If you're going to do that, you might as well add that you're not
    > affiliated with:
    >
    > - Fuse, the chocolate bar
    > - fuse, the short piece of wire
    > - fuse, the process of joining two atomic nuclei
    >
    > Also, does this place in Cincinnati have a note saying they're not
    > connected with Marc's site in any way? Or with the chocolate bar? wire?
    > nuclear process?


    I don't think this is necessary as the main audience is young people
    locally, and the site really will only be accessed by members and
    prospective members. We did at one point, however, have the suggestion of
    changing the logo to a chocolate bar, from one of the young people!

    Marc
    Marc, Oct 25, 2003
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. J.Edwards
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,665
    J.Edwards
    Jan 20, 2006
  2. TheKeith
    Replies:
    20
    Views:
    106,374
    Chris Morris
    Oct 29, 2003
  3. hazz
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    49,526
    SkyUCHC
    Jun 9, 2010
  4. Stanimir Stamenkov
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    739
    Stanimir Stamenkov
    Oct 25, 2005
  5. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    717
Loading...

Share This Page