J2EE certification, how to go about?

Discussion in 'Java' started by music, Jul 12, 2003.

  1. music

    music Guest

    Hi folks:

    Sorry if this is OT. I hope that it's not. I'm trying to get back into
    middle tier development again (for the last year I have been doing
    Swing/JFC). I've been doing Java for 5+ years and C++ for 7+ years and
    have CORBA and JSP and Struts, etc.. However, many companies don't feel I
    am worth interviewing with since I have never had the opportunity to get any
    EJB experience. I even took an EJB training course but companies don't
    count that as valid. So I'm thinking about getting J2EE certified. I
    played around with JBoss at home but companies don't feel that counts
    either. They are only talking to those that have been "paid" for this
    experience.

    For someone thinking about this, what's the best place to start and what is
    the typical route for doing the certification?

    thanks again...
    music, Jul 12, 2003
    #1
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  2. music

    Tim Jowers Guest

    "Adam Maass" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > "music" <> wrote:
    > >
    > > Sorry if this is OT. I hope that it's not. I'm trying to get back into
    > > middle tier development again (for the last year I have been doing
    > > Swing/JFC). I've been doing Java for 5+ years and C++ for 7+ years and
    > > have CORBA and JSP and Struts, etc.. However, many companies don't feel

    > I
    > > am worth interviewing with since I have never had the opportunity to get

    > any


    So, isn't Struts still JSP/servlets; meaning it does not leverage the
    whole reasons for J2EE (built-in transaction support, pooling,
    distributed execution, object system, naming service, and security)?
    Don;t you have to manage transactions manually unless you use EJBs?
    Please let me know as I know little about Struts.

    > What is it with companies these days? Most of the offers I see seem to think


    Companies do not know the difference between hackers and engineers.
    Probably the certification problem is because the Computer Engineers
    failed to create a real certification program. Most all states have
    "Professional Engineer" licenses and restrict the use of the term
    Engineer to those that are licensed. Likewise for Doctors, Attorneys,
    and Pharmacists. Since we tried to be inclusive by not doing this, we
    failed to reaize some business person who doesn't even have an
    engineering degree would stand up and claim to be the certification
    authority. Really! As engineers we need to correct this if ever we
    expect this to get better. Right now we have the equivalent of witch
    doctors as the certifications do not certify understanding but just
    experience with a particular product. Just like certifying an
    Architect just because he knows how to use autocad!!!
    ....
    > or, more specifically,
    >
    > http://www.jcert.org/jobroles/enterpriseDev.html
    >
    > The only reason I could see myself trying to complete the program is if I
    > knew I could pass all the required exams resonably straightforwardly without
    > having to take the courses that cover the material in the exams.
    > Unfortunately, the certificate requires knowledge of one of BEA's, IBM's, or
    > Sun's J2EE servers in significant detail, and either I pick that up on the
    > job or take a class. So I haven't bothered with this program. (Incidently,
    > the first exam required for this certification is the same exam for "Sun
    > Certified Programmer for the Java 2 Platform.")
    >

    Really silly isn't it? Today anyone who knows how to confgure the XML
    files is almost a dinosaur since all major tools have wizards for
    this. Just like those "makefile" experts from the early 90's. I guess
    some folks like working on details even when a simpler way exists.
    Truly all that can be said is the XML configuration files are a
    shortcut for not having spent the time to make admin GUIs. An excuse
    that was acceptable about a decade ago but now just makes one consider
    using .Net. BTW, when is Sun going to release their updated Web
    Services tutorial (summer of 03 is well underway)? Talk about slack.
    One can clickety-click with VB.Net but AFAICT still has to weed
    through layers of tutorial to create a web service in Java. Maybe it
    is just me but I feel Sun is falling behind M$FT here and that is sad.
    The only saving grace is the Open Source movement which promises new
    products faster than M$FT. Perhaps it is time for Java to become an
    Apache project so it can fly rather than crawl. I'm being extreme but
    would like to see Java be the best platform.

    My $.02, TimJowers
    Tim Jowers, Jul 14, 2003
    #2
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